4 week 10K Training plan

4 week 10K Training plan

Post by feargal » Wed, 07 Apr 2004 04:53:30


Background: soon-to-be 40 year old male planning to run my first 10K on
03-May. Started training for it in late February and followed a training
plan that advocated building up stamina through alternating short runs with
breaks for walking and recovery, e.g. Run for 4 minutes, walk for 2 equals 6
minutes by 5 repetitions. After 2 weeks of this I did 'something' to my
ankle so haven't felt able to run for the last 2 weeks. Went out today and
managed 10+2+8+2+6 (run 10, walk 2, run 8, etc.) Ankle feels OK

Challenge: 4 weeks to go to the 10Kand I'm way off the training schedule,
i.e. I should be running for 30 minutes without a break at this stage.

Question: Any advice for how I should schedule the next 4 weeks to be able
to run 10K without a break. My goal for this race is completion - I don't
have a target time.

All advice appreciated.

 
 
 

4 week 10K Training plan

Post by C.G. » Wed, 07 Apr 2004 05:28:41

You just need to steadily build up to longer times (possibly by running at a slower pace). Don't
make the mistake of pushing too hard or you run the risk of not being able to run at all.
Be prepared to modify your goals if necessary. If the 10K is the one in the Phoenix Park you can
expect hills. Building up from 10mins uninterrupted to 1 hour or so within 4 weeks is quite a goal
already. Add in the hills and it becomes a real challenge. You may need to walk some of the race.

--
Colm

: Background: soon-to-be 40 year old male planning to run my first 10K on
: 03-May. Started training for it in late February and followed a training
: plan that advocated building up stamina through alternating short runs with
: breaks for walking and recovery, e.g. Run for 4 minutes, walk for 2 equals 6
: minutes by 5 repetitions. After 2 weeks of this I did 'something' to my
: ankle so haven't felt able to run for the last 2 weeks. Went out today and
: managed 10+2+8+2+6 (run 10, walk 2, run 8, etc.) Ankle feels OK
:
: Challenge: 4 weeks to go to the 10Kand I'm way off the training schedule,
: i.e. I should be running for 30 minutes without a break at this stage.
:
: Question: Any advice for how I should schedule the next 4 weeks to be able
: to run 10K without a break. My goal for this race is completion - I don't
: have a target time.
:
: All advice appreciated.
:
:

 
 
 

4 week 10K Training plan

Post by feargal » Wed, 07 Apr 2004 05:53:36

Thanks Colm

Hills ? Now they tell me !

Walking some of the race is a possibility but I still choose to see the
glass as half-full.


Quote:
> You just need to steadily build up to longer times (possibly by running at

a slower pace). Don't
Quote:
> make the mistake of pushing too hard or you run the risk of not being able
to run at all.
> Be prepared to modify your goals if necessary. If the 10K is the one in

the Phoenix Park you can
Quote:
> expect hills. Building up from 10mins uninterrupted to 1 hour or so within

4 weeks is quite a goal
Quote:
> already. Add in the hills and it becomes a real challenge. You may need to

walk some of the race.
Quote:

> --
> Colm




Quote:
> : Background: soon-to-be 40 year old male planning to run my first 10K on
> : 03-May. Started training for it in late February and followed a training
> : plan that advocated building up stamina through alternating short runs
with
> : breaks for walking and recovery, e.g. Run for 4 minutes, walk for 2
equals 6
> : minutes by 5 repetitions. After 2 weeks of this I did 'something' to my
> : ankle so haven't felt able to run for the last 2 weeks. Went out today
and
> : managed 10+2+8+2+6 (run 10, walk 2, run 8, etc.) Ankle feels OK
> :
> : Challenge: 4 weeks to go to the 10Kand I'm way off the training
schedule,
> : i.e. I should be running for 30 minutes without a break at this stage.
> :
> : Question: Any advice for how I should schedule the next 4 weeks to be
able
> : to run 10K without a break. My goal for this race is completion - I
don't
> : have a target time.
> :
> : All advice appreciated.
> :
> :


 
 
 

4 week 10K Training plan

Post by Dot » Wed, 07 Apr 2004 06:16:35

Quote:

> Background: soon-to-be 40 year old male planning to run my first 10K on
> 03-May. Started training for it in late February and followed a training
> plan that advocated building up stamina through alternating short runs with
> breaks for walking and recovery, e.g. Run for 4 minutes, walk for 2 equals 6
> minutes by 5 repetitions. After 2 weeks of this I did 'something' to my
> ankle so haven't felt able to run for the last 2 weeks. Went out today and
> managed 10+2+8+2+6 (run 10, walk 2, run 8, etc.) Ankle feels OK

> Challenge: 4 weeks to go to the 10Kand I'm way off the training schedule,
> i.e. I should be running for 30 minutes without a break at this stage.

> Question: Any advice for how I should schedule the next 4 weeks to be able
> to run 10K without a break. My goal for this race is completion - I don't
> have a target time.

> All advice appreciated.

