My first Half-Marathon!

My first Half-Marathon!

Post by 2.7182818284590.. » Tue, 31 May 2011 09:04:01


Hello guys,

Early this morning at 6:30 AM, I awoke to run my first half-marathon
here in Boston during our Memorial Day weekend.  Prior to this, the
farthest I've ever ran was 9 miles on a treadmill but also 10 miles
with a lot of breaks on a treadmill.  So you can imagine my wariness.
I've been quite nervous the last few days thinking about this
challenge, but rest assured, I rose to the challenge!

Earlier this week, I bought a brand-new pair of running shoes, and I
took some rest days.  The last 3 days, I carb-loaded, and I ate a lot
of pasta.  Last night, I made myself eat lots of food before I went to
sleep, because I knew that I wouldn't have time to eat much in the
morning.

This morning, I drank my famous smoothie, which is made of a banana,
some frozen blueberries, fat-free Greek strained yogurt, some whey
protein powder, but today, I avoided putting my usual 2 tablespoons of
flax because I didn't want "surprise moments."  I also drank some hot,
ginger tea.

When I got there to South Boston, I parked my car, and I chatted with
an older guy.  He was very jovial, and basically, he told me good
luck.  When I got to the racer's complex by foot, which was like a
half mile away, I saw thousands of runners about to run many different
events - 3, 5, and 13.1 miles.  I was to bring with me 4 KIND granola
bars, and that's it.

Just before race time, my heart was racing like crazy:  It was beating
at around 144 BPM, and I hadn't even started running yet!  At 8:00
sharp, the race began!  For the first 5 minutes, it was *very* slow.
I actually calculated that the slow start equated to 1:20 minutes of
not moving.  After 5 minutes, we were no longer walking.

Miles 1-2 were TOUGH as usual.  In my mind, I was thinking to myself
"Look - if you want, you can quit the race at mile 5 or 6.  It's as
simple as that."  I kept moving forwards.  Most everyone was advancing
and overtaking me, which is OK, but things started changing at mile
4:  I noticed that some folks started walking, and that I was
advancing racers.  Around this time, I threw 2 of my granola bars
away, as they were a big burden to bring with me.

I drank a little water at the refresh stations, and more importantly
on today's humid day, I poured water on my face - AAhhhh!!!  This
sounds corny, but I had real spiritual moments during all this.  I
don't know why, but I was feeling quite spiritual.  Anyways, I
marveled at how I didn't need to go to the bathroom or take a walking
break...mile 6.5 - the halfway point - I didn't take my break either,
even though I assumed that I'd need to do this.

Starting mile 9, I decided to eat one of my KIND granola bars.  This
may have been a mistake.  Around this time, I felt a bit nauseous, but
this feeling went away soon.  At mile 11, man, I knew that I wouldn't
take any breaks - bathroom or walking or whatnot.  I paced myself, and
at the next water station, I sort of paused for like 2 seconds, and I
cringe as I type this, but I DIDN'T STOP - I jogged in place, and
quickly got the hell out!  This was my low point of the race, and I
feel bad about this.

Finally, the home stretch was like approaching an optical illusion.
No matter how close I got to what I perceived to be the end, the end
seemed to advance away from me.  I wasn't sure where the race ended,
but I was feeling ecstatic.  At past 2:15, I completed my first half-
marathon!

Just after the race, it seemed that I felt like I was being propelled
forwards, or maybe that I was about to fall forwards.  So I sat down,
and stretched a little.  I also ate one of my KIND granola bars
(although I threw away 2 of them, I still had 2 left over, one of
which I ate at mile 9).

The walk back to my car was TOUGH!  It was the hardest 0.5 mile walk
in my life.  I felt shaky and tired, but I got there to my parked car,
it was a good but wary time:  What if I had a heart attack?  My left
shoulder was aching me a bit, and what if this is a myocardial
symptom?

