Training week ending Dec 9 2012

Training week ending Dec 9 2012

Post by John Hurle » Wed, 12 Dec 2012 02:19:45


Greetings wreck runners!  Please tell us about your training week and
goals.
 
 
 

Training week ending Dec 9 2012

Post by rms » Wed, 12 Dec 2012 07:57:14

Greetings wreck runners!  Please tell us about your training week and
goals.

    Just a few enjoyable 6-12mi trail jogs here, trying to get more wear on
the shoes I bought during the year but didn't like.  The absence of instep
tread on the MT1010 means I can only wear this pair on short runs, and now I
notice that the upper on both shoes is disintegrating, literally:  Wonder if
TonyS has noticed this yet on his pair.  I had high hopes for this, but with
a major (imho) design flaw and big QA issues, it's like they went from
computer render to manufacturing with no testing in-between :)

rms

 
 
 

Training week ending Dec 9 2012

Post by John Hurle » Wed, 12 Dec 2012 08:00:57

# Please tell us about your training week

Yet another busy week ( been a hectic year ) typical running 6 days on
1 off maybe 45 miles total.

No firm plans for anything yet ... slept in this weekend and missed
one of the last local races for 2012.

Good luck all!

 
 
 

Training week ending Dec 9 2012

Post by John Hurle » Wed, 12 Dec 2012 08:03:12

Roger:

#?The absence of instep tread on the MT1010 means I can only wear this
pair on short runs, and now I notice that the upper on both shoes is
disintegrating, literally:

What kind of surface cloth?

My shoes get abused pretty badly with getting wet and muddy and I
think that helps contribute to a faster breaking down of outer
materials.

 
 
 

Training week ending Dec 9 2012

Post by rms » Wed, 12 Dec 2012 08:22:16

# The absence of instep tread on the MT1010 means I can only wear this
pair on short runs, and now I notice that the upper on both shoes is
disintegrating, literally:

Quote:
>What kind of surface cloth?

    A thin, fine-weave fabric, that's tearing at creases and where overlays
attach; a common complaint on irunfar forums.  I like fine-weave outers, as
they immediately reject gravel that 'chain-link' type outer fabrics let
through; I'm sure New Balance will fix that, but mine is the only 'floating
arch' no-tread-on-the-instep complaint I've seen, and I doubt they'll
re-tool the outsole just for me :)  Won't be buying this model again.

rms

 
 
 

Training week ending Dec 9 2012

Post by Bart Mathia » Wed, 12 Dec 2012 12:13:28

On Mon, 10 Dec 2012 09:19:45 -0800 (PST)

Quote:

> Greetings wreck runners!  Please tell us about your training week and
> goals.

Another weird week for me. (I haven't been reporting them.)

I had been getting over a sore knee enough to start my regular maintenance
week's worth of running (the incredible 26K total), but my thigh started
hurting the last hour of a Wednesday hike several weeks back, and it hasn't
quite stopped full-time yet. (I suspect it means I need to stop hopping down
every drop in the trail that is just a little too high to step down.) I did
manage to get my running-with-walk-breaks *time* back up, roughly three
hours a week (with four to six hours hiking, a fair amount on my feet for a
man old beyond his years), but not the distance, because of the repeated
walk breaks with probably never a full kilometer between.

Then last week the Sunday before the Honolulu Marathon there was the annual
SAM's 5K. I volunteered to help out pre-race, so I thought I might give it a
try, probably walking quite a bit of it.

Wanted to walk after maybe a hundred steps, but decided to run a little
farther first, and then a little farther, and OK maybe just a little bit
farther. Ended up running the whole thing without walking a step. It still
took me within five seconds of 30 minutes, but good for 1st of four in M75-79.

The week in question (in the Subject line) I was back to a shortened Tuesday
run in the normal 50-some minutes. Friday, did the routine 5K(+) and ran the
whole thing, 36 minutes. Only the second time I had "run" that far in at least
four months.

