Taper quick and easy in five days?

Taper quick and easy in five days?

Post by lust » Tue, 12 Mar 2002 20:51:39


Suppose someone is stupid enough to train by (almost
exclusively) putting in long (~20K) runs at about
1min above 10K race pace.

He then remembers that he has five (its Monday now,
and the race is on Saturday, so...)days left to the
10K race (that is not particularly important, but he
wants to do as well as he can, considering the above)
he has promised (also to himself) to do.

So what does he do? What should those few days program
look like? What could the miracle session consist of?

Or is it (like I secretly believe it to be) that there
really isnt anything left to do that would actually
return him to his speed?

Anders

 
 
 

Taper quick and easy in five days?

Post by SwStudi » Tue, 12 Mar 2002 22:02:10


Quote:
> Suppose someone is stupid enough to train by (almost
> exclusively) putting in long (~20K) runs at about
> 1min above 10K race pace.

> He then remembers that he has five (its Monday now,
> and the race is on Saturday, so...)days left to the
> 10K race (that is not particularly important, but he
> wants to do as well as he can, considering the above)
> he has promised (also to himself) to do.

> So what does he do? What should those few days program
> look like? What could the miracle session consist of?

> Or is it (like I secretly believe it to be) that there
> really isnt anything left to do that would actually
> return him to his speed?

There's absolutely no training you can do that will
benefit your race. It takes about 10 days to achieve
an effect.

--
David (in Hamilton, Ont)
"Bid me run, and I will strive with things impossible."
                                   Shakespeare, Julius Caesar
http://www.angelfire.com/nc/swstudio/home.html

-

 
 
 

Taper quick and easy in five days?

Post by Jarno Hellstr » Tue, 12 Mar 2002 22:20:52


Quote:

> Suppose someone is stupid enough to train by (almost
> exclusively) putting in long (~20K) runs at about
> 1min above 10K race pace.

> He then remembers that he has five (its Monday now,
> and the race is on Saturday, so...)days left to the
> 10K race (that is not particularly important, but he
> wants to do as well as he can, considering the above)
> he has promised (also to himself) to do.

> So what does he do? What should those few days program
> look like? What could the miracle session consist of?

> Or is it (like I secretly believe it to be) that there
> really isnt anything left to do that would actually
> return him to his speed?

> Anders

Now what would you do if you were him/her?

Jarno :o)

PS. Been busy DABTW&K - still alive - I'll get back here soon. Gotta go. To ski.

--
The woods are lovely, dark and deep
But I have promises to keep
And miles to go before I sleep
And miles to go before I sleep.  - Robert Frost

 
 
 

Taper quick and easy in five days?

Post by Anders Lusti » Tue, 12 Mar 2002 22:28:31


Quote:
> There's absolutely no training you can do that will
> benefit your race. It takes about 10 days to achieve
> an effect.

There are some absolute truths, you know, that do not
always have to be expressed in such outright certain
terms:-)

OTOH what if I - oops! - what if one had those 10 days?

(My 5-day plan consists of: 1) dropping the scheduled 20K
runs, 2) running an easy but fast 10K on Tue,  and an easy
6K on Thu, and 3) telling myself on Fri  that it will hurt a bit
on Sat.)

Anders

--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG

 
 
 

Taper quick and easy in five days?

Post by Steve Freide » Tue, 12 Mar 2002 22:47:10

I'd do some work at or slightly faster than your 10k race pace.

You want to know the feeling of that pace and might try a session or two
of relatively long intervals just to get the feeling into your legs and
mind.  It might not be a miracle but it might prevent you from going out
at the wrong pace during your race.

Monday: off

Tuesday: 1k or 1 mile repeats at or slightly faster than 10k race pace,
with warmup and cooldown, total number of repeats based on your total
weekly mileage - be sure you don't run your race here instead of
Saturday.  Since you haven't done race pace work in a long time, allow
yourself to ease into the workout - let the first rep be too slow, and
gradually try to find the right pace.

