achilles: stretch then ice or ice then stretch?

achilles: stretch then ice or ice then stretch?

Post by James Pinaki » Sat, 27 Jul 2002 11:22:35


Folks,

I was having a lot of trouble walking in the mornings due to pain behind
my ankle so I checked the rec.running archive and started to suspect
achilles tendinitis. A podiatrist confirmed this diagnosis and said my
orthotics (I pronate very badly) weren't doing the job and that I was
due for new ones (I've had these for nearly 10 years). While these were
being made, I took a month off running and found my morning pain was
considerably reduced. Now I've had the new orthotics for a few weeks and
am running very gently for about 20 minutes, maybe six times a week. I
feel a lot more stable in the new inserts which is a good thing.

Now I'm running (after a fashion) again, I'm taking a lot more care to
stretch after exercise, especially my calves. I'm also icing my tendons
to reduce inflammation, which a lot of people seem to say is the right
thing to do.

My question to the group is which should I do first, ice or stretch? It
seems logical to stretch before icing but I thought I should check.
Also, what position should my feet be in when I ice, extended (i.e. toes
pointed outwards) or in a fairly neutral position. Currently I strap ice
bags onto them while I'm sitting eating my breakfast (after stretching,
after running). The other thing is that after my breakfast, I usually
jump into a warm shower to get ready for work. Is this ok for my ankles
or should I delay warming the tendons for a while.

Thanks for any help. Sorry if this posting has been long-winded.

james

 
 
 

achilles: stretch then ice or ice then stretch?

Post by Bil » Sun, 28 Jul 2002 01:09:11

If you are careful and use a PNF (proprioceptive neuromulscular
facilitation?) technique you can stretch the achilles anytime during
the day.

For wall pushups, before pushing off on the rear foot, raise the rear
heel for a few seconds, under load, by lifting onto the ball of the
foot.  Then slowly relax the calf and lower the heel into the stretch.
 Repeat a few times.

Preceding each stretch with a contraction of the muscles prevents a
natural contraction reflex that resists stretching.

This does wonders for me in all of the stretches:  toes, foot,
achilles, calf, quad, ham, piriformis, ITB, back, psoas, ....

Quote:

> Folks,

> I was having a lot of trouble walking in the mornings due to pain behind
> my ankle so I checked the rec.running archive and started to suspect
> achilles tendinitis. A podiatrist confirmed this diagnosis and said my
> orthotics (I pronate very badly) weren't doing the job and that I was
> due for new ones (I've had these for nearly 10 years). While these were
> being made, I took a month off running and found my morning pain was
> considerably reduced. Now I've had the new orthotics for a few weeks and
> am running very gently for about 20 minutes, maybe six times a week. I
> feel a lot more stable in the new inserts which is a good thing.

> Now I'm running (after a fashion) again, I'm taking a lot more care to
> stretch after exercise, especially my calves. I'm also icing my tendons
> to reduce inflammation, which a lot of people seem to say is the right
> thing to do.

> My question to the group is which should I do first, ice or stretch? It
> seems logical to stretch before icing but I thought I should check.
> Also, what position should my feet be in when I ice, extended (i.e. toes
> pointed outwards) or in a fairly neutral position. Currently I strap ice
> bags onto them while I'm sitting eating my breakfast (after stretching,
> after running). The other thing is that after my breakfast, I usually
> jump into a warm shower to get ready for work. Is this ok for my ankles
> or should I delay warming the tendons for a while.

> Thanks for any help. Sorry if this posting has been long-winded.

> james


 
 
 

achilles: stretch then ice or ice then stretch?

Post by Michael Roos » Sun, 28 Jul 2002 06:01:06


|If you are careful and use a PNF (proprioceptive neuromulscular
|facilitation?) technique you can stretch the achilles anytime during
|the day.

This does take some know how and learning.

 
 
 

achilles: stretch then ice or ice then stretch?

Post by James Pinaki » Tue, 30 Jul 2002 09:49:21

 >
 > If you are careful and use a PNF (proprioceptive neuromulscular
 > facilitation?) technique you can stretch the achilles anytime during
 > the day.

Thanks for the stetching advice - I've been trying it the last few days
(carefully) and it does feel like it's doing me some good.

I'm still wondering about the icing though - when should I apply it,
what position should my foot be in, and is it ok to immediately follow
icing with a warm shower.

Cheers,

james