I always sign up for Honolulu, even though I have no intention of running it.
The early fee for residents was a dollar a mile, so I forked over $26.20 way
back when, and went to packet pickup just for the fun of it on Friday.
I considered maybe joining the race for the first 10K, from which point it
would be only about a mile walk home; good excuse to get up before 3am.

Saturday I started thinking maybe I could walk a lot of it and claim a nifty
40th anniversary finisher's T-shirt after say seven hours of that. So when I
really did get up early Sunday and went to the start line, I took that 10K
real easy, just in case I decided to push on. Ten K in 1:12, and didn't
hurt yet, so I did push on. By 15K, at another good drop-out point, I had been
hurting a while, more during the walking than the jogging, but the jogging
was starting to hurt too. I knew it would only get worse for another four or
six hours, so I sadly turned left, unpinning my bib, where everyone else
turned right.

But that did manage to add about another 19K of moving on foot to my week.

Time to really start preparing for the Great Aloha Run in February. I don't
want to be super-slow for that one.
--

 
 
 

Training week ending Dec 9 2012

Post by Tony » Wed, 12 Dec 2012 14:17:57


Quote:
> # The absence of instep tread on the MT1010 means I can only wear this
> pair on short runs, and now I notice that the upper on both shoes is
> disintegrating, literally:

>> What kind of surface cloth?

>     A thin, fine-weave fabric, that's tearing at creases and where
> overlays attach; a common complaint on irunfar forums.  I like
> fine-weave outers, as they immediately reject gravel that 'chain-link'
> type outer fabrics let through; I'm sure New Balance will fix that, but
> mine is the only 'floating arch' no-tread-on-the-instep complaint I've
> seen, and I doubt they'll re-tool the outsole just for me :)  Won't be
> buying this model again.

> rms

The uppers on my MT1010s are holding up so far, but I only wear them
once or twice a week. My shoes of choice right now seem to be the
Saucony Peregrine. I like the MT1010s but not for long runs, and I much
prefer the solid-sheet *** treads on the Peregrines, and the MT110s
split ***/foam tread is fine also. I doubt I will get another pair of
MT1010s, but I'll see if they try to improve it. Still working through
shoe inventory: also want to try the newer Peregrines.

--
http://SportToday.org/

 
 
 

Training week ending Dec 9 2012

Post by Tony » Wed, 12 Dec 2012 14:21:45

20:39, 6200' climb, about 40% vigorous hiking, 35% easy hiking, and 25%
trail running. Unexpected extra time and fun week overall.

--
http://tonyoutthere.blogspot.com/

 
 
 

Training week ending Dec 9 2012

Post by Doug Frees » Wed, 12 Dec 2012 14:50:02


Quote:
> Greetings wreck runners!  Please tell us about your training week and
> goals.

Just starting to ramp back up after some weeks of easy junk after a trail
marathon last month.  It's amazing how the body responds to a rest break.

Goals:
Some or all of a Fat Ass 50k Jan 5. We do it as a long run,  each person
picking their distance. A 5k loop done 1 to 10 times. Its more fun than it
sounds.
HAT 50k March in Maryland. Will be #16

-Doug

 
 
 

Training week ending Dec 9 2012

Post by rms » Fri, 14 Dec 2012 10:43:45

I had been getting over a sore knee enough to start my regular maintenance
week's worth of running (the incredible 26K total), but my thigh started
hurting the last hour of a Wednesday hike several weeks back, and it hasn't
quite stopped full-time yet. (I suspect it means I need to stop hopping down
every drop in the trail that is just a little too high to step down.)

    I'm finding that maintaining 'correct posture' -- which I interpret to
mean keeping the back+femurs more or less in a straight line and
perpendicular to the surface -- more important than anything else in my
running form (And by 'more important' I mean in terms of hip
flexor/knee/lower back pain.  How exactly are you handling sharp drops or
rises?  Are you jack-knifing your body and leaning over to visually
supervise the step?

