Running thru' chemotherapy?

Running thru' chemotherapy?

Post by Rosali » Mon, 07 May 2001 16:06:13


Can anyone give me advice on whether it is okay to continue running through
chemotherapy?  I had operation for *** cancer 5 weeks ago and returned to
running after 4 weeks (just my usual 3 times a week, for between 25 to 55
minutes). I start chemotherapy next week, 6 sessions over a period of 18
weeks. As you see above, I'm only a moderate runner -- but I've kept it up
for 25 years (am now aged 54) and I'm very resistant to any suggestion that
I should lay off for a while (I had to after the surgery to allow the wounds
to recover). For me, running is part of feeling "normal" and I am
anticipating that it will help me to cope with the chemotherapy but perhaps
I am being over optimistic. Does anyone have similar experiences to share?

Rosalie
--
Remove CAPS in my email address to reply

 
 
 

Running thru' chemotherapy?

Post by SwStudi » Mon, 07 May 2001 22:01:15

Best of luck in your quest to get back to your regular
lifestyle, which involves running. I can't offer real advice,
only the suggestion that you speak to a oncologist that
has a direct interest in running, or at least one that you
feel comfortable discussing the issues with.

Obviously chemotherapy weakens the body temporarily,
and my guess would be that since running can stress you
as well that you may be prudent to step away from it for
a short time to avoid lengthening recovery process of your
body in general.

Again, I'm not a doc - I am just giving you my opinion. I
wish you a very speedy return to regular activites.

take care,

--
David (in Hamilton, Ont)
"Why should I practice running slow? I already
know how to run slow. I must learn to run fast."
                                                   Emil Zatopek
http://SportToday.org/

-


Quote:
> Can anyone give me advice on whether it is okay to continue running
through
> chemotherapy?  I had operation for *** cancer 5 weeks ago and returned
to
> running after 4 weeks (just my usual 3 times a week, for between 25 to 55
> minutes). I start chemotherapy next week, 6 sessions over a period of 18
> weeks. As you see above, I'm only a moderate runner -- but I've kept it up
> for 25 years (am now aged 54) and I'm very resistant to any suggestion
that
> I should lay off for a while (I had to after the surgery to allow the
wounds
> to recover). For me, running is part of feeling "normal" and I am
> anticipating that it will help me to cope with the chemotherapy but
perhaps
> I am being over optimistic. Does anyone have similar experiences to share?

> Rosalie
> --
> Remove CAPS in my email address to reply


 
 
 

Running thru' chemotherapy?

Post by David Forbe » Tue, 08 May 2001 00:01:24

Maybe our resident MD, Josh Steinberg, can provide some definitive
advice.   All I can say is good luck, and keep doing whatever makes you
feel good.  My wife is a kidney cancer survivor, and though not a
runner, she enjoyed walking during recovery.
Again good luck.

Quote:

> Can anyone give me advice on whether it is okay to continue running through
> chemotherapy?  I had operation for *** cancer 5 weeks ago and returned to
> running after 4 weeks (just my usual 3 times a week, for between 25 to 55
> minutes). I start chemotherapy next week, 6 sessions over a period of 18
> weeks. As you see above, I'm only a moderate runner -- but I've kept it up
> for 25 years (am now aged 54) and I'm very resistant to any suggestion that
> I should lay off for a while (I had to after the surgery to allow the wounds
> to recover). For me, running is part of feeling "normal" and I am
> anticipating that it will help me to cope with the chemotherapy but perhaps
> I am being over optimistic. Does anyone have similar experiences to share?

> Rosalie
> --
> Remove CAPS in my email address to reply

--
Regards,
Dave
**************************************
I'd love to think that there's an end
just waiting right around the bend,
but every turn's a tunnel.
       I descend
I'm the running man...
Edward Ka Spell and kEvin Key,
The Last Man to Fly, 1991
**************************************

 
 
 

Running thru' chemotherapy?

Post by BarryN » Tue, 08 May 2001 06:44:46


Quote:
> Best of luck in your quest to get back to your regular
> lifestyle, which involves running. I can't offer real advice,
> only the suggestion that you speak to a oncologist that
> has a direct interest in running, or at least one that you
> feel comfortable discussing the issues with.

> Obviously chemotherapy weakens the body temporarily,
> and my guess would be that since running can stress you
> as well that you may be prudent to step away from it for
> a short time to avoid lengthening recovery process of your
> body in general.

To second this, running, or any training, does tend to suppress the body's
immune system - in a fully healthy body this should not be a problem but you
do need to check with your doctor really whether it is recommended that you
run during your treatment - if not, something like step aerobics may be an
easier alternative.

Anyway, best of luck...

--
Regards, Barry
Running & Stuff: http://SportToday.org/
"The woods are lovely, dark and deep; but I have training logs to keep; and
miles to run before I sleep".

Quote:
> Again, I'm not a doc - I am just giving you my opinion. I
> wish you a very speedy return to regular activites.

> take care,

> --
> David (in Hamilton, Ont)
> "Why should I practice running slow? I already
> know how to run slow. I must learn to run fast."
>                                                    Emil Zatopek
> http://SportToday.org/

> -



> > Can anyone give me advice on whether it is okay to continue running
> through
> > chemotherapy?  I had operation for *** cancer 5 weeks ago and
returned
> to
> > running after 4 weeks (just my usual 3 times a week, for between 25 to
55
> > minutes). I start chemotherapy next week, 6 sessions over a period of 18
> > weeks. As you see above, I'm only a moderate runner -- but I've kept it
up
> > for 25 years (am now aged 54) and I'm very resistant to any suggestion
> that
> > I should lay off for a while (I had to after the surgery to allow the
> wounds
> > to recover). For me, running is part of feeling "normal" and I am
> > anticipating that it will help me to cope with the chemotherapy but
> perhaps
> > I am being over optimistic. Does anyone have similar experiences to
share?