When I got home, I took a nice, warm shower.  I was exhausted - more
than I've ever been in my life!  I ate a ton of pasta with cheese,
lots of water, I took a nap at noon sharp after watching TV a bit.
Woke up less than an hour later with a bad headache and went back for
another nap a few hours later.  I ate more pasta and drank some more
ginger tea.  Now, it's 8:00 PM, and I feel great, but still
exhausted.  I'm definitely *NOT* ever going to run a full-marathon.
Maybe other half-marathons, but not a full marathon. I feel way too
beaten up right now.

Friends, I feel so connected to the world right now.  I feel euphoric
for not pausing once during the entire race. I can apply some of my
skills to real-world use, and I am more confident in my abilities.

 
 
 

My first Half-Marathon!

Post by Bart Mathia » Tue, 31 May 2011 09:28:48

On Sun, 29 May 2011 17:04:01 -0700 (PDT)

Quote:

> Hello guys,

> Early this morning at 6:30 AM, I awoke to run my first half-marathon
> here in Boston during our Memorial Day weekend.  Prior to this, the
> farthest I've ever ran was 9 miles on a treadmill but also 10 miles
> with a lot of breaks on a treadmill.  So you can imagine my wariness.
> I've been quite nervous the last few days thinking about this
> challenge, but rest assured, I rose to the challenge!

Congratulations!

Quote:
> Earlier this week, I bought a brand-new pair of running shoes, and I
> took some rest days.  The last 3 days, I carb-loaded, and I ate a lot
> of pasta.  Last night, I made myself eat lots of food before I went to
> sleep, because I knew that I wouldn't have time to eat much in the
> morning.

If you had mentioned here that you were going to do that first thing, you
might have gotten some static. I assume you ran in your new shoes, and they
didn't hurt you?
--


 
 
 

My first Half-Marathon!

Post by John Hurle » Tue, 31 May 2011 09:38:56

Mr. Numbers:

Hey congratulations and thanks for your race report.  A couple of
thoughts and then some questions.

Running on a dreadmill for me is just something I ever want to do.
Even running laps on an inside track or just around the block in my
neighborhood is preferable to a dreadmill.  I have to give you some
props for gutting out 9 and 10 miles on a dreadmill.

The concentration it takes to stay on a mill is too much for me.  Miss
a step or 2 and then whammo thrown out the back side.  Mentally it is
just way too much for me.

Marathons are tough events and events that I gave up running and
racing a long time back.  No reason any runner should ever feel that
they have to put themselves thru that ordeal unless it is a self
inflicted desire.  Way too easy to get hurt and/or sick when trying to
get prepared.  Plus well I really suck at racing past 20 miles ...

How long have you been running?

Any reason you don't get outside for your long runs?

I still think it is a really bad idea to think that you can get away
with running 1500 miles on a pair of shoes.  Even half that many miles
is for most runners a bad idea.

Just because a few people say they can get away with something high in
the miles that they put a pair of shoes through does not mean that any
specific ( especially perhaps someone kind of new to the running
scene ) runner will find that idea works long term for them.

# Friends, I feel so connected to the world right now. ?I feel
euphoric for not pausing once during the entire race.

Hey that's the endorphins kicking in and probably some well deserved
self respect kicking in!

# I can apply some of my skills to real-world use, and I am more
confident in my abilities.

Chasing down perps?

 
 
 

My first Half-Marathon!

Post by John Hurle » Tue, 31 May 2011 09:44:35

Bart:

Numbers wrote ... Earlier this week, I bought a brand-new pair of
running shoes, and I took some rest days.

Bart responded:

... If you had mentioned here that you were going to do that first
thing, you might have gotten some static. I assume you ran in your new
shoes, and they didn't hurt you?

Just for background it is "usually" not a problem racing in new shoes
that are the same model as what you are currently training and racing
in.  Most of us though prefer to break in a new pair for at least a
week before any kind of race.

Switching models right before a race and racing in a switched model
can often result in blister city.  That is reduced by the mileage of a
race ( 1/2 marathon being much less likely to cause serious grief than
a full ).