Wednesday: off

Thursday: same as Tuesday but half the number of repeats, again with
warmup and cooldown.  Try to really hit the right pace on the head each
time.  Workout should feel brisk but easy, leaving you knowing you could
have run more.  Be sure to get to bed early Thursday night and get a
good night's sleep.

Friday: off, stay off your feet, take it easy.

Saturday: kick ***

-S-

Quote:

> Suppose someone is stupid enough to train by (almost
> exclusively) putting in long (~20K) runs at about
> 1min above 10K race pace.

> He then remembers that he has five (its Monday now,
> and the race is on Saturday, so...)days left to the
> 10K race (that is not particularly important, but he
> wants to do as well as he can, considering the above)
> he has promised (also to himself) to do.

> So what does he do? What should those few days program
> look like? What could the miracle session consist of?

> Or is it (like I secretly believe it to be) that there
> really isnt anything left to do that would actually
> return him to his speed?

> Anders

 
 
 

Taper quick and easy in five days?

Post by Lusti » Wed, 13 Mar 2002 21:44:36


Quote:
> Saturday: kick ***

Dont quite know about that part yet, but Ill
proceed along the lines you suggest.

In fact, I found your advice so intelligent and
sound Im almost certain I had something very
much like it in my mind already:-)

Anders

--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://SportToday.org/

 
 
 

Taper quick and easy in five days?

Post by am » Thu, 14 Mar 2002 05:31:49

Over the years I've been asked to run in races I had no intention of
running. Often in the middle of training for some other race of a
different distance.

You know what, there is only a difference in seconds in performance,
as long as the race is shorter than the one I'm training for. We often
get it into our heads that every race must be raced to the utmost of
our ability and that we must do certain things to be absolutely sure
we get the most out of our performance. This just isn't true.

Over the years I've raced twice on one weekend with the second race
being almost as good as the first. Last year I ran 2 5ks in 2 days and
ran the second one faster by 10 seconds despite everything. I've run 2
10ks in 2 days with excellent performances in both and in one glorious
weekend I set a 10k pr and the next day a half marathon pr. I've run
long runs before races and run pretty well and an assortment of other
combinations. Like not tapering, going stargazing the entire night
before, being careful not tire myself, the list goes on.

Go do your race. I'll bet you end up running no more than a minute off
your usual time. You may even set a pr. It needs to be said, we aren't
olympians with world records depending on every calorie we take in and
expend. We are weekend jocks and there isn't alot we can do that will
dramatically affect our races.

Andy

Quote:

> Suppose someone is stupid enough to train by (almost
> exclusively) putting in long (~20K) runs at about
> 1min above 10K race pace.

> He then remembers that he has five (its Monday now,
> and the race is on Saturday, so...)days left to the
> 10K race (that is not particularly important, but he
> wants to do as well as he can, considering the above)
> he has promised (also to himself) to do.

> So what does he do? What should those few days program
> look like? What could the miracle session consist of?

> Or is it (like I secretly believe it to be) that there
> really isnt anything left to do that would actually
> return him to his speed?

> Anders

 
 
 

Taper quick and easy in five days?

Post by SwStudi » Thu, 14 Mar 2002 08:36:15

Quote:


> > There's absolutely no training you can do that will
> > benefit your race. It takes about 10 days to achieve
> > an effect.

> There are some absolute truths, you know, that do not
> always have to be expressed in such outright certain
> terms:-)

hehe ;-) sorry, I did not mean to sound abrupt. I was probably
in a rush when I typed that.

--
David (in Hamilton, Ont)
"Bid me run, and I will strive with things impossible."
                                   Shakespeare, Julius Caesar
http://www.angelfire.com/nc/swstudio/home.html

-

 
 
 

Taper quick and easy in five days?

Post by Anders Lusti » Thu, 14 Mar 2002 20:19:18


Quote:
> Over the years I've been asked to run in races I had no intention of
> running. Often in the middle of training for some other race of a
> different distance.