> > Rosalie
> > --
> > Remove CAPS in my email address to reply

 
 
 

Running thru' chemotherapy?

Post by Josh Steinber » Tue, 08 May 2001 06:50:27

Quote:

> Can anyone give me advice on whether it is okay to continue running through
> chemotherapy?  I had operation for *** cancer 5 weeks ago and returned to
> running after 4 weeks (just my usual 3 times a week, for between 25 to 55
> minutes). I start chemotherapy next week, 6 sessions over a period of 18
> weeks. As you see above, I'm only a moderate runner -- but I've kept it up
> for 25 years (am now aged 54) and I'm very resistant to any suggestion that
> I should lay off for a while (I had to after the surgery to allow the wounds
> to recover). For me, running is part of feeling "normal" and I am
> anticipating that it will help me to cope with the chemotherapy but perhaps
> I am being over optimistic. Does anyone have similar experiences to share?

Dear friend,

    I am so sorry for your misfortune.  Thank you for writing.

    Although I have made the diagnosis of cancer many times and helped many
patients through it, the details of proceeding and enduring chemotherapy is
certainly not in my expertise as a GP.  However, I heartily acknowledge your
need to run, as a matter of mental and spiritual wellness amidst a very tough
time with physical illness.  Please do know that oncologists are very
accustomed to their patients having all sorts of needs, issues, and concerns.
After all, cancer is a disease which challenges people and makes them call on
all their resources to face it and fight it.  You won't be thought the odd-ball
or demanding if you tell your doc that you need to run to get through this.
Cancer docs know patients by the scores who call on religion, family,
spiritualism, friends, poetry, writing, support groups, meditation, and many
other ways to rally one's self and cling to normal, healthy, fulfilling life.
I bet if you make it clear that exercise is a key to your mental and emotional
wellness, your oncologist will do his or her best to minimize any time away
from it.

    I wish you the best of luck on the path you have ahead.

Yours Truly,
-- Josh Steinberg MD, Syracuse

 
 
 

Running thru' chemotherapy?

Post by phoff.. » Wed, 09 May 2001 11:43:42

I would not want anything which I said to cause you to go against
good medical advice. So this is just to share my experience with
you, particularly my experience subsequent to having chemo, in
which my level of performance in, and enjoyment of, endurance sports
is even greater than before.

I'm just a bit older than you, and had an operation, followed by chemo,
exactly four years ago. I do several activities, including running,
and have for many years, but mainly directed towards training for
cross-country ski racing. So I'm not as dedicated a runner as you, but
do go out training almost every day, about 400 hours per year recently.

My chemo was 1 week on followed by 3 weeks off, six times; so it
lasted about half a year. I was only able to do a bit of walking
during the first couple of months of that, but mainly because my
operation had caused some other difficulties which took several
months to overcome.

But for the last 2/3 of that chemo period, I decided to use cycling
to begin getting back in shape. Running wasn't possible then because
of the difficulties referred to above. I found that during the 3rd
and 4th week of each cycle, it was very enjoyable, and I suspect helped
a lot with the chemo treatments, to go out for longer and longer
bike rides. I worked my way up to 100K (60 miles or so) during that
period, as my longest single ride. I owned a HR monitor, and really
took it very easy, keeping down to about 50% to 65% maximum heartrate.

Things have gone very well subsequently. I skiied a lot right after
finishing chemo, but didn't do any real races that season. However,
I got back to it the next season, and seem to do quite a bit better
than I ever did before. I even won my age category in the major
so-called World Loppet race in Canada (Kekinada) last season, though
didn't win it this year. That's a 50K race with pretty big climbs,
about 3.5 hours. So there's no question that in  reasonably short
time, it's quite possible to become just as active as before. I do
plenty of running off-season, along with using the bike and rollerskis.

I can't actually remember whether I really consulted with my doctors
that much about doing this, but if I did, they didn't object. So
with the other respondents to this thread, I'd certainly encourage
you to get advice from your oncologist. As I said above, I found
that resting the chemo week and the week after, then doing very
easy, but longer and longer workouts the other two weeks, worked
really well for me.


 
 
 

Running thru' chemotherapy?

Post by BobMa » Thu, 10 May 2001 11:44:36

Quote:

> Can anyone give me advice on whether it is okay to continue running through
> chemotherapy?  I had operation for *** cancer 5 weeks ago and returned to
> running after 4 weeks (just my usual 3 times a week, for between 25 to 55
> minutes). I start chemotherapy next week, 6 sessions over a period of 18
> weeks. As you see above, I'm only a moderate runner -- but I've kept it up
> for 25 years (am now aged 54) and I'm very resistant to any suggestion that
> I should lay off for a while (I had to after the surgery to allow the wounds
> to recover). For me, running is part of feeling "normal" and I am
> anticipating that it will help me to cope with the chemotherapy but perhaps
> I am being over optimistic. Does anyone have similar experiences to share?

1) Ask the doctor. It's their business to know.
2) The answer may be... "it varies." One of my mates went
through chemo a couple of years back, and barely felt queasy
with it.
3) If you do have to lay off, think of rest as part of your
training. You're doing what you need to do to be in shape
this time next year (and the next year, and the next...)

BobMac