Many of us use the old vaseline trick ... we know the pressure and rub
points of our feet and toes and get some vaseline applied prior to
putting on socks.  Get the feet thoroughly dried off before using that
technique.

 
 
 

My first Half-Marathon!

Post by Sericinus hunte » Tue, 31 May 2011 11:21:03

    Very good. Congratulations.
    So, when is your next?


Quote:
> Hello guys,

> Early this morning at 6:30 AM, I awoke to run my first half-marathon
> here in Boston during our Memorial Day weekend.  Prior to this, the
> farthest I've ever ran was 9 miles on a treadmill but also 10 miles
> with a lot of breaks on a treadmill.  So you can imagine my wariness.
> I've been quite nervous the last few days thinking about this
> challenge, but rest assured, I rose to the challenge!

> Earlier this week, I bought a brand-new pair of running shoes, and I
> took some rest days.  The last 3 days, I carb-loaded, and I ate a lot
> of pasta.  Last night, I made myself eat lots of food before I went to
> sleep, because I knew that I wouldn't have time to eat much in the
> morning.

> This morning, I drank my famous smoothie, which is made of a banana,
> some frozen blueberries, fat-free Greek strained yogurt, some whey
> protein powder, but today, I avoided putting my usual 2 tablespoons of
> flax because I didn't want "surprise moments."  I also drank some hot,
> ginger tea.

> When I got there to South Boston, I parked my car, and I chatted with
> an older guy.  He was very jovial, and basically, he told me good
> luck.  When I got to the racer's complex by foot, which was like a
> half mile away, I saw thousands of runners about to run many different
> events - 3, 5, and 13.1 miles.  I was to bring with me 4 KIND granola
> bars, and that's it.

> Just before race time, my heart was racing like crazy:  It was beating
> at around 144 BPM, and I hadn't even started running yet!  At 8:00
> sharp, the race began!  For the first 5 minutes, it was *very* slow.
> I actually calculated that the slow start equated to 1:20 minutes of
> not moving.  After 5 minutes, we were no longer walking.

> Miles 1-2 were TOUGH as usual.  In my mind, I was thinking to myself
> "Look - if you want, you can quit the race at mile 5 or 6.  It's as
> simple as that."  I kept moving forwards.  Most everyone was advancing
> and overtaking me, which is OK, but things started changing at mile
> 4:  I noticed that some folks started walking, and that I was
> advancing racers.  Around this time, I threw 2 of my granola bars
> away, as they were a big burden to bring with me.

> I drank a little water at the refresh stations, and more importantly
> on today's humid day, I poured water on my face - AAhhhh!!!  This
> sounds corny, but I had real spiritual moments during all this.  I
> don't know why, but I was feeling quite spiritual.  Anyways, I
> marveled at how I didn't need to go to the bathroom or take a walking
> break...mile 6.5 - the halfway point - I didn't take my break either,
> even though I assumed that I'd need to do this.

> Starting mile 9, I decided to eat one of my KIND granola bars.  This
> may have been a mistake.  Around this time, I felt a bit nauseous, but
> this feeling went away soon.  At mile 11, man, I knew that I wouldn't
> take any breaks - bathroom or walking or whatnot.  I paced myself, and
> at the next water station, I sort of paused for like 2 seconds, and I
> cringe as I type this, but I DIDN'T STOP - I jogged in place, and
> quickly got the hell out!  This was my low point of the race, and I
> feel bad about this.

> Finally, the home stretch was like approaching an optical illusion.
> No matter how close I got to what I perceived to be the end, the end
> seemed to advance away from me.  I wasn't sure where the race ended,
> but I was feeling ecstatic.  At past 2:15, I completed my first half-
> marathon!

> Just after the race, it seemed that I felt like I was being propelled
> forwards, or maybe that I was about to fall forwards.  So I sat down,
> and stretched a little.  I also ate one of my KIND granola bars
> (although I threw away 2 of them, I still had 2 left over, one of
> which I ate at mile 9).