Let's look at the numbers (and I only have what you posted - no prior
background information). You didn't indicate if you had any earlier
running or fitness type background (like mt biking, xc skiing, etc). You
didn't indicate approximately how far your present routine this gets
you, but for a starting point, I'm going to guess you may take about 1
hr or so (give or take 10 min) for 10k. That means you're about half way
(maybe less) there for duration. You're recovering from an injury that
you seem to have gotten after only 2 wks. A general rule of thumb is to
not increase  your "long" run or weekly duration (or mileage) more than
10% every other week - on average. Generally people may taper a week or
so before a race, where they back off on the volume to recover. This may
or may not be needed in your case. Only you know your recovery time.

That is, you'll end up short on distance / duration almost any way you
train using usual guidelines - which may or may not be appropriate.

Is it only running that causes the problem? Can you walk longer? Is the
topography you're training on similar to what the race will be - flat,
hilly? (Hilly may take more energy but more forgiving of muscle
overuse.) Are you out of breath when you take the walk break? If so,
slowing down the run portion to a conversational pace may make things go
more easily.

If 30 min run/walk (or walk only) is a challenge for you now (not sure
if it's aerobic conditioning or legs/feet being tired), you might want
to consider a 10k later (or maybe a 5k option if one is offered). Or if
you can walk that distance / duration, then just continue building the
run/walk as you've been doing (without the ankle injury), and wing it on
race day with that same ratio. But if you're coming from a sedentary
background with little other activity, I'm not sure that's a good idea.

Note: the walk breaks provide a *lot* of recovery, so it's possible you
*might* be able to build a little faster than a usual running program.
BUT the fact that you were injured within 2 wks of starting a run/walk
program is raising red flags in my eyes. But maybe there's an
explanation, like tripping on a curb or going waay too fast for your level.

I would *NOT* try to make up the missed sessions in your original plan.
Just adjust your goals and perhaps walk more of it than you had
originally planned - at least to start, and see how things feel. Or
postpone. And if you have more experience than what the post suggests,
then you may want to ignore comments.

Just my thoughts. Caveat: I have no 10k running race experience (but
have done longer duration multisport)

Good luck.

Dot

--
"Success is different things to different people"
-Bernd Heinrich in Racing the Antelope

 
 
 

4 week 10K Training plan

Post by feargal » Wed, 07 Apr 2004 07:33:21

Quote:
> If 30 min run/walk (or walk only) is a challenge for you now (not sure
> if it's aerobic conditioning or legs/feet being tired), you might want
> to consider a 10k later (or maybe a 5k option if one is offered). Or if
> you can walk that distance / duration, then just continue building the
> run/walk as you've been doing (without the ankle injury), and wing it on
> race day with that same ratio. But if you're coming from a sedentary
> background with little other activity, I'm not sure that's a good idea.
> Note: the walk breaks provide a *lot* of recovery, so it's possible you
> *might* be able to build a little faster than a usual running program.
> BUT the fact that you were injured within 2 wks of starting a run/walk
> program is raising red flags in my eyes. But maybe there's an
> explanation, like tripping on a curb or going waay too fast for your

level.

Good points and well made.

Yes - am coming from a sedentary background. Ankle swelling flared-up after
2 weeks so approach of running every other day was, on reflection, for my
state too aggressive. Next run is planned for Thursday so will re-assess
goals afterwards.

 
 
 

4 week 10K Training plan

Post by SwStudi » Wed, 07 Apr 2004 12:15:05


Quote:
> Background: soon-to-be 40 year old male planning to run my first 10K on
> 03-May. Started training for it in late February and followed a training
> plan that advocated building up stamina through alternating short runs
with
> breaks for walking and recovery, e.g. Run for 4 minutes, walk for 2 equals
6
> minutes by 5 repetitions. After 2 weeks of this I did 'something' to my
> ankle so haven't felt able to run for the last 2 weeks. Went out today and
> managed 10+2+8+2+6 (run 10, walk 2, run 8, etc.) Ankle feels OK

> Challenge: 4 weeks to go to the 10Kand I'm way off the training schedule,
> i.e. I should be running for 30 minutes without a break at this stage.

> Question: Any advice for how I should schedule the next 4 weeks to be able
> to run 10K without a break. My goal for this race is completion - I don't
> have a target time.

> All advice appreciated.

Don't bite off more than you can chew - your body told you
something, and you risk further injury by stepping up the training.
It's almost certain you will not be able to handle it, based on
what you've provided.

Revise the plan - sign up for a 5k and use the 10k as a training
run/walk... you may suprise yourself and run more of it than you
thought, perhaps all of it; provided you ease up from here on in.
Steady training always wins in the end.

cheers,
--
David (in Hamilton, ON)
www.allfalldown.org
"The most insecure people are the ones you see,
putting other people down constantly."