Am I right in assuming that your training during the preceeding
months hasnt on these occasions  been quite as bereft of
anything resembling speed work or tempo runs?:-)

Quote:
>(...)
> Go do your race. I'll bet you end up running no more than a minute off
> your usual time. You may even set a pr. It needs to be said, we aren't
> olympians with world records depending on every calorie we take in and
> expend. We are weekend jocks and there isn't alot we can do that will
> dramatically affect our races.

As much as I agree on principle, in sentiment and so on, I beg
to differ. Not all weekend jocks are alike, their training and race
experience can vary a lot - and certainly at the bottom end there
is at least something that can be done to run at ones current
ability.

Physiologically the margin between going out prepared and  
unprepared is undoubtedly quite small - in the short term, in
any longer term we are probably better off than those world
class athletes:-) - but mentally there is much more scope for
doing better or worse, and running - at this level as well, if
not more so - is very much a mental thing.

But backfrom the general  to the specific good old me: I know
I am not going to be within a minute of my PR (from last year),
the goal is to be as far as I can from being 3 minutes slower!

To illustrate: I havent run faster than 4:35/km even in my
dreams sinceI cannot remember when (OTOH that was the
avg pace of a 26km run).  Therefore I went out last night to
do 4 "fast" 1kms (after 3km warm-up and jogging in the
intervals) with a goal of running the last two slightly faster
than 10K race pace.

The result: 4:06, 4:03, 3:57, 3:56 - and I did give it what I
felt was my best! I simply couldnt get my chest to pound
and my lungs to burn, and my limbs werent weak, either,
but my body simply resisted the speed and my mind wasnt
willing to push it beyond that.

You can calculate my projected race time from that, and it
is not impossible that I will not do any better with the benefit
gained by the above experience than if I had had that shock
first in the beginning of the race, but I like to think otherwise:-)

And, last but not least, I think even this preparation will make
all the difference in my (psychological) experience of the race
 - and thats what many weekend jocks race for (as well as
the result measured in time)!

Anders

--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG

 
 
 

Taper quick and easy in five days?

Post by am » Fri, 15 Mar 2002 00:21:31

Quote:



> > Over the years I've been asked to run in races I had no intention of
> > running. Often in the middle of training for some other race of a
> > different distance.

> Am I right in assuming that your training during the preceeding
> months hasnt on these occasions  been quite as bereft of
> anything resembling speed work or tempo runs?:-)

I keep in shape. ;-)

Quote:

> >(...)
> > Go do your race. I'll bet you end up running no more than a minute off
> > your usual time. You may even set a pr. It needs to be said, we aren't
> > olympians with world records depending on every calorie we take in and
> > expend. We are weekend jocks and there isn't alot we can do that will
> > dramatically affect our races.

> As much as I agree on principle, in sentiment and so on, I beg
> to differ. Not all weekend jocks are alike, their training and race
> experience can vary a lot - and certainly at the bottom end there
> is at least something that can be done to run at ones current
> ability.

My meaning of "weekend jock" is a those who have not dedicated their
lives to participating in racing.  Not the weekend jock who seems to
find themselves playing twenty minutes of a game in which there is
more ten times the *** consumption than sweat production. I
consider myself a serious racer and a weekend jock.

Quote:

> Physiologically the margin between going out prepared and  
> unprepared is undoubtedly quite small - in the short term, in
> any longer term we are probably better off than those world
> class athletes:-) - but mentally there is much more scope for
> doing better or worse, and running - at this level as well, if
> not more so - is very much a mental thing.

> But backfrom the general  to the specific good old me: I know
> I am not going to be within a minute of my PR (from last year),
> the goal is to be as far as I can from being 3 minutes slower!

LOL, I often need reminding of the world of difference between
individuals. At least your priorities are straight and you aren't
asking how to spend more time at work!