Two many Fat Girls

Two many Fat Girls

Post by findmeaquotermf » Sun, 01 Feb 2004 07:02:32


Quote:

> 4 burritos. home made.

> estimated cost:
>    tortillas       $0.28
>    beans           $0.25
>    cheese          $0.25
>    jalapenos       $0.10
>    onions          $0.10
>    okra            $0.50
>    satisfaction    $(priceless)

        coworkers finding out through their nostrils $(even priceless-ER!)
Quote:
>    ---------------------
>    total           $1.48 (and no tax)

> jobs

 
 
 

Two many Fat Girls

Post by tizuqi.. » Sun, 01 Feb 2004 07:06:21

Quote:


>>Actually not true even at home.  Try making a nice salad with romaine
>>lettuce, spinach, carrots, and tomatoes.  Then eat fish once a week
>>and maybe pasta and grilled chicken ***s.  It is more expensive to
>>eat healthy than cheap and fatty.

> What of that group is expensive? Chicken ***s are not at the
> expensive end of the meats and there are a lot of fish that are
> relatively cheap. If you aren't buying prepared foods or precut meats
> designed to look pretty int the package and overcharge as a result,
> healthy eating is no more expensive than 'regular' eating.

> And the more expensive 'steak' fish are by and large the least
> healthy. Hate that, because I love tuna steak and wish it would count
> for something...

> Picking through the few healthy fast food items is also no more
> expensive - it just often isn't what you expect without a score card.
> Know some people that buy the fully loaded McDonalds filet sandwiches
> and think they are eating healthy.

> Curtis L. Russell
> Odenton, MD (USA)
> Just someone on two wheels...

i've heard a lot of these animals are raised in days by means of
steroids instead of the normal grace periods of mother nature.  that's
why more people evey second are joining the ranks of ***ism,  oops i
mean veganism.

 
 
 

Two many Fat Girls

Post by Doug Frees » Sun, 01 Feb 2004 07:28:07

Quote:

> It is not only a failure of parents, but even more so of the schools.

You hit one of the nails on the head Kerry!!!! The coke, Pepsi,
chips and shit foods are firmly implanted in the schools and the
schools make money to offset the budget. This takes the finger point
to an even higher level, to our government's lip service to
education and Bubba Bush's "no kid left behind,"  is political
woolgathering.

Schools are the place to break this cycle and we treat schools like
a necessary evil.

Quote:
> The importance of physical education has been consistently played down
> over the years, and such physical education as has been promoted is
> largely organized around competitive sports.  Almost entirely lacking
> has been cultivation of fitness pursuits and healthy lifestyle habits,
> especially diet and exercise.  The dividends of our failure to
> incorporate this instruction in the curriculum of every child is
> plainly evident in our population.

> IMO, physical education ranks with english and math as the most

And so does music, debate etc. Those courses that get sliced so we
can get to Mars or build bigger, better, best bombs. I'm far from
liberal but I think we have a ***ed up sense of priorities. Giving
every one a few bucks back only buys votes and creates a deficit
bigger than Ronnie and daddy Bush. If you're going  to steal from
Social Security at least put it into education. Ok, rant over.....
for a minute or so.

Quote:
> fundamental of subjects and should be required of all students.  But I
> somehow doubt we shall ever see the day when this is implemented by
> our schools.  So for the forseeable future, the best I can say is...
> get used to seeing the fat.  It will be everywhere you look...

We will continue to produce fatter, unhealthier, and dumber kids
and then wonder why other countries kick our technological ass. Of
course arms is always the exception. :(

--
Doug Freese
"Caveat Lector"


 
 
 

Two many Fat Girls

Post by MJuri » Sun, 01 Feb 2004 07:52:15


Quote:
>>It's just that we're becoming a nation of fat people.

>Yeah, and it's kind of a regional thing.  Much worse in the Midwest,

What! You mean the whole country doesn't look like this? I guess I'm
happy... but in some ways sad... very sad...

Maybe it's all the cheese and brats Wisconsin's putting out, Then the
corn from Iowa. Besides it's freakin cold here, maybe we need the
extra layers.

