How to Choose?

How to Choose?

Post by NYC XY » Sat, 23 Jul 2005 23:05:17


Hi, All:

I've got a sports injury which won't go away and am covered by GHI
(crazy service with out-of-date listings on their website!).  How do I
go about choosing?  I've already been to one who just poked me for two
minutes and prescribed ultrasound and stretches.  Is that usual?  The
doctor wasn't cold or brusque, but the procedure just seemed too
simple.  Right now my problem is that I really can't run (more of a hop
than forward-propulsion) due to hurting my "***muscles" (was on the
left at first, now it's both of 'em!), something or other in the socket
where the pelvis joins with the thigh bone....

So what should I look for?  I also didn't like the tired, "bubble-gum"
voice of the receptionists who answered at the offices I'd
called...felt like I was calling for pizza or something!

I guess same thing for physical therapy later; what do I look for?  How
do you "kick the tires" on something like this?  I've never needed
medical attention for anything in my whole life so this is all very
new.  Needless to say, it ain't like on TV....

I'm in the NYC area, BTW, if anyone knows of a knowledgeable doctor who
takes GHI....

TIA!

 
 
 

How to Choose?

Post by David Geesama » Sun, 24 Jul 2005 00:08:16


Quote:
> Hi, All:
> Right now my problem is that I really can't run (more of a hop
> than forward-propulsion) due to hurting my "***muscles" (was on the
> left at first, now it's both of 'em!), something or other in the socket
> where the pelvis joins with the thigh bone....

> So what should I look for?

    Well, in looking for doctors, look for someone who deals with athletes.
Find out who the local university and high schools refers their athletes to,
or the local minor pro sports teams.

    The symptoms you describe resemble (based on what little you said) to a
injury I once had. I got very tight down at the base of my gluteus, so that
when I swung my leg forward it didn't swing smoothly.  It would come and go
like a tight muscle, but I couldn't figure out how to stretch it.  Doctor
figured it was tendonitis in my paraformus muscles - muscles that attach to
the rear of your pelvis (or is it coccyx?) and pull on the rear of your
femur right below the ball joint.  By the 3rd day of taking prednisone (an
antinflammatory), it was almost gone.
    About a year later, I figured out how to stretch this spot.  To stretch
the left paraformus group, I sit on the floor with legs out, then pull in my
right foot so my knee is elevated and bent about 90.  I then pretzel my
left leg into a crossed-leg position with my left ankle resting on my right
knee.  Then by shifting my hips and moving my left knee closer to my head, I
can control the amount of the stretch.  This is now part of my stretching
routine, and I've never had the problem since.
    If this happens to be your sore spot, be careful and go slowly.  Pop a
light amount of Advil or your anti-inflammant of choice and do this stretch
for a week and see if that improves things.

    Dave

 
 
 

How to Choose?

Post by JMW » Sun, 24 Jul 2005 02:52:45

Quote:



>> Hi, All:
>> Right now my problem is that I really can't run (more of a hop
>> than forward-propulsion) due to hurting my "***muscles" (was on the
>> left at first, now it's both of 'em!), something or other in the socket
>> where the pelvis joins with the thigh bone....

>> So what should I look for?

>    Well, in looking for doctors, look for someone who deals with athletes.
>Find out who the local university and high schools refers their athletes to,
>or the local minor pro sports teams.

>    The symptoms you describe resemble (based on what little you said) to a
>injury I once had. I got very tight down at the base of my gluteus, so that
>when I swung my leg forward it didn't swing smoothly.  It would come and go
>like a tight muscle, but I couldn't figure out how to stretch it.  Doctor
>figured it was tendonitis in my paraformus muscles - muscles that attach to
>the rear of your pelvis (or is it coccyx?) and pull on the rear of your
>femur right below the ball joint.  By the 3rd day of taking prednisone (an
>antinflammatory), it was almost gone.

Corticosteroids can ameliorate sciatica from piriformis syndrome, but
some cases may be more severe than others, and the use of ***
corticosteroids can create systemic problems over time, not the least
of which is osteoporosis.  Direct injection with a long cardiac-type
needle may be indicated.

Quote:
>    About a year later, I figured out how to stretch this spot.  To stretch
>the left paraformus group, I sit on the floor with legs out, then pull in my
>right foot so my knee is elevated and bent about 90.  I then pretzel my
>left leg into a crossed-leg position with my left ankle resting on my right
>knee.  Then by shifting my hips and moving my left knee closer to my head, I
>can control the amount of the stretch.  This is now part of my stretching
>routine, and I've never had the problem since.
>    If this happens to be your sore spot, be careful and go slowly.  Pop a
>light amount of Advil or your anti-inflammant of choice and do this stretch
>for a week and see if that improves things.

One must be very careful, indeed, when doing this type of stretch.  

 
 
 

How to Choose?

