New runner needs help with allergies

New runner needs help with allergies

Post by Tom » Tue, 04 Mar 1997 04:00:00


        I just started running last year,10-15 mi./wk.I had trouble
with my sinuses and my Dr. diagnosed me with Allergy Rhinitis,hayfever
from pollen,dust,and dog hair(my two dogs are my running partners so
they must stay). I use Vancenase spray,25mg,but I'm not that happy with
it. It only comes in a small bottle($10)and only lasts one month. I
have an appointment next month for a physical and I would like to talk
to my Dr. about using something different. Any suggestions from fellow
runners with allergies would be greatly appreciated, Thanks.

 
 
 

New runner needs help with allergies

Post by Linda Cowle » Wed, 05 Mar 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

>         I just started running last year,10-15 mi./wk.I had trouble
> with my sinuses and my Dr. diagnosed me with Allergy Rhinitis,hayfever
> from pollen,dust,and dog hair(my two dogs are my running partners so
> they must stay). I use Vancenase spray,25mg,but I'm not that happy with
> it. It only comes in a small bottle($10)and only lasts one month....

Ahem!

Okay, folks, I'm going to disgust *almost* everyone, but the following technique
may help you quite a bit if you can bring yourself to do it. I have a friend who
had year-round alergies, started doing this twice a day, and experienced a "cure".

Try flushing your sinus cavities out after each run with tepid to warm water. I do
it in the shower, holding my breath, tilting my head back and letting the water
fill my sinus', blowing it out and repeating several times. There are other ways,
inhaling water, but it's trickier and more unpleasant. I flush my sinus' daily,
and get a cold or flu maybe once a year, if that. Haven't been sick for 14 months,
and I work with folks who are always ill... regular germ factories!

May sound disgusting, but when you check out the dirt and debris that accumulates
over a 24 hr period - especially if you run trails or have animals - this may
become a serious part of daily hygene. I think of dirty sinus' kind of like dirty
fingernails... gross!

--

Linda Cowles

 
 
 

New runner needs help with allergies

Post by Ozzie Gonta » Thu, 06 Mar 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

>         I just started running last year,10-15 mi./wk.I had trouble
> with my sinuses and my Dr. diagnosed me with Allergy Rhinitis,hayfever
> from pollen,dust,and dog hair(my two dogs are my running partners so
> they must stay). I use Vancenase spray,25mg,but I'm not that happy with
> it. It only comes in a small bottle($10)and only lasts one month. I
> have an appointment next month for a physical and I would like to talk
> to my Dr. about using something different. Any suggestions from fellow
> runners with allergies would be greatly appreciated, Thanks.

These were some thoughts on runny noses.  We don't know what kind of
trouble you had with your sinuses.  We don't know if you were breathing
mainly through the nose or through the mouth.  Depending on the weather,
the air may be dry, cold, dusty, polluted or with pollen counts high.  If
you're a mouth breather, then I'm not sure how you'd irritate your
sinuses.  At times when I've nose breathed for extended periods of time
while running and not being used to it...meaning not regularly practicing
nose breathing...my sinuses, mucous membrane lining of the nose have been
irritated by the air nose breathed in.  

Concerning your dogs, don't know how they can effect you more while
running than when you're at home with them or playing with them...unless
you touch your face or nose a lot with your hands after holding the dogs
or their leashes.   Anyway it smells like a pretty quick diagnosis.  He's
probably correct but I'd research other possibilities of the  sinus (?) or
nose(?) irritations seeing yourself as an experiment of one.

A digression where the cure obfuscates the problem

I remember a lady whose itchy legs after a mile of running would drive her
crazy so she'd stop running and scratch them and then be afraid to start
running fearing more of the same. Some doctors thought it was a
psychological problem, others an allergy. Her doctor finally prescribed an
antihistimine to take away the itching so she could continue to run. She
got beyond one mile.  But depending on the day she was stuck at two to
four miles because she felt that the itching would start and she was
afraid of having the itching.

I had learned years before from some doctor friends about the peripheral
circulation breakthrough for beginning women runners who get red splochy
legs which get real itchy.  It's just the peripheral *** flowing more
freely through dilated veins.

