beginner's question

beginner's question

Post by D.M.S.Lewi » Mon, 16 Mar 1998 04:00:00


I am just getting started, although I ran years ago, and I have a question
about running everyday vs. skipping days.   Some of what I've read talks
about only running every other day but it doesn't explain what the benefit
of this is or why it would be preferable to running everyday.     Can
anyone give me information on this?

I have generally felt like running everyday and actually look forward to
it, but I don't want to do too much and end up not able to continue.    I
would also like to maximize the conditioning I get from the activity.  

Thank you.
D.M.S. Lewis

 
 
 

beginner's question

Post by ProfWdes » Mon, 16 Mar 1998 04:00:00

A beginning runner may have the energy to
run everyday....but they probably do not
have the ability to handle the shock to
the body everyday....they may feel good
but do damage that the body is not able
to repair in one day...
Also, from a biblical perspective...we are
designed to take a day off per week...
Those who don't follow this usually end
up taking a month off here or there....and
it adds up to about a day per week
anyway....

So, a beginner should run every other
day...so on their off days they can
see if they are getting tight anywhere
...if they continue to run...the flushing
of *** through the area can sometimes
mask the damage being done until it
is too much to loosen up on a run....
Roy M. Wasson....runner

 
 
 

beginner's question

Post by The Turtl » Mon, 16 Mar 1998 04:00:00

As a newer runner myself, I am a new advocate of every other day
running.  My first month I ran every day except one, and noticed that a
lot of my runs were just no fun.  My legs felt like jelly, I could never
get any speed going, and I was dreading the runs (sometimes).  About a
month ago I switched to running MWF & Saturday, Walking TTH and day off
Sunday.  I throw upper body weight stuff in when I remember to.  My
running is so much more fun, now!  I have more energy, I go further and
faster, and I get a really good workout (or at least it feels that
way).  I look forward to my non running days, too, cause the walking is
sort of my way of rewarding myself without going overboard.  Of course,
you'll probably end up hearing from quite a few people about this
subject - the one thing I would recommend is listen to your body.  I
think that anytime you stop enjoying your run, anytime you have pain or
anytime your have no energy, you might need to figure out why.  Good
luck, hope you enjoy getting back in stride!

Heather

 
 
 

beginner's question

Post by the m » Tue, 17 Mar 1998 04:00:00


Quote:
>I am just getting started, although I ran years ago, and I have a question
>about running everyday vs. skipping days.   Some of what I've read talks
>about only running every other day but it doesn't explain what the benefit
>of this is or why it would be preferable to running everyday.     Can
>anyone give me information on this?

>I have generally felt like running everyday and actually look forward to
>it, but I don't want to do too much and end up not able to continue.    I
>would also like to maximize the conditioning I get from the activity.  

looks like you answered your own question. some people are able to run everyday. others
are not. if you are not and you try to anyway, you'll soon get hurt (shin splints,
soreness, strains,  torn ligaments,  etc) and not be able to continue. Bill Bowerman
pushed the idea of doing hard days followed by a day or two of rest (sometimes complete
rest, sometimes real easy short jogs). this doesn't mean you shou;ld take it easy all the
time. just don't follow a hard day with another hard day. if you're getting hurt or too
tired, maybe you want to take it easier.
 
 
 

beginner's question

Post by Mike Tenne » Tue, 17 Mar 1998 04:00:00

Quote:

>I am just getting started, although I ran years ago, and I have a question
>about running everyday vs. skipping days.   Some of what I've read talks
>about only running every other day but it doesn't explain what the benefit
>of this is or why it would be preferable to running everyday.     Can
>anyone give me information on this?

>I have generally felt like running everyday and actually look forward to
>it, but I don't want to do too much and end up not able to continue.    I
>would also like to maximize the conditioning I get from the activity.  

>Thank you.
>D.M.S. Lewis

Hi:

Here's a straight scientific-type answer. <I'm not a scientist, nor do I play on
TV.>

What you are doing when you exercise is stressing the body's systems - muscles,
lungs, heart, etc. When these systems are stressed, they react (during rest) by
re-building themselves STRONGER to cope with the anticipated additional stress.
That's how you get stronger and manage to run further and faster over time.

Rest (recovery) is an essential element. You have to give the body the chance to
rebuild itself. For beginners, this usually involves a day of rest between runs.
As you get stronger, you can cut the rest days down. Many <most?> runners still
keep at least one rest day. <Especially us old farts.>

What happens if you don't give the body time to recover? A downward spiral and
increased risk of injuries.

Each persons need for rest varies, but to improve, you have to give your bod a
chance to recover. For beginners, this almost always means alternate days off.

Mike "TriBop" Tennent
http://www.gate.net/~wbrunner/

 
 
 

beginner's question

Post by Robert Fric » Tue, 17 Mar 1998 04:00:00

As Mike said, the standard method of training is to run hard enough
to break the body down, then allow time for recovery.  Most people will
take actual rest days, but "rest" days for a good runner can and
probably will include days of easy running.

        But, as the Turtle notes, listen to your body.  It sounds like you are
doing fine without rest days.  If you are not running hard, probably you
can get away with no rest days. At least one person, Maffetone, would
argue for training easy rather than hard.  And, the break-yourself-down
method is used by people who want to improve their times, not
necessarily for maintaining health.  Anyway, I would guess that if you
needed a rest day physiologically, you will know it -- you will feel
tired, you would not want to go running, you would be hoping it would
rain so you have an excuse not to run, etc.

Bob

Quote:

> I am just getting started, although I ran years ago, and I have a
> question
> about running everyday vs. skipping days.   Some of what I've read
> talks
> about only running every other day but it doesn't explain what the
> benefit
> of this is or why it would be preferable to running everyday.     Can
> anyone give me information on this?

> I have generally felt like running everyday and actually look forward
> to
> it, but I don't want to do too much and end up not able to continue.
> I
> would also like to maximize the conditioning I get from the activity.

> Thank you.
> D.M.S. Lewis

--
http://www.psy.sunysb.edu/rfrick/
statistical testing, dyslexia, running & glutamine, flow & intuition
 
 
 

beginner's question

Post by Ben Y » Wed, 18 Mar 1998 04:00:00


Quote:


>>I have generally felt like running everyday and actually look forward to
>>it, but I don't want to do too much and end up not able to continue.    I
>>would also like to maximize the conditioning I get from the activity.  

>looks like you answered your own question. some people are able to run everyday. others
>are not. if you are not and you try to anyway, you'll soon get hurt (shin splints,

agreed..it's different for everyone..if you like running everyday
and think it's great, then do it! becuase that's probably a good
sign that your body is able to handle it!

general idea behind skipping days:

running works your muscles pretty well.  For muscles to recover,
you need rest!  similar to weight training, your muscles grow
AFTER you have trained..during the rest/recovery time.  As for
running, your muscles need time to heal and get stronger..
this is especially important for beginning runners.. the muscles
need to heal so that they are able to support the  knees and other
joints used when doing running.  No healing time = muscles get
weaker = more likely to get an injury.    Your body will hopefully
respond to this by making you less motivated to run (hence one
symptom of overtraining is loss of motivation).  Strangely
enough another symptom i believe is loss of sleep and loss of
appetite.

anyway, tha'ts the idea behind it.  If you feel great and happy
and strong when running everyday, then congratulations!  your body
has been brought along by your program to be strong enough to
handle an every day run!

-ben