> The walk back to my car was TOUGH!  It was the hardest 0.5 mile walk
> in my life.  I felt shaky and tired, but I got there to my parked car,
> it was a good but wary time:  What if I had a heart attack?  My left
> shoulder was aching me a bit, and what if this is a myocardial
> symptom?

> When I got home, I took a nice, warm shower.  I was exhausted - more
> than I've ever been in my life!  I ate a ton of pasta with cheese,
> lots of water, I took a nap at noon sharp after watching TV a bit.
> Woke up less than an hour later with a bad headache and went back for
> another nap a few hours later.  I ate more pasta and drank some more
> ginger tea.  Now, it's 8:00 PM, and I feel great, but still
> exhausted.  I'm definitely *NOT* ever going to run a full-marathon.
> Maybe other half-marathons, but not a full marathon. I feel way too
> beaten up right now.

> Friends, I feel so connected to the world right now.  I feel euphoric
> for not pausing once during the entire race. I can apply some of my
> skills to real-world use, and I am more confident in my abilities.

 
 
 

My first Half-Marathon!

Post by pithydou » Tue, 31 May 2011 21:09:27



Quote:
> Hello guys,
>?I'm definitely *NOT* ever going to run a full-marathon.
> Maybe other half-marathons, but not a full marathon. I feel way too
> beaten up right now.

How many of us have said the same thing when we  started running and
pushing up the distances - "never again!" :)  A few days of recover
and some pause to reflect what you could do different (like get off
that confounded dreadmill ;) )  and you will be thinking about the
marathon.  I would at least take to the roads for your training and
try another 1/2 and then revisit. That said, take your time, like a
year or so, before you try to kick it up.

-D

 
 
 

My first Half-Marathon!

Post by 2.7182818284590.. » Wed, 01 Jun 2011 11:40:00


Quote:
> On Sun, 29 May 2011 17:04:01 -0700 (PDT)


> > Hello guys,

> > Early this morning at 6:30 AM, I awoke to run my first half-marathon
> > here in Boston during our Memorial Day weekend. ?Prior to this, the
> > farthest I've ever ran was 9 miles on a treadmill but also 10 miles
> > with a lot of breaks on a treadmill. ?So you can imagine my wariness.
> > I've been quite nervous the last few days thinking about this
> > challenge, but rest assured, I rose to the challenge!

> Congratulations!

> > Earlier this week, I bought a brand-new pair of running shoes, and I
> > took some rest days. ?The last 3 days, I carb-loaded, and I ate a lot
> > of pasta. ?Last night, I made myself eat lots of food before I went to
> > sleep, because I knew that I wouldn't have time to eat much in the
> > morning.

> If you had mentioned here that you were going to do that first thing, you
> might have gotten some static. I assume you ran in your new shoes, and they
> didn't hurt you?
> --


Bart,

My brand-new pair of Asics Blur 33 (NOTE:  This is NOT stealth
adverti***t) was worn on race day, and I had no problems with them.
I realized that after several miles of feet-pounding, that one's foot
expands.  As a result, my short toe (the one most lateral) was under
pressure and in constant contact with the shoe.

 
 
 

My first Half-Marathon!

Post by 2.7182818284590.. » Wed, 01 Jun 2011 11:53:49


Quote:
> Mr. Numbers:

> Hey congratulations and thanks for your race report. ?A couple of
> thoughts and then some questions.

Thank you so much, John.  You know what, Mr. Hurley?  I'm not a
product spokesman, or a stealth advertiser.  I'm just a broad-minded,
eclectic person who's been reading this newsgroup recently after a 14
year hiatus.

Quote:
> Running on a dreadmill for me is just something I ever want to do.
> Even running laps on an inside track or just around the block in my
> neighborhood is preferable to a dreadmill. ?I have to give you some
> props for gutting out 9 and 10 miles on a dreadmill.