An example for me is when, during a climb, I encounter a rock that has to be
jumped up over.  So, in the extreme case, do I lean over, lift one leg to
the the top of the rock, maybe putting a hand on it as well, and lift my
whole body up on that leg, with the off-leg sort of keeping me from falling
over?  I find this method really irritates the hip flexor and itb on the
lifting leg something awful, since you are lifting the leg while bent over
from the hip, and the sharp angles involved are dragging the tendon over
bony protrusions on the femur (or that's what I'm picturing).

Or, while keeping the torso vertical, do I lift the upper leg to clear the
rock while leaping up on the bottom leg, which is nearly in a straight line
with the torso?  This method is much less painful for me, but I have remind
myself every time to leap up with a straight back and not lean over to drag
myself up.

rms

 
 
 

Training week ending Dec 9 2012

Post by John Hurle » Sat, 15 Dec 2012 10:01:40


Quote:
> I had been getting over a sore knee enough to start my regular maintenance
> week's worth of running (the incredible 26K total), but my thigh started
> hurting the last hour of a Wednesday hike several weeks back, and it hasn't
> quite stopped full-time yet. (I suspect it means I need to stop hopping down
> every drop in the trail that is just a little too high to step down.)

> ? ? I'm finding that maintaining 'correct posture' -- which I interpret to
> mean keeping the back+femurs more or less in a straight line and
> perpendicular to the surface -- more important than anything else in my
> running form (And by 'more important' I mean in terms of hip
> flexor/knee/lower back pain. ?How exactly are you handling sharp drops or
> rises? ?Are you jack-knifing your body and leaning over to visually
> supervise the step?

> An example for me is when, during a climb, I encounter a rock that has to be
> jumped up over. ?So, in the extreme case, do I lean over, lift one leg to
> the the top of the rock, maybe putting a hand on it as well, and lift my
> whole body up on that leg, with the off-leg sort of keeping me from falling
> over? ?I find this method really irritates the hip flexor and itb on the
> lifting leg something awful, since you are lifting the leg while bent over
> from the hip, and the sharp angles involved are dragging the tendon over
> bony protrusions on the femur (or that's what I'm picturing).

> Or, while keeping the torso vertical, do I lift the upper leg to clear the
> rock while leaping up on the bottom leg, which is nearly in a straight line
> with the torso? ?This method is much less painful for me, but I have remind
> myself every time to leap up with a straight back and not lean over to drag
> myself up.

> rms

How old are you exactly roger?

It seems that really like tough terrain for some reason.

I guess I can think of two main approaches to help you:

1) spend time building muscles and cross training and get everything
stronger

That probably means core strength exercises and some weights and maybe
some swimming and cycling.

2) spend less time on terrain that your musculature tells you that it
has problems with

 
 
 

Training week ending Dec 9 2012

Post by Bart Mathia » Sat, 15 Dec 2012 11:33:14

On Wed, 12 Dec 2012 18:43:45 -0700

Quote:

>> I had been getting over a sore knee enough to start my regular maintenance
>> week's worth of running (the incredible 26K total), but my thigh started
>> hurting the last hour of a Wednesday hike several weeks back, and it hasn't
>> quite stopped full-time yet. (I suspect it means I need to stop hopping down
>> every drop in the trail that is just a little too high to step down.)

>     I'm finding that maintaining 'correct posture' -- which I interpret to
> mean keeping the back+femurs more or less in a straight line and
> perpendicular to the surface -- more important than anything else in my
> running form (And by 'more important' I mean in terms of hip
> flexor/knee/lower back pain.  How exactly are you handling sharp drops or
> rises?  Are you jack-knifing your body and leaning over to visually
> supervise the step?

I'm certainly watching where I'm going to land, and do so with my knees bent
slightly, and I'm bound to be bending forward a bit anyway, because I'm not
trail running but hiking with a heavy backpack. (Not really heavy, I found
out to my surprise when I weighed it recently, but with a full camelback and
lunch 15# is heavy enough for me.)

