Marathon training

Marathon training

Post by Lisa Schoute » Wed, 18 Apr 2001 08:01:02


I keep reading about not attempting a marathon unless you have been
running for a few years or so.  Does this mean running for 3 years
without breaks?  I have been running on and off for almost 20 years, but
I have taken long breaks from running over the years.  These breaks have
occurred due to pregnancy, injury, or just plain boredom while I
switched to aerobics.

I plan to run the RNR Marathon after returning to running for 8 months
(at that time).  I took a 9 month break from running for my last
pregnancy and postpartum recovery.  I continued to cross-train including
strength training during that time, but it didn't make running much
easier when I returned to it.  The break came 1 month after my last
marathon when I was sidelined first by ITBS and then the pregnancy.

Just wondering if I'm trying to do too much too quickly with potentially
harmful effects.  I'm shooting for something equal to or less than my
last marathon time of 4:30:00.

Lisa

 
 
 

Marathon training

Post by Ozzie Gonta » Wed, 18 Apr 2001 08:27:31



Quote:
> I keep reading about not attempting a marathon unless you have been
> running for a few years or so.  Does this mean running for 3 years
> without breaks?  I have been running on and off for almost 20 years, but
> I have taken long breaks from running over the years.  These breaks have
> occurred due to pregnancy, injury, or just plain boredom while I
> switched to aerobics.

> I plan to run the RNR Marathon after returning to running for 8 months
> (at that time).  I took a 9 month break from running for my last
> pregnancy and postpartum recovery.  I continued to cross-train including
> strength training during that time, but it didn't make running much
> easier when I returned to it.  The break came 1 month after my last
> marathon when I was sidelined first by ITBS and then the pregnancy.

> Just wondering if I'm trying to do too much too quickly with potentially
> harmful effects.  I'm shooting for something equal to or less than my
> last marathon time of 4:30:00.

> Lisa

If you've continued to cross train and you have that many years of running
experience, even thought off and on, your 8 month build up program will get
you there.

Just keep rolling the quads and ITB.

See you here in San Diego.

--
In health and on the run,
Ozzie Gontang
Maintainer - rec.running FAQ
http://www.faqs.org/faqs/by-newsgroup/rec/rec.running.html
Director, San Diego Marathon Clinic, est. 1975

Mindful Running http://www.mindfulness.com/mr.asp

 
 
 

Marathon training

Post by Joseph Meeha » Wed, 18 Apr 2001 09:21:50

Begin Quote
 I keep reading about not attempting a marathon unless you have been
running for a few years or so.
End Quote

    For most people it is less that a year.  If I at over 50 years can
do it in less than a year, even with injury time out, most people can do
it in a year.

    What many of those people are trying to say is it will take a few
years to get competitive. Personally I don't believe the most important
part of running a marathon is being competitive.  Most of the people who
run are not, they are all one team all runners and all going the same
way.  It is a great group of people and they are all routing for
everyone else.

    Even it you want to finish near the top.  I suggest you don't put
off the big run until you have that kind of speed.  Running a marathon
will help you both physically and physiologically to be more ready for
the next year.

    I will say, don't rush it however.  Try to avoid injury that often
happens when you are trying too hard.

--
Dia 's Muire duit

Joe M

 
 
 

Marathon training

Post by Megan Donahu » Wed, 18 Apr 2001 11:19:43

Hi Lisa -

I used a 10 K goal and then a marathon to get me back into running
after my two pregnancies. Having gone through labor put a completely
different perspective on 3+ hours of running! (Before pregnancy, I never
imagined I could run 15 miles, much less 26.2.) While marathon training
takes up too much time (I'm slow to run those long runs
and slower to recover), I'm
tempted to try it again after sitting out Boston this year. I qualified
at last year's chilly run but decided against investing the winter training

time again. I think I've got the bug without the distance talent,
to the chagrin of my family. :(

What I'm wondering is whether I can train through a Baltimore summer
to run in the inaugural Baltimore marathon next October. Summer to
me seems to be a time for racing on a track not 20 milers...summer is
the time to kick back and imagine my mile-5K performances could
predict marathon times (I kin dream, right?)

- Megan

Quote:

> I keep reading about not attempting a marathon unless you have been
> running for a few years or so.  Does this mean running for 3 years
> without breaks?  I have been running on and off for almost 20 years, but
> I have taken long breaks from running over the years.

> Lisa

 
 
 

Marathon training

Post by oblindenb.. » Sat, 21 Apr 2001 16:38:15

Hi Lisa,

Well I have to agree that a good training will help. And when you train more
regular of course it will be better for your running. Maybe you should take a
look at the following site:

http://www.fit4u.com/us/

This is an interactive training program. The only thing you'll have to do is
fill in some personal details, choose a distance(there are
several(5K,10K,half and whole marathon)) and set a goal. After that your
personal coach comes up with a complete schedule. If you want to skip a
training just fill it in and the computer adjusts the trainingschedule. I
used it because I wanted to run the 10K. Well if you're interested just take
a look at the site. Good luck with your running!

Regards,
Olivier

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