Post by Peanutjak » Sun, 24 Jul 2005 04:26:08


Quote:
> Hi, All:

> I've got a sports injury which won't go away and am covered by GHI
> (crazy service with out-of-date listings on their website!).  How do I
> go about choosing?  I've already been to one who just poked me for two
> minutes and prescribed ultrasound and stretches.  Is that usual?  The
> doctor wasn't cold or brusque, but the procedure just seemed too
> simple.  Right now my problem is that I really can't run (more of a hop
> than forward-propulsion) due to hurting my "***muscles" (was on the
> left at first, now it's both of 'em!), something or other in the socket
> where the pelvis joins with the thigh bone....

> So what should I look for?  I also didn't like the tired, "bubble-gum"
> voice of the receptionists who answered at the offices I'd
> called...felt like I was calling for pizza or something!

> I guess same thing for physical therapy later; what do I look for?  How
> do you "kick the tires" on something like this?  I've never needed
> medical attention for anything in my whole life so this is all very
> new.  Needless to say, it ain't like on TV....

> I'm in the NYC area, BTW, if anyone knows of a knowledgeable doctor who
> takes GHI....

> TIA!

Do a Google search for

  sports medicine new york ghi

You will find lots of choices.

PJ

 
 
 

How to Choose?

Post by David Geesama » Sun, 24 Jul 2005 05:08:38


Quote:

>>    The symptoms you describe resemble (based on what little you said) to
>> a
>>injury I once had. I got very tight down at the base of my gluteus, so
>>that
>>when I swung my leg forward it didn't swing smoothly.  It would come and
>>go
>>like a tight muscle, but I couldn't figure out how to stretch it.  Doctor
>>figured it was tendonitis in my paraformus muscles - muscles that attach
>>to
>>the rear of your pelvis (or is it coccyx?) and pull on the rear of your
>>femur right below the ball joint.  By the 3rd day of taking prednisone (an
>>antinflammatory), it was almost gone.

> Corticosteroids can ameliorate sciatica from piriformis syndrome, but
> some cases may be more severe than others, and the use of ***
> corticosteroids can create systemic problems over time, not the least
> of which is osteoporosis.  Direct injection with a long cardiac-type
> needle may be indicated.

    In simpler terms, the doc gave me three options.  1, (the least
aggressive) to 3 (the most aggressive).  Prednisone was number 3.  I think I
took the prednisone for a week and that was all.  I'm not a doctor,
obviously, this is only one datapoint.

    Dave

 
 
 

How to Choose?

Post by NYC XY » Sun, 24 Jul 2005 10:41:10

Quote:

> Do a Google search for

>   sports medicine new york ghi

> You will find lots of choices.

> PJ

Thanks, but what I'd meant was how do I sift the wheat from the chaff?

Like I said, the doc I saw, who was normally with NY Hospital Cntr. of
Queens, and he poked me for a few seconds -- the whole affair lasted
two minutes!  He wasn't condescending or anything, but he seemed to
shrug it as no big deal, common stuff, as long as I was able to move
the muscle, however awkwardly, it wasn't serious.

I need more attention than that!  =\

 
 
 

How to Choose?

Post by spodosauru » Sun, 24 Jul 2005 19:11:26

Quote:




>>>Hi, All:
>>>Right now my problem is that I really can't run (more of a hop
>>>than forward-propulsion) due to hurting my "***muscles" (was on the
>>>left at first, now it's both of 'em!), something or other in the socket
>>>where the pelvis joins with the thigh bone....

>>>So what should I look for?

>>   Well, in looking for doctors, look for someone who deals with athletes.
>>Find out who the local university and high schools refers their athletes to,
>>or the local minor pro sports teams.

>>   The symptoms you describe resemble (based on what little you said) to a
>>injury I once had. I got very tight down at the base of my gluteus, so that
>>when I swung my leg forward it didn't swing smoothly.  It would come and go
>>like a tight muscle, but I couldn't figure out how to stretch it.  Doctor
>>figured it was tendonitis in my paraformus muscles - muscles that attach to
>>the rear of your pelvis (or is it coccyx?) and pull on the rear of your
>>femur right below the ball joint.  By the 3rd day of taking prednisone (an
>>antinflammatory), it was almost gone.

> Corticosteroids can ameliorate sciatica from piriformis syndrome, but
> some cases may be more severe than others, and the use of ***
> corticosteroids can create systemic problems over time, not the least
> of which is osteoporosis.  Direct injection with a long cardiac-type
> needle may be indicated.

I've had that done for piriformis syndrome many many years ago. It
didn't help the problem very much (YMMV), but the procedure wasn't
painful either (again, YMMV). And the needle was quite thin, much tinner
than the IM injection needles I get 3x/week now.

--
spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo

I'm going to die rather sooner than I'd like. I tried to protect my
neighbours from crime, and became the victim of it. Complications in
hospital following this resulted in a serious illness. I now need a bone
marrow transplant. Many people around the world are waiting for a marrow
transplant, too. Please volunteer to be a marrow donor:
http://SportToday.org/
http://SportToday.org/

 
 
 

How to Choose?

Post by JMW » Mon, 25 Jul 2005 02:06:17

Quote:




>>>>Hi, All:
>>>>Right now my problem is that I really can't run (more of a hop
>>>>than forward-propulsion) due to hurting my "***muscles" (was on the
>>>>left at first, now it's both of 'em!), something or other in the socket
>>>>where the pelvis joins with the thigh bone....