John, the key is simple:  I don't have cable TV.  I tell the people at
my gym to change the TV docked on the treadmill to what I want to
watch, which is typically something like History Channel.  Moreover, I
have a lot of other perks close by:  Water fountain, bathroom, and
pretty girls close by!

But I have noticed that running on a treadmill is slightly more
difficult than out in the open.  My cruising speed on a treadmill is
like 5.5MPH, but outside, it's more like 6.3 MPH.  However, during my
half, it was pretty much exactly 5.5.

Quote:
> The concentration it takes to stay on a mill is too much for me. ?Miss
> a step or 2 and then whammo thrown out the back side. ?Mentally it is
> just way too much for me.

I've never had this problem.  I do feel that running on a treadmill is
not as great as running outside.  On a treadmill, it's like you're
breathing slightly recycled air.  Outside, the sights/sounds change,
and this is more mentally engaging, of course, you can watch TV
inside :)  All in all, running inside VS outside is like eating a
delicious pizza with a fork and knife - too unnatural.

Quote:
> Marathons are tough events and events that I gave up running and
> racing a long time back. ?No reason any runner should ever feel that
> they have to put themselves thru that ordeal unless it is a self
> inflicted desire. ?Way too easy to get hurt and/or sick when trying to
> get prepared. ?Plus well I really suck at racing past 20 miles ...

I think that 13.1 is enough for me.  The way I felt last night was
LOUSY!  A marathon would have had me killed.

Quote:
> How long have you been running?

I've been running 15-20 miles a week since '06, but 20-25 miles since
January or so.  However, I noticed that my last few months of running,
something happened:  I think that I love running more.  I ran a 7
miler with my running club, and I remember thinking that I could
double that run a month or 2 ago.

Quote:
> Any reason you don't get outside for your long runs?

Because after my runs on a treadmill, I can go downstairs and lift
some weights perhaps, or even take a shower.  Of course, I may stretch
a bit.

Quote:
> I still think it is a really bad idea to think that you can get away
> with running 1500 miles on a pair of shoes. ?Even half that many miles
> is for most runners a bad idea.

Absolutely everyone has told me this.  Keep in mind, John, that just a
few years ago, shoe companies were bragging about "maximal
cushioning", but today, they're bragging about the virtues of
"minimalism."  So naturally, they want to tell you what maximizes
their revenues.  Of course, the Big Shoe Inc. wants you to perpetually
buy shoes every 3-6 months.  That's one hell of a business model.  I
personally think that if cushioning is good, then my worn out shoe
offers more cushioning than a Vibram Bikila 5-Finger shoe.  Moreover,
if minimalism is good, than, my worn out Asics Nimbus (purchased Jan.
1st, 2010 with 1,500 miles on them) should be more minimalistic than a
brand new pair of shoes.  My car, OTOH, requires new tires every
100,000 miles, so Big Shoe Inc. is up to no good.

Quote:
> Just because a few people say they can get away with something high in
> the miles that they put a pair of shoes through does not mean that any
> specific ( especially perhaps someone kind of new to the running
> scene ) runner will find that idea works long term for them.

> # Friends, I feel so connected to the world right now. ?I feel
> euphoric for not pausing once during the entire race.

> Hey that's the endorphins kicking in and probably some well deserved
> self respect kicking in!

> # I can apply some of my skills to real-world use, and I am more
> confident in my abilities.

> Chasing down perps?

I thank you for your kind words, endor***ts, and for your comraderie
here in ***space.
 
 
 

My first Half-Marathon!

Post by 2.7182818284590.. » Wed, 01 Jun 2011 11:58:13


Quote:
> ? ? Very good. Congratulations.
> ? ? So, when is your next?

