Half-Marathon Training...

Half-Marathon Training...

Post by jsananto.. » Tue, 16 Jan 2007 07:17:42


Yesterday I did my first 10 mile run in preparation for the Miami
Half-Marathon in 2 weeks. This is the longest distance I've ever run,
so I'm not sure what type of soreness is to be expected. Both my ankles
are pretty sore. Sore enough that they cause me to walk with a slight
limp everytime I get up, until something "loosen's up". Then I can walk
normally, but it still hurts a bit. I've had training runs of 6 and 8
miles without this type of soreness so I'm wondering if this is
abnormal, and if I should do anything special to get the ankles ready
for the race in 2 weeks.

Any advice or information would be appreciated.

 
 
 

Half-Marathon Training...

Post by Elflor » Tue, 16 Jan 2007 10:52:02


Quote:
> Yesterday I did my first 10 mile run in preparation for the Miami
> Half-Marathon in 2 weeks. This is the longest distance I've ever run,
> so I'm not sure what type of soreness is to be expected. Both my ankles
> are pretty sore.

What exactly do you mean by "your ankles" ? Where *exactly* is it sore, and
what type of soreness ? It sounds like your describing achilles tendon
problems, but achilles tendons are not ankles.

Cheers,
--
Elflord

 
 
 

Half-Marathon Training...

Post by jobs » Tue, 16 Jan 2007 11:04:13

Quote:

> Yesterday I did my first 10 mile run in preparation for the Miami
> Half-Marathon in 2 weeks. This is the longest distance I've ever run,
> so I'm not sure what type of soreness is to be expected. Both my ankles
> are pretty sore. Sore enough that they cause me to walk with a slight
> limp everytime I get up, until something "loosen's up". Then I can walk
> normally, but it still hurts a bit. I've had training runs of 6 and 8
> miles without this type of soreness so I'm wondering if this is
> abnormal, and if I should do anything special to get the ankles ready
> for the race in 2 weeks.

> Any advice or information would be appreciated.

Without knowing much about your running background, it's hard to tell,
but it seems like you might be a bit under-trained. Given that this was
your longest run ever, the soreness doesn't seem too abnormal. The fact
that you mention that you've not had soreness with 6 and 8 mile run
further points in the direction of under-training.

With two weeks to go for the race, there's not much you can do, short of
being careful not to twist it while living life. However, after the run,
you could try to work on building a good, strong base and see if the
soreness still persists. You can look at the Training Week thread and
participate and you'll get more input.

Good luck with the race,
jobs

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

 
 
 

Half-Marathon Training...

Post by jsananto.. » Tue, 16 Jan 2007 11:05:39

Quote:


> > Yesterday I did my first 10 mile run in preparation for the Miami
> > Half-Marathon in 2 weeks. This is the longest distance I've ever run,
> > so I'm not sure what type of soreness is to be expected. Both my ankles
> > are pretty sore.

> What exactly do you mean by "your ankles" ? Where *exactly* is it sore, and
> what type of soreness ? It sounds like your describing achilles tendon
> problems, but achilles tendons are not ankles.

> Cheers,
> --
> Elflord

No, not my achilles tendons. I mean my ankles. I don't know how to
describe "where" other then to say, my ankles :)

It is sore when my foot hinges from side to side and when I put
pressure on them (i.e. I stand up).

 
 
 

Half-Marathon Training...

Post by jsananto.. » Tue, 16 Jan 2007 11:18:48

Quote:

> Without knowing much about your running background, it's hard to tell,
> but it seems like you might be a bit under-trained. Given that this was
> your longest run ever, the soreness doesn't seem too abnormal. The fact
> that you mention that you've not had soreness with 6 and 8 mile run
> further points in the direction of under-training.

> With two weeks to go for the race, there's not much you can do, short of
> being careful not to twist it while living life. However, after the run,
> you could try to work on building a good, strong base and see if the
> soreness still persists. You can look at the Training Week thread and
> participate and you'll get more input.

> Good luck with the race,
> jobs

I would certainly attribute soreness to undertraining as well (since
I'm obviously not a world class athlete - or even a *** runner by
this groups standards). The only reason I ask is because it's really
ONLY my ankles that are sore. Everything else about me feels remarkably
good. If not for my ankles, I feel as if I could do 10 more today
(which probably isn't a big deal for most here, but a very big deal for
me).

I tried to follow one of those half-marathon training guides which
builds you up to "peak" right before the race. I probably should've
done more research on my own.

Thanks for the input.

 
 
 

Half-Marathon Training...

Post by Dot » Tue, 16 Jan 2007 11:38:27

Quote:



>>>Yesterday I did my first 10 mile run in preparation for the Miami
>>>Half-Marathon in 2 weeks. This is the longest distance I've ever run,
>>>so I'm not sure what type of soreness is to be expected. Both my ankles
>>>are pretty sore.