~Matt  

 
 
 

Two many Fat Girls

Post by TopCouns » Sun, 01 Feb 2004 08:01:06

Quote:
>Maybe it's all the cheese and brats Wisconsin's putting out, Then the
>corn from Iowa.

I can tell you what it is, I think.  Out here, there's a bit of the
vegetarianism/health food bug, which infects even meat-eaters like me, so we
mix our diets well.  And there's a bit more of the exercise bug -- you've never
seen so many aerobics studios, martial arts studios, and fitness clubs.  And
the Midwest "steak and potatoes" diet is not our everyday meal -- it might be a
meal for every 2 or 3 weeks.  My folks are Indiana farm-bred people, and yet I
have experimented (in the past) with vegetarianism and fasting.  California
welcomes kooks like me without making us feel like the freaks we probably are!
 
 
 

Two many Fat Girls

Post by Becc » Sun, 01 Feb 2004 08:02:46

Quote:




> >>Salmon's not good for you either unless it's wild.

> > Yeah, I read recently that the farm-raised salmon is fed a lot of ***
> > fish that's loaded with PCBs. Does anyone have more info on this topic?

> http://SportToday.org/

> Google on the following:
> salmon wild farmed nutri

> I've been looking for pages with .edu or .gov endings, rather than .com,
> but many of these look fairly reliable.

> Most of my info is from tv (read: info from seafood marketing) but I can
> probably find the studies to look it up. Alaska salmon is wild and
> generally good for you.

When looking for salmon at places besides the grocery store, the
easiest way to check is to ask:

Is it Atlantic or Pacific?  There is very, very, very little wild
Atlantic salmon left.  Almost all Atlantic salmon is farmed.

Pacific salmon can also be farmed, but it is not nearly as
wide-spread.  Wild salmon is still fished in California and Alaska.

Also, if they say it's fresh and it's out of salmon season...it's
probably farmed.

Finally, most canned salmon is actually Alaskan, so you are probably
okay there.  Just look for that Atlantic word.

NOTE - A LOT OF SMOKED SALMON IS ATLANTIC = FARMED.  Unfortunately,
because smoked is one of my favorites.

If you want more information on what fish are okay to eat and when to
eat them, check the following links:

http://SportToday.org/
http://SportToday.org/

The Monterey Bay Aquarium link even includes an awesome card you can
take with you to dine.

 I believe it's the stuff in the school lunch

- Show quoted text -

Quote:
> menus. I think, but not sure, most canned stuff is likely farmed salmon
> which is what all the fuss is about. However, some of our salmon is
> canned also, so not sure now to distinguish. I'm sure there's something
> on the label, since that would be a big selling point. I'll try to find
> out more. As you might expect, it's a *really big* issue up here to
> generate more markets for our seafood. FWIW, McDonald's fish sandwiches
> have Alaska fish in them (not sure what species, maybe pollock?) - at
> least in Alaska they do.

> Dot
> had to remove some of the ng since my system wouldn't let me post that
> way (2 ng was the max it would take)

 
 
 

Two many Fat Girls

Post by Goran Toma » Sun, 01 Feb 2004 08:12:47

Quote:

>Even still, if you need to eat on the cheap there are other options
>available.  There are plenty of vegetables and fruits that are very
>inexpensive (bananas come to mind).  One doesn't have to eat fresh
>servings of fish and various other organic produce to really be
>healthy.  There are much more frugal options available to folks.

>People who say they can't eat healthy or can't be healthy because it
>costs to much are just looking for another excuse to justify their
>unhealthy lifestyle.

True.

Regards,
Goran Tomas

 
 
 

Two many Fat Girls

Post by MJuri » Sun, 01 Feb 2004 08:40:34

On Fri, 30 Jan 2004 21:43:13 +0000, Achtung!  Spitfire!

