XC Summer Endurance-Base Training

XC Summer Endurance-Base Training

Post by Jim Vermeul » Sun, 21 May 1995 04:00:00


I am a high school XC coach for boys/girls. The team will train individually
or in running groups in July/August, preparing for opening invitationals in
September. Those races are flat courses, with hill course coming later in the
seaon and during championships in late October/early November. Any tips for
summer training that will not leave us too slow in September and tired by
October?

Appreciated,
Jim Vermeulen

 
 
 

XC Summer Endurance-Base Training

Post by cm4.. » Mon, 22 May 1995 04:00:00

We use a "point" system where our athletes training on their own can stay
in shape.  The system emphasizes running and stretching, but also allows
room for cross training with bicycling, aerobic machines, ... etc.  This
type of idea gives the competitive runners a chance to build a strong
running base, while allowing the "recreational" runners to stay in
shape.  So, it's the best of both worlds.  This is a 10-week program.  
Mileage is dependent upon the individual, however, the men usuall build
to 70 miles/week, while the women get into the 50s ... some higher, some
lower.  Good luck.

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Asst. Cross Country Coach       ! I believe when you are in any         !
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XC Summer Endurance-Base Training

Post by d.. » Thu, 25 May 1995 04:00:00

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>Subject: XC Summer Endurance-Base Training
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>I am a high school XC coach for boys/girls. The team will train individually
>or in running groups in July/August, preparing for opening invitationals in
>September. Those races are flat courses, with hill course coming later in the
>seaon and during championships in late October/early November. Any tips for
>summer training that will not leave us too slow in September and tired by
>October?
>Appreciated,
>Jim Vermeulen

At that age on this side of the atlantic I was training for 800/1500 (3000
flat /sc in my senior years) at this time of year aiming to peak for
championships in november /december so was doing  one strenght sesion (300-800
m reps with short rec) and one speed sesion (150 -300m long rec fast) a week
in a program of less than 30miles a week including some racing on the track
the disaplines are diffrent but complimentry at that age you should run both (
i never ran more than 35-40 miles untill I was 19)  this should change into 2
strenght sesions and a long run in late july/ august on your secedule  
building the distance up towards the championships but still doing some
strength work and some hill work ( realays were always fun and my coach used
them a lot) the speed work done early on will still give you enough of a kick
in october/november you should not be even if you are fealing tierd by oct (
you should be if you are doing enough endurance work) a few days rest before
the big race will be enough to recover ( you will find recovery times come
down a lot with training)  or even take 1-2 weaks off at the beging of
september. remeber xc-races are more about strength than out and out speed
build speed for the track then strength/endurance for the country and you will
find that you are stronger on the track than you were (running splits closer
to your flat out times) and have the nack of running fast on that last 200m
straight on the country. This is the way I always trained and I had some
succes from it .

good luck!

 
 
 

XC Summer Endurance-Base Training

Post by Jonathan Ploud » Thu, 25 May 1995 04:00:00

Quote:

>We use a "point" system where our athletes training on their own can stay
>in shape.  The system emphasizes running and stretching, but also allows
>room for cross training with bicycling, aerobic machines, ... etc.  This
>type of idea gives the competitive runners a chance to build a strong
>running base, while allowing the "recreational" runners to stay in
>shape.  So, it's the best of both worlds.  This is a 10-week program.  
>Mileage is dependent upon the individual, however, the men usuall build
>to 70 miles/week, while the women get into the 50s ... some higher, some
>lower.  Good luck.

That might be fine for college runners but I think it is way too many
miles for almost all high school runners. Even if they all did serious
amounts of cross training, they would be working too hard too soon for a
fall cross country season. How long are the races? If they are 5K like
they are in Washington, it seems like 50-70 miles/week is overkill.

 It seems to me that the most important aspect of summer training for high
school students is not mileage but rather consistency. You want the
runners getting out for solid runs 4-6 times a week just like they will be
doing during the season. They should be building endurance and a base from
which to sharpen during the season. Unless they are already training at 50
miles a week, there is no way they could (healthfully) ramp up to 70
miles, or even 50 miles a week. I'd say getting up to 30-40 miles a week
by the end of the summer is a better goal for most of the athletes

        Jonathan

 
 
 

XC Summer Endurance-Base Training

Post by Nicolaus Zimm » Fri, 26 May 1995 04:00:00


Quote:
>I am a high school XC coach for boys/girls. The team will train individually
>or in running groups in July/August, preparing for opening invitationals in
>September. Those races are flat courses, with hill course coming later in the
>seaon and during championships in late October/early November. Any tips for
>summer training that will not leave us too slow in September and tired by
>October?