 
 
 

4 week 10K Training plan

Post by TarfHe » Wed, 05 May 2004 04:05:48

Quote:

> Background: soon-to-be 40 year old male planning to run my first 10K on
> 03-May. Started training for it in late February and followed a training
> plan that advocated building up stamina through alternating short runs with
> breaks for walking and recovery, e.g. Run for 4 minutes, walk for 2 equals 6
> minutes by 5 repetitions. After 2 weeks of this I did 'something' to my
> ankle so haven't felt able to run for the last 2 weeks. Went out today and
> managed 10+2+8+2+6 (run 10, walk 2, run 8, etc.) Ankle feels OK

> Challenge: 4 weeks to go to the 10Kand I'm way off the training schedule,
> i.e. I should be running for 30 minutes without a break at this stage.

> Question: Any advice for how I should schedule the next 4 weeks to be able
> to run 10K without a break. My goal for this race is completion - I don't
> have a target time.

> All advice appreciated.

Since I posted this query 4 weeks ago, I persevered with my approach
of putting as many miles on my legs as I could - 2 lunchtimes per week
and a long run at the weekend. It went less well than I had hoped for.
My longest run had been 42 minutes and that was Sun 18-April. Last
Wednesday was the last preparation run before the 10K and that was an
uncomfortable 39 minutes.
This morning I presented myself at Donore Harriers AC to pick-up my
race number and whiled away the time until the race began at 11:00.
I kept towards the back and found a rhythm which soon had me passing
others. On the 'descent' of Khyber Road I was amused to see the
runners in front of me startled by the local herd of deer charging
across the race route. The long 'ascent' from Chapelizod gate to
Farmleigh was less taxing than I feared. Others dropped their pace
dramatically and there was an increase in the number of walkers.
My principal target for this race was to run the whole 10K. It was at
this point that I was most at risk of stopping running as my
subconscious tends to send stop signals to my legs whenever an
intermediate milestone has been achieved. Today my focus was good and
I was able to sustain the running all the way to the end.

My first 10K.
4 weeks of preparation.
57m30s.
Legs feel like lead.

There is a 10 mile race in August which I may enter. If I do that, or
any other such event again, I am certain that I will not compress it
all into such a short period.

 
 
 

4 week 10K Training plan

Post by andrew smit » Wed, 05 May 2004 05:15:44



Quote:
> > Background: soon-to-be 40 year old male planning to run my first 10K on
> > 03-May. Started training for it in late February and followed a training
> > plan that advocated building up stamina through alternating short runs
with
> > breaks for walking and recovery, e.g. Run for 4 minutes, walk for 2
equals 6
> > minutes by 5 repetitions. After 2 weeks of this I did 'something' to my
> > ankle so haven't felt able to run for the last 2 weeks. Went out today
and
> > managed 10+2+8+2+6 (run 10, walk 2, run 8, etc.) Ankle feels OK

> > Challenge: 4 weeks to go to the 10Kand I'm way off the training
schedule,
> > i.e. I should be running for 30 minutes without a break at this stage.

> > Question: Any advice for how I should schedule the next 4 weeks to be
able
> > to run 10K without a break. My goal for this race is completion - I
don't
> > have a target time.

> > All advice appreciated.

> Since I posted this query 4 weeks ago, I persevered with my approach
> of putting as many miles on my legs as I could - 2 lunchtimes per week
> and a long run at the weekend. It went less well than I had hoped for.
> My longest run had been 42 minutes and that was Sun 18-April. Last
> Wednesday was the last preparation run before the 10K and that was an
> uncomfortable 39 minutes.
> This morning I presented myself at Donore Harriers AC to pick-up my
> race number and whiled away the time until the race began at 11:00.
> I kept towards the back and found a rhythm which soon had me passing
> others. On the 'descent' of Khyber Road I was amused to see the
> runners in front of me startled by the local herd of deer charging
> across the race route. The long 'ascent' from Chapelizod gate to
> Farmleigh was less taxing than I feared. Others dropped their pace
> dramatically and there was an increase in the number of walkers.
> My principal target for this race was to run the whole 10K. It was at
> this point that I was most at risk of stopping running as my
> subconscious tends to send stop signals to my legs whenever an
> intermediate milestone has been achieved. Today my focus was good and
> I was able to sustain the running all the way to the end.

> My first 10K.
> 4 weeks of preparation.
> 57m30s.
> Legs feel like lead.

> There is a 10 mile race in August which I may enter. If I do that, or
> any other such event again, I am certain that I will not compress it
> all into such a short period.

You're doing great!

Just keep running.  By August you'll be *so* ready.

a.

 
 
 

4 week 10K Training plan

Post by Colm » Wed, 05 May 2004 05:38:34

Well? How did it go?

--
Colm


Quote:
> Background: soon-to-be 40 year old male planning to run my first 10K on
> 03-May.

 
 
 

4 week 10K Training plan

Post by C.G. » Wed, 05 May 2004 08:24:22

Sorry. Didn't see your earlier post. Well done on the finish. The 10 miler will be a doddle if you
keep up the training.

--
Colm


: Well? How did it go?

 
 
 

4 week 10K Training plan

Post by rick » Wed, 05 May 2004 23:20:32

You should be comfortable running for an hour- no fatigue or pain.

In many areas of the USA there is a 10K almost every weekend, so rushing
it should not be an issue.