?? 1st Marathon Training Program

?? 1st Marathon Training Program

Post by Occupa » Fri, 10 Jan 1997 04:00:00


I am 29, and have been running for about 10 months now.  I have been
running about 15 to 20 miles per week.  I recently ran a 10K in 57:55.
I am interested in starting to train for a marathon before I turn 30,
just as a goal, in August.  If anyone has any suggested routines I
should follow to insure my preparation, I would appreciate the advice.

D. Hart

 
 
 

?? 1st Marathon Training Program

Post by Rodney Col » Fri, 10 Jan 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

> I am 29, and have been running for about 10 months now.  I have been
> running about 15 to 20 miles per week.  I recently ran a 10K in 57:55.
> I am interested in starting to train for a marathon before I turn 30,
> just as a goal, in August.  If anyone has any suggested routines I
> should follow to insure my preparation, I would appreciate the advice.

> D. Hart

Hi. I am training for my first marathon this April for my 40th
birthday. There are lots of theories - check out the Marine Corp.
marathon web page. To my mind none make nearly as much sense as
the training ideas laid out in "Galloway's Book on Running."
So far things are working fine, I'm up to 18 mile runs at slightly
better than a 9 minute/mile pace, without any real aches or pains.

Jeff Galloway's training advice, if the goal is to finish, is
simple. To start with, to train to race 26 miles you need to
have trained at 26 miles. You also need lots of rest to recover
from long or hard runs. The most important thing is to run a long
slow run every other week, each about 2 miles longer than the last,
with at least one 26 miler, and no long runs within about 3 weeks
of the race. On the off weeks do a run at half the length of the
last long run. Only increase weekly milage by 5-10% per week, on
average. You should not do back to back hard/long runs, and you
should not do back to back hard/long weeks. The weeks should go like:
long, decrease by 30%, longer, decrease by 50%, longer yet, drop
by 30%, ... with the drop 50% weeks being very easy to give full
recovery. So the weeks might go like:
20 miles, 14 mile, 22 miles, 11 miles, 24 miles, 17 miles, 26 miles,
13 miles... Given 6 months of this will work you to plenty of weekly
miles.

At first I found it hard to drop back the 30% much less the 50%,
but my weak link (left knee) told me to do it anyway and I have not
had any trouble with my knee in weeks (knock on wood).

Given the amount of effort it will take to run a marathon, the $15
or so for the book is a minor cost, so I'd recommend you pick up
a copy. Also, don't save money on your shoes.

Good luck (and the same to me!)

- Rod

 
 
 

?? 1st Marathon Training Program

Post by Kenneth Burres M » Sat, 11 Jan 1997 04:00:00



Quote:

>> I am 29, and have been running for about 10 months now.  I have been
>> running about 15 to 20 miles per week.  I recently ran a 10K in 57:55.
>> I am interested in starting to train for a marathon before I turn 30,
>> just as a goal, in August.  If anyone has any suggested routines I
>> should follow to insure my preparation, I would appreciate the advice.

>I've been using Galloway's training formulas since September (Galloway's Book on
>Running and Marathon) and have had very significant success. I'm 43, was 45 pounds
>overweight by conservative standards, and wasn't getting any significant running or
>aerobic exercize in the past year. My weight is down 37 pounds, in spite of a recent
>hysterectomy and the holidays.

>After 4 months running with Galloway as a "coach", I ran with a friend that is a
>seasoned marathoner (more than 8 4 hour marathons under his laces) and 5K racer
>that has been coming back off of injuries for the past year.

>S. was feeling good about his running, and was up to running about 30 miles a week.
>Our run was in the mountains (900 feet of elevation gain in a distance of about 2.5
>miles total) and was just over 7.5 miles. I came out of it much better than he did,
>(I was ready for 4 or 5 more miles and he was exhaused) and sent him home with my
>copy of Galloway's Marathon. Part of the difference was my recent focus on hill work.

>His comment was "whatever you are doing, I'm going to start doing it too". When we
>discussed our training, there were some stark differences. We are close in age, but
>of the two of us, I had thought he'd be dragging me along the trail, because he has
>run so well and consistantly over the years. He has been my running inspiration;
>still is. I had been running alone, because I didn't want to hold anyone up, but
>his bemused chuckling assured me that I don't need to worry about holding most
>runners up. Not for long training runs. I still can't sprint fast.

>The neatest part is that, using Galloways training schedule, he wants train to run
>my first marathon with me this summer! He didn't believe that anyone would be able to
>get to marathon shape that quickly, but looking at the Galloway charts, realized that
>it couldbe done. It's a different way of running, training, than he's used for the
>past 25 years. Even his wife (a hiker who never felt she could "really" run) is going
>to give it a try.

>Jeff Galloway, thanks again!