I told her what I had learned from some doctors about a common occurence
in women runners who had not been very active in their lives.  So what I
would do to help here would be to run with her and talk and run her
through the barrier of her itching. To make her comfortable we ran around
the baseball diamonds at Morley Field so we could be close to my car
should I have to take her to the hospital or to her doctor's office.  
Between miles 4 and 5, the itchiness increased to what she thought was
unbearable.  We kept on running as I kept talking about the naturalness of
her body finally breaking through to the beginning of the sweat reflex and
that once the *** flow was moving freely through her dilated veins she
feel the itchiness subside and finally go away.  As we finished mile 6 the
redness in her legs was gone and there was no more itchiness. We ran
another mile or two just to make sure that the itchiness wouldn't come
back.

Anyway, here's the post about runny noses:

First if your nose is running and your feet smell, it means you're built
upside down.

Second, nose breathing is great.  It moisturizes the air, it warms the air
and it purifies the air.  On colder days, the cold air can irritate the
mucous membranes. I've know some people on very cold days or on very
smoggy days to get pulmonary edema from the irritation of the cold or
pollutants when breathing through the mouth.  One 50 mile winner had to
sit up while sleeping because of the fluid on  his lungs due to smog
levels in Santa Monica.

 If you looked up mucus in the dictionary it would say, "A viscid,
slippery secretion produced by mucous membranes, which it moistens and
protects.  The air may be cold but have very little humidity, so the mucus
is doing its job of moistening and protecting.

If you blow you nose before running you will have cleaned out any of the
chunky or dried or semi-dried mucus.  Once you start running and your nose
starts to run, the mucus will be clear.  You can put your hand over your
nose and blow the excess mucus into your hand and then shake it off.  

Some runners have perfected the clearing of one nasal passage at a time by
closing one nostril with the index finger pressing on the outside of one
nasal passage and blowing forcefully out the opened passage, and then
repeating the same on the other side. A slight turn of the head is
necessary to avoid getting it on your clothes or arm.  Also the wind can
be a factor.

I personally prefer the hand over the nose.  It should be a concern  when
your nose doesn't run when you would expect it.  Might be an infection of
the mucous membrane.

--
In health and on the run,
Ozzie Gontang
Maintainer-rec.running FAQ
Director, San Diego Marathon Clinic,  est. 1975

 
 
 

New runner needs help with allergies

Post by oscarr.. » Fri, 07 Mar 1997 04:00:00

Quote:




> > >         I just started running last year,10-15 mi./wk.I had trouble
> > > with my sinuses and my Dr. diagnosed me with Allergy Rhinitis,hayfever
> > > from pollen,dust,and dog hair(my two dogs are my running partners so
> > > they must stay). I use Vancenase spray,25mg,but I'm not that happy with
> > > it. It only comes in a small bottle($10)and only lasts one month....

> > Ahem!

> > Okay, folks, I'm going to disgust *almost* everyone, but the following
> technique
> > may help you quite a bit if you can bring yourself to do it. I have a
> friend who
> > had year-round alergies, started doing this twice a day, and experienced
> a "cure".

> > Try flushing your sinus cavities out after each run with tepid to warm
> water. I do
> > it in the shower, holding my breath, tilting my head back and letting the
> water
> > fill my sinus', blowing it out and repeating several times. There are
> other ways,
> > inhaling water, but it's trickier and more unpleasant. I flush my sinus'
> daily,
> > and get a cold or flu maybe once a year, if that. Haven't been sick for
> 14 months,
> > and I work with folks who are always ill... regular germ factories!

> > May sound disgusting, but when you check out the dirt and debris that
> accumulates
> > over a 24 hr period - especially if you run trails or have animals - this may
> > become a serious part of daily hygene. I think of dirty sinus' kind of
> like dirty
> > fingernails... gross!

> > --

> > Linda Cowles

> Actually, yogis have used this technique for hundreds of years, and you can
> buy special pots designed to allow you to flush your nasal cavities with
> water.  Adding a little salt to water to where it is at about the same salt
> concentration as your body will make the entire experience more pleasant.

---------------
Is this advice for real? I seriously doubt this water flush is getting
into your sinuses unless your using a pipette. I think if this water
really got into your sinuses the pressure in the cavities would give you
a pounding headache. There's no way this "water treatment" is going to
reach your frontal sinus.

Question to Tom D: If the dogs aren't causing hay fever at home when
you're nearer to them, why would they be bothering you running? Doesn't
make sense. Furthermore, this "allergic rhinitis" your MD diagnosed
should occur whether you run or not, pollen is in the air period. Get a
second opinion from a sports medicine doctor. Do you have a history of
allergies? family history? Is it a reaction to the stress of running?
Does it happen with other sports? All these questions have to be
answered. Do this before you flush out your nose.

