Switched from heel-toe to forefoot Striker - OUCH!

Switched from heel-toe to forefoot Striker - OUCH!

Post by RB » Thu, 07 Dec 2000 04:00:00


I have just got back into running after many years in hiding. ;^)
I felt pain after 1/4 mile! Went back to my standard heel-toe for a
while. After 1 mile I went back to forefoot and it felt much better.
The last few days my calves have been very sore!!! F$%&ing sore would
be a more apropos description. Is this normal? I actually prefer
forefoot striking (what is the proper running term?) style of running
and want to make a permanent switch.

Regards.

Rob

 
 
 

Switched from heel-toe to forefoot Striker - OUCH!

Post by Steve Freide » Thu, 07 Dec 2000 04:00:00

Focus on leaning forward, feeling your feel strike underneath you as you
run, not in front of, and let your footstrike do whatever it wants to.
The faster you go, the more it will tend to be forefoot striking first.
If that happens, make sure you relax yourself after the footstrike, no
extra tension in the calves trying to keep your heels from landing.

It is art, not science.  Play around and find the right balance for you.

-S-

Quote:

> I have just got back into running after many years in hiding. ;^)
> I felt pain after 1/4 mile! Went back to my standard heel-toe for a
> while. After 1 mile I went back to forefoot and it felt much better.
> The last few days my calves have been very sore!!! F$%&ing sore would
> be a more apropos description. Is this normal? I actually prefer
> forefoot striking (what is the proper running term?) style of running
> and want to make a permanent switch.

> Regards.

> Rob


 
 
 

Switched from heel-toe to forefoot Striker - OUCH!

Post by Aleksi Kolehmaine » Fri, 08 Dec 2000 04:00:00

Make sure that the running shoes you use have a flexible forefoot.
Switching to shoes with more flexible forefoot solved my calf
pains when I switched to forefoot running.

--


 
 
 

Switched from heel-toe to forefoot Striker - OUCH!

Post by Josh Steinber » Tue, 12 Dec 2000 01:18:36

Dear Rob,

    Your calves are going to kill until they get used to handling the
load of forefoot running.  Are you sure this is your natural style?  I
just ask because almost no one else does it.  Back to forefoot running.
Mid/heel-strikers send the impact of each footfall into their knees and
backs, which distributes the forces into those places.  Us forefoot
runners send the force of footfall impact into our calves (triceps
surei, to be more exact).  Up-side:  no more pounding in knees and back
(that's what I benefit from most).  Down-side:  all pounding goes into
calf muscles.  When they adjust to the load, they'll be fine.  Do tons
of achilles stretches that will stretch those calf muscles before and
after runs.
    Best of luck.

-- Josh Steinberg, Syraucse

Quote:

> I have just got back into running after many years in hiding. ;^)
> I felt pain after 1/4 mile! Went back to my standard heel-toe for a
> while. After 1 mile I went back to forefoot and it felt much better.
> The last few days my calves have been very sore!!! F$%&ing sore would
> be a more apropos description. Is this normal? I actually prefer
> forefoot striking (what is the proper running term?) style of running
> and want to make a permanent switch.

> Regards.

> Rob

 
 
 

Switched from heel-toe to forefoot Striker - OUCH!

Post by robHoskin » Wed, 13 Dec 2000 05:43:20



Quote:
> Dear Rob,

> Your calves are going to kill until they get used to handling the
> load of forefoot running.  Are you sure this is your natural style?  I
> just ask because almost no one else does it.  Back to forefoot running.
> Mid/heel-strikers send the impact of each footfall into their knees and
> backs, which distributes the forces into those places.  Us forefoot
> runners send the force of footfall impact into our calves (triceps
> surei, to be more exact).  Up-side:  no more pounding in knees and back
> (that's what I benefit from most).  Down-side:  all pounding goes into
> calf muscles.  When they adjust to the load, they'll be fine.  Do tons
> of achilles stretches that will stretch those calf muscles before and
> after runs.
> Best of luck.

> -- Josh Steinberg, Syraucse

Thank you for this. I've just had an experience switching the other way - I
tend to come down on the ball of my foot. I bought a new pair of shoes last
week and in being fitted I did a run on a treadmill in a few pairs at the
store. The shop assistant noted the strike on the front of the foot and
suggested moving to heel strike. I've done it for a couple of runs and found
that, to use your words, there is "pounding in knees and back". Major
pounding - my knees in particular have been quite sore, and I've never had
knee problems before. So I'm going to switch to my old style running - I've
got very strong calf muscles which seem to handle it comfortably. The main
thing to remember (for anyone thinking of switching to forefoot running)
though is that the calves need a lot of stretching.

Robh
--
"He was a wise man who invented beer."
                            - Plato -

 
 
 

Switched from heel-toe to forefoot Striker - OUCH!

Post by Phil. G. Felt » Thu, 14 Dec 2000 02:08:40

Quote:

> Dear Rob,

>     Your calves are going to kill until they get used to handling the
> load of forefoot running.  Are you sure this is your natural style?  I
> just ask because almost no one else does it.  Back to forefoot running.
> Mid/heel-strikers send the impact of each footfall into their knees and
> backs, which distributes the forces into those places.  Us forefoot
> runners send the force of footfall impact into our calves (triceps
> surei, to be more exact).  Up-side:  no more pounding in knees and back
> (that's what I benefit from most).  Down-side:  all pounding goes into
> calf muscles.  When they adjust to the load, they'll be fine.  Do tons
> of achilles stretches that will stretch those calf muscles before and
> after runs.
>     Best of luck.