Quote:


>>        For the most part I agree, except for the displaying of
>>anatomy that simply isn't all that attractive. If someone chooses to
>>be overweight then more power to them, however making a display of it
>>simply seems a bit over the top. Let's say someone has a huge booger
>>hanging from there nose and find's that somehow attractive, Should we
>>all say "Wow that's to bad they don't want to wipe their nose. Seems
>>perfectly ok though that they sit down next to me in a restuarant and
>>eat. I'm ok with that" I'm sorry I guess I see some things as
>>appropriate and some not. Of course what I find appropriate is 100%
>>based on my opinion and beliefs and in no way means everyone else
>>should feeel the same.  

>Google 'John Stuart Mill'.   Look up his essay 'On Liberty'.   Says it
>all.

        I've only made it thru the Introduction and all I can say is
wow! Absolutely amazing that this was written in 1869.

- Show quoted text -

Quote:

>>        In a sense I agree, yet parents can't be everywhere all of the
>>time. Here's a little story. My kid is a bit overweight, not huge but
>>definately on the plump side. We do what we can at home, good meals
>>take her to the "Y", enroll her in classes, sports etc whatever we can
>>to encourage an active lifestyle.
>>        Moving on. At my childs school we are allowed to buy lunches
>>on a credit card system. Last year same school we did this on a
>>monthly basis allow our child, not 12 years old, to buy lunches and
>>everymonth we'd renew the card. Seemed to work fine with only a couple
>>of times were she "overused" and ended up bring a lunch for the last
>>couple fo days of the month. This year we had the option to buy for
>>the entire year, probably a bad parenting mistake, but we took the
>>option. Just found out a week ago that she had used the entire years
>>supply and now has no money left for lunch. Yes you can say we are bad
>>parents and you'd have strong point by pointing out we didn't check
>>regularly to see how things were going etc. No problem with taking teh
>>blame there. The problem I have is that we were not allowed to specify
>>what the money could be used for. Instead of having teh money used for
>>the standard school lunch the money was used for "junk food" Chips,
>>pop, ice cream bars etc. Yes again bad parenting probably, but when
>>you ask your child what tehy had for lunch and they... bend the
>>truth... ok lie there ass off... One would assume that a decent lunch
>>was eaten. However almost any child given the opportunity of
>>Bag-O-Chips and "standard lunch" goes bag-0-chips. Again yes hind
>>sight is 20-20 and given the choice again I'd be a bit more
>>inquisitive and bit less trusting.
>>        None the less guess who gets to eat bag lunches with, carrots
>>and broccoli and fat free turkey sandwiches for the rest of the year.

>Matt, you kinda proved my point there.   No-one suggested being a
>parent was easy, nor do I have all the answers, but the fundamental
>importance of bringing a child up to have an understanding of the
>relevance of a healthy diet to their future wellbeing is a given as
>far as I'm concerned.

        I definately agree it is a given. I also believe the
responsibility falls squarely on the parents shoulders, in this case
mine. However the degree of difficulty to perform this task is greatly
increased as society deems it necessary to act in counter productive
direction to the parents wishes and actions.
        However as we all know no amount of proding coaxing or bribing
will definately succeed in influencing my child to be a "healthy
eater" as an ***. This choice will have to be made by her as an
*** and to some extent, even now, as the ability I have as a parent
to excercise control over my childs actions diminishes with each
passing day.
        However at 12 I can still brain wash her and send her to
school with no money and a bag lunch.

~Matt

 
 
 

Two many Fat Girls

Post by Lynd » Sun, 01 Feb 2004 09:00:42

Quote:

>>Maybe it's all the cheese and brats Wisconsin's putting out, Then the
>>corn from Iowa.

>I can tell you what it is, I think.  Out here, there's a bit of the
>vegetarianism/health food bug, which infects even meat-eaters like me, so we
>mix our diets well.  And there's a bit more of the exercise bug -- you've
>never
>seen so many aerobics studios, martial arts studios, and fitness clubs.  And
>the Midwest "steak and potatoes" diet is not our everyday meal -- it might be
>a
>meal for every 2 or 3 weeks.  My folks are Indiana farm-bred people, and yet
>I
>have experimented (in the past) with vegetarianism and fasting.  California
>welcomes kooks like me without making us feel like the freaks we probably
>are!

