How do they synchronize the clocks at different mile markers?

How do they synchronize the clocks at different mile markers?

Post by Brian & Kimberli Mollenkop » Fri, 16 Aug 2002 03:23:51


How do they synchronize the clocks at different mile markers on a given
racecourse?  I don't see them using a two-way radios, they can not use the
sound of the start gun, I don't see a group of people at the start all
grouped together getting the clocks at the same exact time, or I don't see
someone on a bike/car/motorcycle out ahead of the pack.  All the races I
have ran the mile markers are always on sync with my watch.  Just curious.

Brian

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How do they synchronize the clocks at different mile markers?

Post by Brian Jone » Fri, 16 Aug 2002 03:57:17

I always guessed they just set them all when they were all together and then
placed them out on the course.  Dunno.

Brian Jones


Quote:
> How do they synchronize the clocks at different mile markers on a given
> racecourse?  I don't see them using a two-way radios, they can not use the
> sound of the start gun, I don't see a group of people at the start all
> grouped together getting the clocks at the same exact time, or I don't see
> someone on a bike/car/motorcycle out ahead of the pack.  All the races I
> have ran the mile markers are always on sync with my watch.  Just curious.

> Brian

> --
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How do they synchronize the clocks at different mile markers?

Post by CLAUBER » Fri, 16 Aug 2002 06:47:34

That's exactly how they do it in Boston. According to the race director, they
have a van loaded with clocks all synced and hardwired together. When the gun
goes off, one button activates all the clocks, then the van hustles down the
course and drops each one off.

 
 
 

How do they synchronize the clocks at different mile markers?

Post by am » Fri, 16 Aug 2002 07:10:10

The way we do it at our local race is this:

Have the first and second mile clock reader in the lead car they start
the clock when the gun goes off.

The rest of the miles we have a guy go around the course with the
current official times and watches are set from that time.

Andy

On Wed, 14 Aug 2002 14:23:51 -0400, "Brian & Kimberli Mollenkopf"

Quote:

>How do they synchronize the clocks at different mile markers on a given
>racecourse?  I don't see them using a two-way radios, they can not use the
>sound of the start gun, I don't see a group of people at the start all
>grouped together getting the clocks at the same exact time, or I don't see
>someone on a bike/car/motorcycle out ahead of the pack.  All the races I
>have ran the mile markers are always on sync with my watch.  Just curious.

>Brian

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How do they synchronize the clocks at different mile markers?

Post by Mike Tennen » Fri, 16 Aug 2002 22:41:56

Quote:


>> How do they synchronize the clocks at different mile markers on a given
>> racecourse?  I don't see them using a two-way radios, they can not use the
>> sound of the start gun, I don't see a group of people at the start all
>> grouped together getting the clocks at the same exact time, or I don't see
>> someone on a bike/car/motorcycle out ahead of the pack.  All the races I
>> have ran the mile markers are always on sync with my watch.  Just curious.

>> Brian

Ok, as one of the "clockmeisters" in our club, here's how it's easily
done.

First, I assume we're talking about the big digital clocks at the mile
markers, not an individual standing calling out times from a watch.

The big digital clocks can be set for whatever start time you want,
and then started. So all the clocks can be out on the course, in
place, while the "clock setter" is at the start line with his/her stop
watch. When the race starts, they start their watch, then hop in a car
to the first clock, which has already been pre-set for something like
3:30. When their watch (which has the running race time) hits 3:30,
they start that clock, then hop in the car and go onto the next clock,
set and start it to the current running race time, etc.  

There's no need to start them all at the same time, unless you're
absolutely concerned about pinpoint accuracy.  Starting them
individually as outlined may introduce a variation by a second on each
individual clock, but that's pretty insignificant.

In a situation where you don't have clocks, but individuals calling
out times, then you need to have all of them (or their watches) at the
start.

Mike Tennent
"IronPenguin"