Choosing Track Distances

Choosing Track Distances

Post by Eric Southar » Fri, 14 May 1999 04:00:00


I am a freshman in high school and run track. I didn't run cross country
this past fall, but I'm planning to run it this fall.  I have run a 2:14
800 and a 5:05 mile. I'm not sure which distance I should concentrate
on. Is there a formula or at least some sound advice about which
distance I'll be better at?
I've run for about 2 years, but I've never done much speedwork at all. I
can also run a 400 in about 59.
Any advice would be appreciated.
 
 
 

Choosing Track Distances

Post by Robert Grumbi » Sat, 15 May 1999 04:00:00



Quote:
>I am a freshman in high school and run track. I didn't run cross country
>this past fall, but I'm planning to run it this fall.  I have run a 2:14
>800 and a 5:05 mile. I'm not sure which distance I should concentrate
>on. Is there a formula or at least some sound advice about which
>distance I'll be better at?

  Given the number of people at world class who do well in both the mile
and the half, I don't think you have to chose between them.  (Besides,
this is a conversation to have with your coach.)  Almost all the distance
runners on my high school team ran 800, 1600, and 3200 (though aside from
me, once, not on the same day).

Quote:
>I've run for about 2 years, but I've never done much speedwork at all. I
>can also run a 400 in about 59.

  From your 400 and mile times, I'd guess you have some room to bring
down your 800.  Our 800m guys who were only 1-2 seconds faster than
you at 400 were 7 or so faster at 800.  And the guys near your mile
were also 2:05-2:10.  (For the most part, the same people).  There was
one fellow, though, who was 4:58 at the mile, but 2:18 at the half.
He was a pretty good 2 miler.

  But ... I also see that you're a freshman.  These were upper classmen.
Congratulations on the fine freshman times at both 800 and 1600, and
look forward to even better!

Quote:
>Any advice would be appreciated.

  Listen to the coach, work hard, have fun

--
Robert Grumbine http://www.radix.net/~bobg/ Science faqs and amateur activities notes and links.
Sagredo (Galileo Galilei) "You present these recondite matters with too much
evidence and ease; this great facility makes them less appreciated than they
would be had they been presented in a more abstruse manner." Two New Sciences

 
 
 

Choosing Track Distances

Post by Michael Urquiol » Sat, 15 May 1999 04:00:00

The answer to your question is don't.  You are way too young to be
specializing in a distance and running different distances can complement
each other.  Run them both.  Your times for a freshmen are very good, a
season of cross country will help build up some strength so when you do add
speed work it will stick.

Just as an example.  One of the best high school milers of recent memory J.
Riley from Brookline, MA ran not only the mile but also the 800 and the two
mile.  When it was time for the All-States seinor year he ran the 800
because his coach felt quite correctly that it would help his speed the
following week at the nationals in the mile.

Quote:

> I am a freshman in high school and run track. I didn't run cross country
> this past fall, but I'm planning to run it this fall.  I have run a 2:14
> 800 and a 5:05 mile. I'm not sure which distance I should concentrate
> on. Is there a formula or at least some sound advice about which
> distance I'll be better at?
> I've run for about 2 years, but I've never done much speedwork at all. I
> can also run a 400 in about 59.
> Any advice would be appreciated.


 
 
 

Choosing Track Distances

Post by Mororvi » Sat, 15 May 1999 04:00:00

I'm a high school sophomore and run pretty much the same things that you do.
In normal dual meets though I only run in the 4X800 and the 800.  During
invitationals I sometimes ran a 1600 leg of a relay or something.  PR in 800
is 2:14 and 1600 is 5:12.  I ran that 5:12 time when I was running the 2400
leg of the 8000M relay.  In that relay it goes 1600, 800, 2400, 3200.  FYI
my 2400 time was 7:57.  Because of this time I think I'm going to try and
run 4X800, 1600, and then 3200 next year.  I'll probably be able to mix and
match the 1600 and 3200 if we have a lot of people entered.
Anyway you really should run Cross Country.  It will really help with
endurance.  At the beginning of this track season I thought I wanted to do
the 400 and 800 races.  Well the 800 worked out ok but in the 400 I could
only run a 62.  Well since that 7:57 2400 I've decided I might want to work
on the longer distances.  Anyway pick an event that you LIKE to run and then
pick another one to run so you can see what ones you're really good at.