Also try to avoid pounding, the foot should be going backawards at time of
impact (clawing the track).  Occasionally some of the sprinters I coach do
this and you can hear the pounding on the track, what you want to hear is a
ripping sound of the spikes gripping the track.  One drill we use is to stand
them next to a wall for support and have them cycle one leg through with a
light brushing on the ground, then swop sides.  It's particularly noticeable
at an indoor track meet, the efficient runners up front run quietly no slapping
noise (not just sprinters).

Phil.

Quote:

> > I have just got back into running after many years in hiding. ;^)
> > I felt pain after 1/4 mile! Went back to my standard heel-toe for a
> > while. After 1 mile I went back to forefoot and it felt much better.
> > The last few days my calves have been very sore!!! F$%&ing sore would
> > be a more apropos description. Is this normal? I actually prefer
> > forefoot striking (what is the proper running term?) style of running
> > and want to make a permanent switch.

> > Regards.

> > Rob

 
 
 

Switched from heel-toe to forefoot Striker - OUCH!

Post by RB » Thu, 14 Dec 2000 03:13:14



Quote:
>Thank you for this. I've just had an experience switching the other way - I
>tend to come down on the ball of my foot. I bought a new pair of shoes last
>week and in being fitted I did a run on a treadmill in a few pairs at the
>store. The shop assistant noted the strike on the front of the foot and
>suggested moving to heel strike. I've done it for a couple of runs and found
>that, to use your words, there is "pounding in knees and back". Major
>pounding - my knees in particular have been quite sore, and I've never had
>knee problems before. So I'm going to switch to my old style running - I've
>got very strong calf muscles which seem to handle it comfortably. The main
>thing to remember (for anyone thinking of switching to forefoot running)
>though is that the calves need a lot of stretching.

Last night I think I may have pulled my calf or strained it about 3K
into my run. Had to walk the remainder.  This style is absolutely
killing my poor calves. I'd go back to a hee-toe running form but it
would just be a matter of time before my back and knee injuries would
come back. Perhaps I'm coming down a bit too much on the front of the
foot. I hope I can recover enough to run in a few days.

Rob

 
 
 

Switched from heel-toe to forefoot Striker - OUCH!

Post by bmcwilli.. » Thu, 14 Dec 2000 10:32:21

Rob, as I've said in here before, I don't think it's wise to blame your
knee/back injuries on your footstrike method. There could be other
things causing your problems that a change in stride won't help. What
exactly *are* the injuries/weaknesses you're trying to fix?

Brian



Quote:


> >Thank you for this. I've just had an experience switching the other
way - I
> >tend to come down on the ball of my foot. I bought a new pair of
shoes last
> >week and in being fitted I did a run on a treadmill in a few pairs
at the
> >store. The shop assistant noted the strike on the front of the foot
and
> >suggested moving to heel strike. I've done it for a couple of runs
and found
> >that, to use your words, there is "pounding in knees and back". Major
> >pounding - my knees in particular have been quite sore, and I've
never had
> >knee problems before. So I'm going to switch to my old style
running - I've
> >got very strong calf muscles which seem to handle it comfortably.
The main
> >thing to remember (for anyone thinking of switching to forefoot
running)
> >though is that the calves need a lot of stretching.

> Last night I think I may have pulled my calf or strained it about 3K
> into my run. Had to walk the remainder.  This style is absolutely
> killing my poor calves. I'd go back to a hee-toe running form but it
> would just be a matter of time before my back and knee injuries would
> come back. Perhaps I'm coming down a bit too much on the front of the
> foot. I hope I can recover enough to run in a few days.

> Rob

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Switched from heel-toe to forefoot Striker - OUCH!

Post by RB » Thu, 14 Dec 2000 21:49:47

On Wed, 13 Dec 2000 01:32:21 GMT, in rec.running

Quote:

>Rob, as I've said in here before, I don't think it's wise to blame your
>knee/back injuries on your footstrike method. There could be other
>things causing your problems that a change in stride won't help. What
>exactly *are* the injuries/weaknesses you're trying to fix?

>Brian

You have misunderstood what the problem is. First of all, my back and
knee problems are a result of old sports-related injuries and not due
to any particular running style. I used to play hockey, football and
lacrosse. I blame my natural *heel-toe* running style for putting too
much stress on my back and knees. I'm attempting to switch to the
forefoot method to reduce this stress. So far this switch has been
successful in taking the stress off my problem areas but unsuccessful
in terms of causing major problems elsewhere (calves). My guess is
that I may be planting the foot more near the toes as I used to when I
was a sprinter. That style may have been OK for a 100 meter race but
not for distance running. There must be a better method that falls
between these two styles.

Regards.

Rob

 
 
 

Switched from heel-toe to forefoot Striker - OUCH!

Post by David Forbe » Sun, 17 Dec 2000 02:08:06

My calves were a bit sore for a short while after switching to a more
mid-foot landing from a definite heel landing.  I have started to do
heel raises to try and strengthen my calves, as well as squats and
lunges. If you have access to Running Research News (Owen Anderson) look
at
Jan-Feb 1999 issue Vol 15 Number 1. Go to http://www.rrnews.com/ where
you can order the article.
Good luck,

Regards,
Dave
**************************************
I'd love to think that there's an end
just waiting right around the bend,
but every turn's a tunnel.
       I descend
I'm the running man...
Edward Ka Spell and kEvin Key,
The Last Man to Fly, 1991
**************************************