>>What exactly do you mean by "your ankles" ? Where *exactly* is it sore, and
>>what type of soreness ? It sounds like your describing achilles tendon
>>problems, but achilles tendons are not ankles.

>>Cheers,
>>--
>>Elflord

> No, not my achilles tendons. I mean my ankles. I don't know how to
> describe "where" other then to say, my ankles :)

> It is sore when my foot hinges from side to side and when I put
> pressure on them (i.e. I stand up).

Here's a couple diagrams that might give you some ideas, but the side to
side motion, sounds related to pronation (or sprains, but not both).
http://www.podiatrychannel.com/anatomy/
http://mywebpages.comcast.net/wnor/ankle.htm

The problem walking when getting up sounds related to plantar fasciatus,
which is bottom of the foot, but is frequently associated with achilles
pain, which you said it isn't. (just tossing out ideas to see if any
sound reasonable)

That said, I know that some training pgms (not sure what one you were
using or if using your own) use 10 mi as max length run for half
marathon, but some use a reasonable progression up to it - like 1 mi
increments at a time, but even that is a little fast. Going from 8 to 10
is a 25% increase. The one year I ran on roads, the jump near 9 mi was a
struggle (generally about 10% every other week). That's also about when
I switched to trails (just couldn't handle all the freakin' traffic on
roads for that long). So it's not too surprising to me to hit pain the
1st time at 10 mi, esp. if you don't have much base, like jobs is
suggesting.

But knowing that doesn't help solve your problem. Also, you should
probably be tapering by now so there's not much you can do in training
to really help - other than not injure things farther. When undertrained
and still planning on doing it, it's usually best to show up healthy and
hope for the best - or consider other options like shorter race distance
or later half.

OTOH, this could be a case like DOMS and it goes away in a couple days.
Icing may help (or not).

Sorry, that's probably not much help, but it's hard to tell from your
description and training information what the problem is. But, the
answer to one of your original questions is that, no, you probably
shouldn't have pain like that, but yes, it may not be uncommon if you
don't have the base for it yet.

Dot

--
"If we reach all our goals, we are not setting them high enough."
- Matt Carpenter

 
 
 

Half-Marathon Training...

Post by Dot » Tue, 16 Jan 2007 12:13:10

Quote:

> I tried to follow one of those half-marathon training guides which
> builds you up to "peak" right before the race. I probably should've
> done more research on my own.

If you let us know what you were following and/or what you were doing
and next goals, some here might be able to give you suggestions for
plans or approaches for your next. I know that doesn't help for now, and
hopefully your ankles will feel better in a day or two.

(I didn't mention it in my other post, but while I looked at half plans
for curiousity, I never used one since I thought they'd leave me waaaay
undertrained, but part of that was related to 3500ft hill in 1st 5mi.)

Dot

--
"If we reach all our goals, we are not setting them high enough."
- Matt Carpenter

 
 
 

Half-Marathon Training...

Post by Tony S » Wed, 17 Jan 2007 00:23:14


Quote:
> Yesterday I did my first 10 mile run in preparation for the Miami
> Half-Marathon in 2 weeks. This is the longest distance I've ever run,
> so I'm not sure what type of soreness is to be expected. Both my ankles
> are pretty sore. Sore enough that they cause me to walk with a slight
> limp everytime I get up, until something "loosen's up". Then I can walk
> normally, but it still hurts a bit. I've had training runs of 6 and 8
> miles without this type of soreness so I'm wondering if this is
> abnormal, and if I should do anything special to get the ankles ready
> for the race in 2 weeks.

> Any advice or information would be appreciated.

Icing your ankles and/or feet probably wouldn't hurt. Since you don't know
exactly where the problem is, maybe use an icewater soak up past your
ankles. You can google this newsgroup for advice on icing. I normally do
about 15 mins in any problem areas after particularly hard workouts,
multiple times (e.g. 15 mins icing, 15 mins off, about 3 times in an
evening).

[After long mountain runs or just about any race I do, I like to take an ice
bath: 2-3 bags of ice from the store in the tub filled with cold water to
cover legs, sit in there icing my legs/feet for about 20-25 mins or as long
as I can stand it. It really helps keep muscle swelling down, speeding
recovery, and it will treat stressed joints too.]

-Tony

 
 
 

Half-Marathon Training...

Post by rick+ » Wed, 17 Jan 2007 00:47:29

It sounds like you are not ready for that distance yet.
Its not really that far and you shouldnt be getting sore.
On the other hand I dont worry too much about long
term damage at that distance.   You'll just get very
sore again duting the race.

My guess is you were training on cement and/or using
old shoes where the cushioning was shot.