Quote:
> I am a freshman in high school and run track. I didn't run cross country
> this past fall, but I'm planning to run it this fall.  I have run a 2:14
> 800 and a 5:05 mile. I'm not sure which distance I should concentrate
> on. Is there a formula or at least some sound advice about which
> distance I'll be better at?
> I've run for about 2 years, but I've never done much speedwork at all. I
> can also run a 400 in about 59.
> Any advice would be appreciated.

 
 
 

Choosing Track Distances

Post by LIL » Sun, 16 May 1999 04:00:00

Hi! I'm a freshman girl and I also run track.  It sounds like your times
are pretty good, you could do any of those events, really. Personally I
recommend the mile, it's my favorite, but you should try doing more than
one, a lot of people run more than one event, as long as they're not
back to back or anything. Also, I would definitely recommend x-country,
it will help you a lot in track (and vice versa) and it is a lot of fun.
Well, good luck!
Lillian
Quote:

> I am a freshman in high school and run track. I didn't run cross country
> this past fall, but I'm planning to run it this fall.  I have run a 2:14
> 800 and a 5:05 mile. I'm not sure which distance I should concentrate
> on. Is there a formula or at least some sound advice about which
> distance I'll be better at?
> I've run for about 2 years, but I've never done much speedwork at all. I
> can also run a 400 in about 59.
> Any advice would be appreciated.

 
 
 

Choosing Track Distances

Post by ABLIN3 » Sun, 16 May 1999 04:00:00

Quote:
>Also, I would definitely recommend x-country,
>it will help you a lot in track (and vice versa) and it is a lot of fun.
>Well, good luck!

I'm a sophmore guy.  I ran x-country, and for me its a lot of fun.  Right now
in the mile during outdoor I've only improved 2 seconds at 5:30, and its been
about 4-5 months...any advice on my plateau?  It doesn't seem to end.

Gei-Tai

 
 
 

Choosing Track Distances

Post by LIL » Mon, 17 May 1999 04:00:00

What kind of work-outs do you usually do in practice? Do you usually do
more speedwork or distance? Since I ran x-country too, my coach has been

distance, and that helped me improve a lot. I'm hoping to break 6
tomorrow, it's our last dual meet. IT sounds like you've been doing the
mile for a long time, so it's probably not that you haven't made the
transition from x-country yet...you could try more speed work.
Quote:

> >Also, I would definitely recommend x-country,
> >it will help you a lot in track (and vice versa) and it is a lot of fun.
> >Well, good luck!

> I'm a sophmore guy.  I ran x-country, and for me its a lot of fun.  Right now
> in the mile during outdoor I've only improved 2 seconds at 5:30, and its been
> about 4-5 months...any advice on my plateau?  It doesn't seem to end.

> Gei-Tai

 
 
 

Choosing Track Distances

Post by Conal Guan-Yow » Mon, 17 May 1999 04:00:00

I wouls say ask your coach if you haven't all ready.

: I am a freshman in high school and run track. I didn't run cross country
: this past fall, but I'm planning to run it this fall.  I have run a 2:14
: 800 and a 5:05 mile. I'm not sure which distance I should concentrate
: on. Is there a formula or at least some sound advice about which
: distance I'll be better at?
: I've run for about 2 years, but I've never done much speedwork at all. I
: can also run a 400 in about 59.
: Any advice would be appreciated.
:

--
Conal Ho
Graduate Student
337 Social Sciences I
Department of Anthropology; University of California--Santa Cruz