Probably more of a cultural and social thing.  Yes, the people in Wisconsin,
Minnesota and such are, uh, call them "supersized."  But, every year one
magazine (Men's Health?) does a contest about the fattest place in America.
The proverbial winner?   Houston, and usually half of their top ten is from
Texas.  OTOH, one of the fittest places is.....Seattle.

More about Seattle.  My in-laws are in the San Juan Islands northwest of
Seattle.  I've been both places a lot, and I know that there are a lot of fit,
attractive women right in the Seattle area (I'm not too inclined to look at the
men :(  But, if you get into the outlining areas in Washington State far enough
from Seattle that people don't go to Seattle socially, the people let
themselves go, just like those in, say, Wisconsin.  Note, places like Anacortes
and Friday Harbor have health clubs, and even the President of USATF (Bill Roe)
is from this area, but the people there don't have any pressure and they don't
care.

The same cultural issue was the case in Boston (where I went to grad school),
and it's even more true here in South Orange County, CA.  There's a lot of
social pressure on the women here to be in "bikini shape."  So my health club
is about 70% women.  The number of women who are out there 3-5 days a week on
treadmills, stairmaster, and spinning classes?  A whole bunch.  Same thing with
my running club: There was actually a President's Comment entitled, "We've got
too many babes."  But, an equivalent test of male fitness would be doing
multiple sets on the bench at 225-plus: NFL teams test draft choices by how
many reps at 225 they can do.  So how many guys in the gym do I see doing sets
at 225+?  About 4 or 5, including me.  Two of us are over 50 (and we're both
married, he's a power lifter, I'm a sprinter), and one is a personal trainer in
the gym.  Because the men don't seem to have the same social pressure to be in
great shape (to go dating).  Most of the young guys seem to be too weak to lift
a wet noodle.  The OP complaining about fat girls might want to think about
this.

Lyndon
"Speed Kills...It kills those that don't have it!"  --US Olympic Track Coach
Brooks Johnson

 
 
 

Two many Fat Girls

Post by Harold Buc » Sun, 01 Feb 2004 09:10:43

And the award for "Longest thread sparked by a troll and with a glaring
misspelling in the subject line" goes to . . . this thread!

--Harold Buck

"I used to rock and roll all night,
 and party every day.
 Then it was every other day. . . ."
      -Homer J. Simpson

 
 
 

Two many Fat Girls

Post by TopCouns » Sun, 01 Feb 2004 09:24:38

Quote:
>And the award for "Longest thread sparked by a troll and with a glaring
>misspelling in the subject line" goes to . . . this thread!

Well, sure but you know the guys are going to take the bait with a subject line
about "fat girls..."

(Everything's Up to Date in Kansas City....)

 
 
 

Two many Fat Girls

Post by Dall » Sun, 01 Feb 2004 09:49:58

Quote:


>>The problem I have is that we were not allowed to specify
>>what the money could be used for. Instead of having teh money used for
>>the standard school lunch the money was used for "junk food" Chips,
>>pop, ice cream bars etc.

> It bugs the hell out of me that the schools sell junk food like this. A
> lot of them have big deals with soda companies so they can make extra
> money. It bugs the hell out of me that the schools aren't getting enough
> money from the government and they feel the need to do this.

You think THAT bugs you, I can top it.  My local YMCA has a "kid-fit"
room where the kids do baby-sized interval training.  A great place to
send a kid after-school who needs a little bit more activity.  Except
the foyer to the kid-fit room is where all the candy machines are, and
there's a break room area next to that where kids sit around at tables
after-school talking and eating candy bars.

So I walk in there and see maybe one kid slogging away on the equipment
and 12 or 13 kids sitting around at tables with a couple bags of chips
and candy bars lined up in front of them.  The kids who don't have money
for crappy snacks are pitied.

I've complained over and over about this but the Director of the Y says,
"candy and chips can play a part in a healthy balanced diet using
personal choice."  Off the record he also says the vending machines make
too much money they can't get any other way.

I'll tell you, my 9 year old was sneaking money into the Y so he could
get candy.  Because nine years old are like that!  I finally stopped
sending him to the Y because he was getting too pudgy.  (We found other
activities that don't involve candy along with the exercise.)

Dally