>Appreciated,
>Jim Vermeulen

The general philosophy is to do the strength and endurance type training
in the first part of the year and to train faster as the year goes
along.  I would suggest your athletes build their mileage up to about
30-40 miles per week.  By slowly I mean over the course of a month to a
month and a half.  It really isn't necessary for the kids to run more
than this as they are just kids.  If their mileage gets too high they can
experience injury.  As part of their summer base mileage they need to
have a weekly long run of anywhere from 5-8 miles depending on the
mileage for the week.  Running over hilly terrain would not hurt either.
No specific hill workouts per say until the season starts however.
Remember is really isn't all that important to run fast at the beginning
of the season but at the end of the season.

I hope that these few words are helpful.  If you have any questions don't

Nic

"The race is not always to the swift, but to those who keep on running."
--unknown

 
 
 

XC Summer Endurance-Base Training

Post by JEFF L. OBL » Sat, 27 May 1995 04:00:00

Quote:


>>I am a high school XC coach for boys/girls. The team will train individually
>>or in running groups in July/August, preparing for opening invitationals in
>>September. Those races are flat courses, with hill course coming later in the
>>seaon and during championships in late October/early November. Any tips for
>>summer training that will not leave us too slow in September and tired by
>>October?

>>Appreciated,
>>Jim Vermeulen

 I have only been out of HS Cross Counrty for a year so I remember quite
well what we did for the summer.  We started out with low mileage (sp?) for
the first couple weeks and then upped it a mille everyother week. We would
run in the evenings due to the wonderful Florida weather. We ended up
running between 45-50 miles a week. Of course we ran 7 days a week from the
beginning without fail.  We also ran as a team through out the summer except
for a few Saturdays and Sundays.  The people who say you should be at 30-40
miles at the end of the summer (IMHO) are a bit below the par.  Our team has
won 4 state championchips and 2 second place finishes over the past six
years.  The average point difference for the wins was 35 points and we only
lost by less than 15.  There's my 2cents worth.
        Jeff
 
 
 

XC Summer Endurance-Base Training

Post by Coach H » Tue, 30 May 1995 04:00:00

Jeff,
First what are your team's goals. If you are building a program from the
"ground level" lower the miles and focus on Dedication to running and
being an athlete 24 hours a day. Stress nutrition, rest, ect. If you are
coaching older experienced runners who are already running then more miles
is satisfactory. The Runner from Florida said it best. More miles means
more speed and more strength. Arthur Lydiard (sp?) was the great New
Zealand coach who had athletes win every distance race at the olympics
from the 800m to the marathon. He has many books out there about distance
training. Distance will not hurt runners. What hurts runners is the speed
in which they run it and what they run it on.
I coach a boys team. We stress summer conditioning as a team. We run
almost all of our summer miles on trails. The varsity team will reach
55-65 miles a week. Our longest run of the week will be 12-13 miles in
August. Shape the workouts for the kids, we have three levels of running
in our program. A runner who reaches the varsity level has passed through
the other levels over the years so it takes years to build up to the
miles. (Last year we had 11 runners break 17:00 minutes in 5-k  cross
country meets in Ohio) Beware of speed workout in the summer - really look
at Lydiard's work. You can't go wrong.
Good luck!
 
 
 

XC Summer Endurance-Base Training

Post by Richard Barre » Wed, 31 May 1995 04:00:00

Bob Kennedy ran 30 miles per week while in high school. This got him the
Kinney (now Foot Locker) national cross country championship, and later
that year a 4:10 mile. The summer before he started college he ran 60 miles
per week, and won the NCAA cross country championship. Granted your results
may be different :) but the point is mega mileage in high school is not
always necessary. Cross training should certainly include chasing girls.
Staying healthy and having fun should be emphasized. Then in college you
can become serious if you'd like.

  "Remember when this was fun?"

       - Brian Baxter, freshman at IU, hunkered over after an especially
         tough workout.

Richard

 
 
 

XC Summer Endurance-Base Training

Post by Robert J. Racus » Wed, 31 May 1995 04:00:00

You need to be careful, especially with highschool age runners, about
too much mileage which can lead to injuries. I learned this the hard
way... several times. I had two stress fractures and multiple other
injuries that happened over the summer trying to do too much too soon.
What's helped me now is gradually building up the mileage and
supplementing it with LOTS of cross training (biking, swimming,
aquajogging and weight training). At one point over the summer I was
doing three hours every day of total exercise. It got me the volume
without so much pounding. I worked up to running six days a week. This
worked pretty well for me; I was recently third in the NCAA Div III
Finals with a one minute PR of 36:27.
Just my two cents
Jessica Racusin (I'm borrowing my dad's account)