Allergy

Allergy

Post by Shad » Sat, 26 Oct 2002 05:59:19


Hi. Started training for my first marathon in May. Slated to run it in
January. Am really starting to get into it. I'm dreading one thing,
though. I have all intentions of continuing to run year round, but in
Feb/Mar, I always come down with the crummiest allergic reaction to
oak pollen, which is everywhere in my home of Central Florida during
spring. It's not so much the normal itchy and runny nose and eyes I'm
worried about; it's more the chest-cold-type symptoms I get when I'm
breathing hard for extended periods during that time. Any advice? I'd
hate to have to do the treadmill thing for a month or six weeks.
Thanks.
 
 
 

Allergy

Post by TopCouns » Sat, 26 Oct 2002 06:51:49

Quote:
>it's more the chest-cold-type symptoms I get when I'm
>breathing hard for extended periods during that time. Any advice?

Been there, done that.  My doctor gives me prescriptions for:  (1) an Albuterol
inhaler; and (2) Prednisone tablets.  Also, sometimes Guaifenesin, either
presecription as "Guaifenesin LA" or non-prescription as Robitussin (NOT "DM").
 I must warn you, though, that you will lose weight with the Albuterol inhaler,
as it ups your heart rate and gives your hands a sometimes irritating tremor.
these 3 things will prevent a respiratory fluid build-up by helping you cough
it out as it develops.  Good luck.  You CAN run through this; I do.  Remember
that coughing is your friend, not your enemy, when you have this condition.
--KLM

 
 
 

Allergy

Post by George Gratta » Sat, 26 Oct 2002 06:52:12


Quote:
> Hi. Started training for my first marathon in May. Slated to run it in
> January. Am really starting to get into it. I'm dreading one thing,
> though. I have all intentions of continuing to run year round, but in
> Feb/Mar, I always come down with the crummiest allergic reaction to
> oak pollen, which is everywhere in my home of Central Florida during
> spring. It's not so much the normal itchy and runny nose and eyes I'm
> worried about; it's more the chest-cold-type symptoms I get when I'm
> breathing hard for extended periods during that time. Any advice? I'd
> hate to have to do the treadmill thing for a month or six weeks.
> Thanks.

Get to your doctor and get started on any number of presriptions by Dec/Jan
if your allergies flare up in Feb/Mar. I've had similar issues without
outdoor exercise, and have finally gotten them under control by a combined
regimen of nasal inhalers (Rhinocort), mouth inhalers (Flovent) and, as
needed, something like Allegra. You can absolutely diminish or avoid these
symptoms altogether, but you've got to start taking the stuff early on to
let it build up and do its work.

There are, of course, some reasons to be concerned about long-term inhaled
steroid use, but you should talk these through with your doctor. Good luck!

--
Shalom, Peace, Salaam

George Grattan

 
 
 

Allergy

Post by George Gratta » Sat, 26 Oct 2002 06:58:54


Quote:

> Get to your doctor and get started on any number of presriptions by Dec/Jan
> if your allergies flare up in Feb/Mar. I've had similar issues without
> outdoor exercise,

Whoops. Read: "I've had similar issues with outdoor exercise,..."

--
Shalom, Peace, Salaam

George Grattan

 
 
 

Allergy

Post by Zac » Tue, 05 Nov 2002 11:50:54

I had similar problems, especially when I lived in the midwest.  It got so
bad that I couldn't run more than a quarter mile before I had the equivalent
of an Asthma attack.  OTC medicine like Clor-Trimeton worked pretty well for
me.  When that didn't do the trick, I stepped up to Claritin.

Recently, I was training for the Ironman, and had similar issues develop.
The doctor presribed Flovent (very expensive, very effective).

I'd be careful about taking prednisone, though.  The stuff effects different
people different ways.  I had a serious battle with Poison oak about 6
months ago, where that was prescribed.  Though I didn't think this was
possible, I averaged 3 hours of sleep a night for three weeks. The stuff had
me amped like I'd never been amped before.  I recall doing 8 mile runs at 3
in the morning, slightly above what is usually my lactate threshold, and not
even being tired afterward.  It is a banned substance for racing, however,
so if you want to feel a drug-free sense of accomplishment, I'd steer clear.

Zac


Quote:
> Hi. Started training for my first marathon in May. Slated to run it in
> January. Am really starting to get into it. I'm dreading one thing,
> though. I have all intentions of continuing to run year round, but in
> Feb/Mar, I always come down with the crummiest allergic reaction to
> oak pollen, which is everywhere in my home of Central Florida during
> spring. It's not so much the normal itchy and runny nose and eyes I'm
> worried about; it's more the chest-cold-type symptoms I get when I'm
> breathing hard for extended periods during that time. Any advice? I'd
> hate to have to do the treadmill thing for a month or six weeks.
> Thanks.