I never jump over rocks when hiking. Maybe up onto them in rare cases.
--

 
 
 

Training week ending Dec 9 2012

Post by Tony » Sat, 15 Dec 2012 11:41:27


Quote:

>> I had been getting over a sore knee enough to start my regular maintenance
>> week's worth of running (the incredible 26K total), but my thigh started
>> hurting the last hour of a Wednesday hike several weeks back, and it hasn't
>> quite stopped full-time yet. (I suspect it means I need to stop hopping down
>> every drop in the trail that is just a little too high to step down.)

>>      I'm finding that maintaining 'correct posture' -- which I interpret to
>> mean keeping the back+femurs more or less in a straight line and
>> perpendicular to the surface -- more important than anything else in my
>> running form (And by 'more important' I mean in terms of hip
>> flexor/knee/lower back pain.  How exactly are you handling sharp drops or
>> rises?  Are you jack-knifing your body and leaning over to visually
>> supervise the step?

>> An example for me is when, during a climb, I encounter a rock that has to be
>> jumped up over.  So, in the extreme case, do I lean over, lift one leg to
>> the the top of the rock, maybe putting a hand on it as well, and lift my
>> whole body up on that leg, with the off-leg sort of keeping me from falling
>> over?  I find this method really irritates the hip flexor and itb on the
>> lifting leg something awful, since you are lifting the leg while bent over
>> from the hip, and the sharp angles involved are dragging the tendon over
>> bony protrusions on the femur (or that's what I'm picturing).

>> Or, while keeping the torso vertical, do I lift the upper leg to clear the
>> rock while leaping up on the bottom leg, which is nearly in a straight line
>> with the torso?  This method is much less painful for me, but I have remind
>> myself every time to leap up with a straight back and not lean over to drag
>> myself up.

>> rms

> How old are you exactly roger?

> It seems that really like tough terrain for some reason.

> I guess I can think of two main approaches to help you:

> 1) spend time building muscles and cross training and get everything
> stronger

> That probably means core strength exercises and some weights and maybe
> some swimming and cycling.

> 2) spend less time on terrain that your musculature tells you that it
> has problems with

The more gnarly the terrain the better, I say, not only for the fun of
it, but also because it works the whole body more. I'm constantly
adjusting my stride and foot placements not only according to the
terrain, but according to how various parts of my body are reacting to
the stresses. Can't do that as effectively on smooth even ground.

If, for example, the top of my right foot is sore, I might adjust my
right foot placements to avoid pressure on the outside of the foot
plant. Once I file that request into the 'active motion strategy' it's
fairly easy, and my running line alters automatically also to choose
ground or rocks that will better accommodate that need, all without
conscious thought, which is good because that ground moves by pretty
fast sometimes!

John you should come out hiking with me sometime when you're to or from
NYC. Great hiking terrain around here, and when you said a few months
ago you never really hiked before... Anyway standing invitation, just
email me.

--
http://tonyoutthere.blogspot.com/

 
 
 

Training week ending Dec 9 2012

Post by John Hurle » Sun, 16 Dec 2012 11:29:35

Tony:

# John you should come out hiking with me sometime when you're to or
from NYC.

Sounds like a good idea but no idea on when exactly.

Going back and forth from Ohio to Fordham ( Bronx NY ) takes a lot of
driving.  Did that twice this fall ... once to drop off my daughter at
school and once for parent weekend visit trip.

As good as doing some running on trails around there sounds ... and it
sounds very good ... the time available is unfortunately very limited
and family commitments take a much higher priority.

"Maybe one of these years ... " is probably as much as I can say ...

By the time I start on the way back to Ohio ... I just want to get
back to Ohio ... and it takes 7 1/2 hours of concentrated driving to
get back home.

I have found some places to run back and forth from the hotel in
Elmsford NY but that's about all I can say about NY running.