 
 
 

New runner needs help with allergies

Post by Ed Whi » Sat, 08 Mar 1997 04:00:00


Quote:


> >         I just started running last year,10-15 mi./wk.I had trouble
> > with my sinuses and my Dr. diagnosed me with Allergy Rhinitis,hayfever
> > from pollen,dust,and dog hair(my two dogs are my running partners so
> > they must stay). I use Vancenase spray,25mg,but I'm not that happy with
> > it. It only comes in a small bottle($10)and only lasts one month....

> Ahem!

> Okay, folks, I'm going to disgust *almost* everyone, but the following
technique
> may help you quite a bit if you can bring yourself to do it. I have a
friend who
> had year-round alergies, started doing this twice a day, and experienced
a "cure".

> Try flushing your sinus cavities out after each run with tepid to warm
water. I do
> it in the shower, holding my breath, tilting my head back and letting the
water
> fill my sinus', blowing it out and repeating several times. There are
other ways,
> inhaling water, but it's trickier and more unpleasant. I flush my sinus'
daily,
> and get a cold or flu maybe once a year, if that. Haven't been sick for
14 months,
> and I work with folks who are always ill... regular germ factories!

> May sound disgusting, but when you check out the dirt and debris that
accumulates
> over a 24 hr period - especially if you run trails or have animals - this may
> become a serious part of daily hygene. I think of dirty sinus' kind of
like dirty
> fingernails... gross!

> --

> Linda Cowles

Actually, yogis have used this technique for hundreds of years, and you can
buy special pots designed to allow you to flush your nasal cavities with
water.  Adding a little salt to water to where it is at about the same salt
concentration as your body will make the entire experience more pleasant.
 
 
 

New runner needs help with allergies

Post by Tanya Heikkine » Sat, 08 Mar 1997 04:00:00

Quote:
> > Actually, yogis have used this technique for hundreds of years, and you can
> > buy special pots designed to allow you to flush your nasal cavities with
> > water.  Adding a little salt to water to where it is at about the same salt
> > concentration as your body will make the entire experience more pleasant.
> ---------------
> Is this advice for real? I seriously doubt this water flush is getting
> into your sinuses unless your using a pipette. I think if this water
> really got into your sinuses the pressure in the cavities would give you
> a pounding headache. There's no way this "water treatment" is going to
> reach your frontal sinus.

It's absolutely true.  I've suffered from chronic sinusitis.  The neti
pot is shaped like Aladin's lamp, and the water is funnelled into one
nostril.  You tip your head to the side, and the water runs out the
other nostril.  The pressure is not as great as you think, it's not like
stuffing a garden hose up your nose.  It helps to cleanse the nasal
cavity and the sinuses.  Particularly effective for allergic conditions.

I'm not sure if the water actually gets *into* the frontal sinuses, but
I do know that it helps clear the sinus passages to the nasal cavity.
For sinusitis sufferers, the clogging of this passageway is the root of
the problem.  The continuous flow of water helps to bring more mucus out
of the sinus.  There are other things to add to the water to facilitate
the cleansing.

If you have more questions about this, feel free to email me, or look at
alt.support.sinusitis for more information.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Tanya Heikkinen        voice: (208) 885-2082
Computer Services        fax: (208) 885-7539

 
 
 

New runner needs help with allergies

Post by Linda Cowle » Wed, 12 Mar 1997 04:00:00

Quote:



> > >         I just started running last year,10-15 mi./wk.I had trouble
> > > with my sinuses and my Dr. diagnosed me with Allergy Rhinitis,hayfever
> > > from pollen,dust,and dog hair

> > Okay, folks, I'm going to disgust *almost* everyone...

> > Try flushing your sinus cavities out after each run with tepid to warm
> > water.
> Actually, yogis have used this technique for hundreds of years, and you can
> buy special pots designed to allow you to flush your nasal cavities with
> water.  Adding a little salt to water to where it is at about the same salt
> concentration as your body will make the entire experience more pleasant.

Yep - this is where my father originally picked up on it!

He practiced Yoga well before I was born... The salt takes the sting out, and
increasing the salt level seems to help with unpleasant cold symptoms.

I had another friend that said he compulsively runs when he has allergy symptoms
because it's the only time he can really get relief, but his nose runs too. Nasal
flushing helps him also, and he suspects that the runny-running-nose is his bodys
way of flushing his simuses.

But, me, I'm lazy... tilt the old head back and fill'er-up in the shower! Once
a day, at least.

--

Linda Cowles