>>>>So what should I look for?

>>>   Well, in looking for doctors, look for someone who deals with athletes.
>>>Find out who the local university and high schools refers their athletes to,
>>>or the local minor pro sports teams.

>>>   The symptoms you describe resemble (based on what little you said) to a
>>>injury I once had. I got very tight down at the base of my gluteus, so that
>>>when I swung my leg forward it didn't swing smoothly.  It would come and go
>>>like a tight muscle, but I couldn't figure out how to stretch it.  Doctor
>>>figured it was tendonitis in my paraformus muscles - muscles that attach to
>>>the rear of your pelvis (or is it coccyx?) and pull on the rear of your
>>>femur right below the ball joint.  By the 3rd day of taking prednisone (an
>>>antinflammatory), it was almost gone.

>> Corticosteroids can ameliorate sciatica from piriformis syndrome, but
>> some cases may be more severe than others, and the use of ***
>> corticosteroids can create systemic problems over time, not the least
>> of which is osteoporosis.  Direct injection with a long cardiac-type
>> needle may be indicated.

>I've had that done for piriformis syndrome many many years ago. It
>didn't help the problem very much (YMMV), but the procedure wasn't
>painful either (again, YMMV). And the needle was quite thin, much tinner
>than the IM injection needles I get 3x/week now.

I didn't have it done, but my wife did.  It isn't so much the needle
that causes pain as the corticosteroid.  My understanding is that they
mix it with an analgesic so that it doesn't feel like you're being
injected with lit napalm.
 
 
 

How to Choose?

Post by John » Mon, 25 Jul 2005 08:46:13


Quote:
> Hi, All:

> I've got a sports injury which won't go away and am covered by GHI
> (crazy service with out-of-date listings on their website!).  How do I
> go about choosing?  I've already been to one who just poked me for two
> minutes and prescribed ultrasound and stretches.  Is that usual?  The
> doctor wasn't cold or brusque, but the procedure just seemed too
> simple.  Right now my problem is that I really can't run (more of a hop
> than forward-propulsion) due to hurting my "***muscles" (was on the
> left at first, now it's both of 'em!), something or other in the socket
> where the pelvis joins with the thigh bone....

> So what should I look for?  I also didn't like the tired, "bubble-gum"
> voice of the receptionists who answered at the offices I'd
> called...felt like I was calling for pizza or something!

> I guess same thing for physical therapy later; what do I look for?  How
> do you "kick the tires" on something like this?  I've never needed
> medical attention for anything in my whole life so this is all very
> new.  Needless to say, it ain't like on TV....

> I'm in the NYC area, BTW, if anyone knows of a knowledgeable doctor who
> takes GHI....

It's a tumah.
 
 
 

How to Choose?

Post by Shawn Hir » Mon, 25 Jul 2005 12:07:22



Quote:

> > Do a Google search for

> >   sports medicine new york ghi

> > You will find lots of choices.

> > PJ

> Thanks, but what I'd meant was how do I sift the wheat from the chaff?

Contact the NYC AMA chapter and ask if they offer a referral service.
 
 
 

How to Choose?

Post by Dot » Mon, 25 Jul 2005 12:27:02

Quote:



>>Hi, All:
>>Right now my problem is that I really can't run (more of a hop
>>than forward-propulsion) due to hurting my "***muscles" (was on the
>>left at first, now it's both of 'em!), something or other in the socket
>>where the pelvis joins with the thigh bone....

>>So what should I look for?

>     Well, in looking for doctors, look for someone who deals with athletes.
> Find out who the local university and high schools refers their athletes to,
> or the local minor pro sports teams.

Following up on this, you might ask other runners or at a running store
and see if there's some consistency among names of doctors / PT to use
or not use.

FWIW, I've had better luck with current PT recommended by running store
than with original PT recommended by regular doctor who runs. (I live in
small town.)

Dot

--
"Success is different things to different people"
-Bernd Heinrich in Racing the Antelope

 
 
 

How to Choose?

Post by David Geesama » Tue, 26 Jul 2005 21:15:11


Quote:

> Thanks, but what I'd meant was how do I sift the wheat from the chaff?

> Like I said, the doc I saw, who was normally with NY Hospital Cntr. of
> Queens, and he poked me for a few seconds -- the whole affair lasted
> two minutes!  He wasn't condescending or anything, but he seemed to
> shrug it as no big deal, common stuff, as long as I was able to move
> the muscle, however awkwardly, it wasn't serious.

> I need more attention than that!  =\

    Sometimes, some doctors deal with one particular kind of athlete and not
others.  So if you're a runner at a doctor who mostly handles weekend
warrior football players, they truly won't understand the importance of a
consistently stiff muscle.  In other sports you can hobble around and
protect your weak spot, and continue to play until it heals.
    In running, you can't really do that at all.  Small aggravations get
very painful at some point, and since they're stress-related usually they
cannot be ignored.  IMO, it's nearly impossible to train through a minor
injury like this without significant risk of worsening it.  Doctors who've
been runners generally make for excellent resources.

    Dave