>Linda
>Gilroy, California

 Try a software solution--
free trail, UltraCoach
gives you specific workouts for running a marathon interactive using AI for your fitness level,
goal, performance

 
 
 

?? 1st Marathon Training Program

Post by Linda Cowle » Tue, 14 Jan 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

> I am 29, and have been running for about 10 months now.  I have been
> running about 15 to 20 miles per week.  I recently ran a 10K in 57:55.
> I am interested in starting to train for a marathon before I turn 30,
> just as a goal, in August.  If anyone has any suggested routines I
> should follow to insure my preparation, I would appreciate the advice.

I've been using Galloway's training formulas since September (Galloway's Book on
Running and Marathon) and have had very significant success. I'm 43, was 45 pounds
overweight by conservative standards, and wasn't getting any significant running or
aerobic exercize in the past year. My weight is down 37 pounds, in spite of a recent
hysterectomy and the holidays.

After 4 months running with Galloway as a "coach", I ran with a friend that is a
seasoned marathoner (more than 8 4 hour marathons under his laces) and 5K racer
that has been coming back off of injuries for the past year.

S. was feeling good about his running, and was up to running about 30 miles a week.
Our run was in the mountains (900 feet of elevation gain in a distance of about 2.5
miles total) and was just over 7.5 miles. I came out of it much better than he did,
(I was ready for 4 or 5 more miles and he was exhaused) and sent him home with my
copy of Galloway's Marathon. Part of the difference was my recent focus on hill work.

His comment was "whatever you are doing, I'm going to start doing it too". When we
discussed our training, there were some stark differences. We are close in age, but
of the two of us, I had thought he'd be dragging me along the trail, because he has
run so well and consistantly over the years. He has been my running inspiration;
still is. I had been running alone, because I didn't want to hold anyone up, but
his bemused chuckling assured me that I don't need to worry about holding most
runners up. Not for long training runs. I still can't sprint fast.

The neatest part is that, using Galloways training schedule, he wants train to run
my first marathon with me this summer! He didn't believe that anyone would be able to
get to marathon shape that quickly, but looking at the Galloway charts, realized that
it couldbe done. It's a different way of running, training, than he's used for the
past 25 years. Even his wife (a hiker who never felt she could "really" run) is going
to give it a try.

Jeff Galloway, thanks again!

Linda
Gilroy, California

 
 
 

?? 1st Marathon Training Program

Post by Mark W. Volkman » Mon, 20 Jan 1997 04:00:00

I was hoping someone might be able to shed some light on an injury which
has me a bit puzzled. I'm a 30 yr old male in good shape - 6'2", 175lbs.
I've been bumping my running mileage up and in recent weeks have been
between 70 and 95 miles per week. Last monday, about an hour into the run
I noticed an annoying little pain round my Left SI joint and deep in my
left glute where it attaches to the superior iliac crest. Within 15
minutes the pain was pretty severe and I had to stop. I iced immediately
and within an hour could hardly walk. Upon planting my left heel on the
ground walking a sharp pain in the area I described above occured. After
two days of icing and 600mg of ibuprofen 3 or 4 times a day, it got a
little better and stabilzed so that I can walk almost normally, but still
can sense the same pain, albeit at a lower level. I'm a sports massage
therapist and work almost exclusively with runners, but have never seen
anything quite like this. I was hoping someone might have an idea as to
what some probable diagnosis might be... If anyone thinks it might be SI
joint dysfunction because of a ligement strain - any healing shortcuts
someone is aware of?
Looking forward to some ideas !

Best Regards,

Mark Volkmann

 
 
 

?? 1st Marathon Training Program

Post by Linda Cowle » Thu, 23 Jan 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

> I was hoping someone might be able to shed some light on an injury which
> has me a bit puzzled. ...  Last monday, about an hour into the run
> I noticed an annoying little pain round my Left SI joint and deep in my
> left glute where it attaches to the superior iliac crest. Within 15
> minutes the pain was pretty severe and I had to stop. I iced immediately
> and within an hour could hardly walk. Upon planting my left heel on the
> ground walking a sharp pain in the area I described above occured.

Mark, could this pain be the result of an inflamed sciatic nerve? I've had "sciatica"
when I've jolted a hip with a bad step (such as would happen if your heel slipped
sharply forward in mud) and misaligned my sacroilliac, and this can be very painful,
with the pain often shooting from the SI down the rear-outside of the leg. Walking nd
running are uncomfortable, and one leg often feels "shorter" than the other.

I get my re-set at the chiropractors and I'm good as new. Stretching is particularly
important for me after getting adjusted so that muscles don't pull me out again.

Linda

 
 
 

?? 1st Marathon Training Program

Post by Joseph Ho » Fri, 24 Jan 1997 04:00:00

I also would recommend the Galloway method to people.  Though I must
caution you to tailor it to your needs.  Jeff himself mentioned in a
seminar I attended that it is run a mile, walk a minute for the
marathon. (Get his book on running for training schedules, etc.)  Some
people I have met have modified the tactic to run ten minutes, walk a
minute or to run five minutes, walk one minute.  I tired the run a mile,
walk a minute.  Did okay.  See what works for you.  Good luck.
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