Sericinus:

Great question.  I can't wait for the next one!!!  I had a blast on
this one!  Perhaps, just maybe, I'll do a full?  Maybe an 19.6 miler
first.  That's as far as I want to go.  Man, this was such a RUSH and
it felt so ***ive to be running amongst all the people.  There was
something so primal about it all.  Moreover, I learned from my
mistakes in yesterday's race (i.e. 1.  Don't eat those granola bars
during your run.  2.  Wear a softer shirt.  3.  Perhaps have some
Gatorade with me.  4.  After the race, MAKE PLANS TO GET BACK TO MY
CAR IF PARKED TOO FAR AWAY).

 
 
 

My first Half-Marathon!

Post by 2.7182818284590.. » Wed, 01 Jun 2011 11:59:26


Quote:


> > Hello guys,
> >?I'm definitely *NOT* ever going to run a full-marathon.
> > Maybe other half-marathons, but not a full marathon. I feel way too
> > beaten up right now.

> How many of us have said the same thing when we ?started running and
> pushing up the distances - "never again!" :) ?A few days of recover
> and some pause to reflect what you could do different (like get off
> that confounded dreadmill ;) ) ?and you will be thinking about the
> marathon. ?I would at least take to the roads for your training and
> try another 1/2 and then revisit. That said, take your time, like a
> year or so, before you try to kick it up.

> -D

Oh no!  You mean that I kicked my cigarette habit for an ***ion to
flax seeds, Chobani-fat-free yogurt, and low *** pressure?
 
 
 

My first Half-Marathon!

Post by Sericinus hunte » Wed, 01 Jun 2011 12:12:07


Quote:

>>      Very good. Congratulations.
>>      So, when is your next?

> Sericinus:

> Great question.  I can't wait for the next one!!!  I had a blast on
> this one!  Perhaps, just maybe, I'll do a full?

    See? You are already faster than many of us. You will indeed,
I have no doubts about it. Just don't force it, take your time.

Quote:
> Maybe an 19.6 miler
> first.  That's as far as I want to go.  Man, this was such a RUSH and
> it felt so ***ive to be running amongst all the people.  There was
> something so primal about it all.  Moreover, I learned from my
> mistakes in yesterday's race (i.e. 1.  Don't eat those granola bars
> during your run.  2.  Wear a softer shirt.  3.  Perhaps have some
> Gatorade with me.  4.  After the race, MAKE PLANS TO GET BACK TO MY
> CAR IF PARKED TOO FAR AWAY).

    You are getting there! Welcome!
    Seriously, I am glad to see such an e***ment from you.

    By the way, do you know how we, in the USSR, were taught to memorize
the e-number? Two-seven-and-then-two-times-a-year-when-Leo-Tolstoy-was-born.

 
 
 

My first Half-Marathon!

Post by pithydou » Wed, 01 Jun 2011 20:43:21



Quote:



> > > Hello guys,
> > >?I'm definitely *NOT* ever going to run a full-marathon.
> > > Maybe other half-marathons, but not a full marathon. I feel way too
> > > beaten up right now.

> > How many of us have said the same thing when we ?started running and
> > pushing up the distances - "never again!" :) ?A few days of recover
> > and some pause to reflect what you could do different (like get off
> > that confounded dreadmill ;) ) ?and you will be thinking about the
> > marathon. ?I would at least take to the roads for your training and
> > try another 1/2 and then revisit. That said, take your time, like a
> > year or so, before you try to kick it up.

> > -D

> Oh no! ?You mean that I kicked my cigarette habit for an ***ion to
> flax seeds, Chobani-fat-free yogurt, and low *** pressure?

Love your id but wouldn't Pi have worked equally well?

Yup, one ***ion for another albeit alleged to be somewhat healthier
yet *** slap and frustrate if you try too much too soon. A little
like dating.

I see you understand well the adaptive ability of the shoe companies
to the minimalist movement and to get one to buy many  new kicks  each
year- fat or skinny versions. They will gladly sell us what we want,
over and over and over..... How many miles does one get from a pair of
5fingers or 4 oz. bottoms with laces?  I expect $$frequent$$ visits
back to the store. You on the other hand violate the business model.
How dare you buy a pair of shoes they want you to wear for at most 500
miles and get 1,500 uninjured miles!  I don't think the shoe companies
will be pleased with your discovery.

Reminds me of my 20 year old Toyota van that got 200,000 miles from
the original exhaust system. Why, because they knew about stainless
steel 20 years ago. A slight digression but goes to the notion of
planned obsolescence.

The are some 30k's out there although not common.

Tis the pretty girls that keeps you  in the gym? - quite
understandable!  We are all slaves to oneor more emotuons. Check with
the running club and you may find there are  ladies that  like to run
on the trials combining mother nature with your testosterone. Gives
hug a tree and new meaning. Pack a water bottle, do your potty in the
woods and enjoy birds and the bees. And please, no head phones.

-Doug

 
 
 

My first Half-Marathon!

Post by John Hurle » Wed, 01 Jun 2011 22:03:14

Mr. Numbers:

# Thank you so much, John. ?You know what, Mr. Hurley? ?I'm not a
product spokesman, or a stealth advertiser.

I don't know of anyone who is on this newsgroup.  Don't know why you
keep going there with your comments.

I have switched back to the Nike product line after almost 20 years
running pretty much only on the Asics line.  I did buy one pair of
Asics last year ( latest DS trainer variety ).  I went thru a whole
whole bunch of DS trainers ... but never did like much of anything in
the 21XX series.

Some pretty nice technology in the lunar foam stuff ... if that
rattles your nerves so be it.

# My car, OTOH, requires new tires every 100,000 miles, so Big Shoe
Inc. is up to no good.

Seriously dude if you push your tires to 100,000 miles you are putting
yourself and other people anywhere near you on the road at risk.
Maybe this is just talk or maybe you are pushing pretty much
everything past the normal wear out lifetime.

The more that you push how much mileage you run weekly and the more
that you push how many miles you put a pair of shoes through the more
at risk to injury you are putting yourself.

If however you are really doing almost all your mileage on a treadmill
maybe that is a relevant factor.  I don't run on dreadmills ... but
they may ( depending on model perhaps ) also provide a fair amount of
shock absorption.

People that spend most of their mileage on roads and/or asphalt are
the most at risk.  People that put in a bunch of their mileage on
softer surfaces ( Cleveland metropark west side trails are the best )
somewhat less so.  Not sure where dreadmills fit into the equation ...

 
 
 

My first Half-Marathon!

Post by Charlie Pendej » Thu, 02 Jun 2011 00:55:20

Doug:

Quote:
> They will gladly sell us what we want, over and over and over.....
> How many miles does one get from a pair of 5fingers or 4 oz.
> bottoms with laces? ?I expect $$frequent$$ visits back to the
> store.

You're out to demonize the evil shoe companies that victimize us poor
runners, but to actually answer your question however rhetorically
intended: surely it depends on the shoe and the runner.  The 4 oz
Piranha II (sample size: 2 pair so far) and the 4 oz Wave Universe III
(1 pair) seem to be good for ~1000 miles for me, possibly more.

Intuition might say "skimpier shoe, it'll wear out sooner" but many
minimalists report that's not the case for them.  I suspect it's some
or all of these:

[a] lighter shoe encourages lighter footstrike which yields longer
wear

[b] the other way around: runners with lighter footstrikes choose
minimal shoes

[c] less cushioning when new = less to lose = less change over time

[d] minimal shoes wear more evenly, compared to a 12 oz "support" shoe
where the cushy EVA will wear quickly, the firmer EVA more slowly, and
any plastic support widgets very slowly if at all - so the
support:cushion ratio goes way out of balance over the miles

 
 
 

My first Half-Marathon!

Post by Anthony Walle » Fri, 03 Jun 2011 17:02:56



Good to hear that overall it was a positive experience.

You may want to try out some shorter distance races
before you try your next half-marathon.
You should be able to run at faster speeds for 5k or 10k races.

Anthony.