What to do if you miss marathon training from illness or injury.

What to do if you miss marathon training from illness or injury.

Post by Ozzie Gonta » Sun, 24 May 1998 04:00:00


Scheduled Training is missed; What should I do

People have run marathons after doing the 28 week program and missing a
good portion of the last 4 or 5 weeks.  This was possible because the base
of their training has been strong, consistent, and steady.

Missing Training early in the program

Missing training for a cause for a day or a week or a month is not bad.
Remember the goal is to finish a marathon and still be healthy.  So if you
are willing to walk the majority of the marathon, then a month missed in a
scheduled program won't stop you from finishing.  A specifically targeted
marathon can be done even though you've missed 2 weeks or 4 weeks.  Since
people's training levels vary so greatly, we continually have to go back
to DO NO HARM.  People can test themselves.  Not push themselves but test
where the edge of their training is.

If missed means you haven't been running, but you are doing equivalent
forms of aerobic exercise, stair step, exercycle, then you have lost
little if anything with your marathon schedule.

If you are injured and unable to do anything for 2 to 5 weeks, then you
have lost a good percentage of your aerobic capacity.  This is  why the
training programs are 24 and 28 weeks long for most runners.  It gives
them time to adjust to the increased stress on their bodies so that their
bodies can adapt and adjust to the strain and improve.

I missed 2 days of training  

Great.  You've had two rest days to recover so that you will be able to
run better and easier and maintain good form and style.

I missed one week. No exercise at all  

If you were sick was it from overtraining or was it something you caught
or was it from an injury.

If you were sick, start back slow.  Listen to your body.  You've lost some
conditioning but it will come back.

If it's an injury:  have you been doing the RICE, rest, ice, compression
and elevation.  If it's getting worse, you may want to see a sports
physician, athletic trainer, physical therapist, sports massage therapist
and talk with other marathoners and runners.

I've missed 2 weeks of training

It depends on where the two weeks are.  It also depends on  if the
marathon trainee has a specific marathon for which they are shooting.

First 12 to 16 weeks:  

Missing 2 weeks throws the person back a week.  A person can continue with
the program but the intensity must be lowered.  For many that means
walking more and running less.  For injured runners that means walking
more and gradually increasing the running so that the injury is not
increased.   See injuries

SHOULD I RUN THROUGH IT OR GO HOME AND GO TO BED

Common sense and DO NO HARM.  

   If a minor cold or nasal congestion, often a shorter run at a slower
pace can help through this illness

   With a virus and the accompanying weakness, sore throat, fever and
headache that result, it is best to stop running for several days.

Dr. Jack Scaff's 20 Minute Test

Run for 20 minutes at a slower than normal speed.  If you feel better at
the end of the 20 minutes, you're probably over the worst of being sick
and can continue your training program.  If at the end of the 20 minutes
you're feeling worse, you're still sick and need to get back home and take
care of yourself

If medicated  

The medication prescribed by your doctor has a healing effect but also
many side effects that can harm you if you don't watch it when you go back
to running.   Basically, if you are under medication for viral or
bacterial illness, you shouldn't be running

Cold medicines

Can cause high *** pressure and can increase the chance of the heart
beating irregularly.

Antihistamines

Dry up the nose, but they also can interfere with the sweat reflex and
heat metabolism.  This side effect can lead to heat stroke which can lead
to permanent kidney damage or even death.

Antipyretics   Aspirin which can lower fever have been know to cause
problems with heat metabolism.

Taken from:
MARATHON MENTORING: A TRAINING APPROACH  TO A CHALLENGING MIND/BODY ADVENTURE
? 1994  Austin "Ozzie" Gontang, Ph.D.

Available electronically for $5.

--
In health and on the run,
Ozzie Gontang
Maintainer-rec.running FAQ
Director, San Diego Marathon Clinic,  est. 1975

 
 
 

What to do if you miss marathon training from illness or injury.

Post by Ulrich Eckar » Wed, 27 May 1998 04:00:00



Quote:

>   If a minor cold or nasal congestion, often a shorter run at a slower
>pace can help through this illness

>   With a virus and the accompanying weakness, sore throat, fever and
>headache that result, it is best to stop running for several days.

Hi,
Ozzies tips for runners are great, but here I have to insist:
Running with any kind of infection (even the minor) can be extremely
dangerous. Especially bacteria called "Streptokokken" (what is this in
english?) can cause major heart problems like myocarditis,
inflammation of the heart. Those bacteria are often found when catched
a cold. YOU DON'T KNOW what bacterium caused your cold, so even if it
seems to be a "minor cold", it could be something like
"Streptokokken". If you run with it, your ***stream will transport
those bacteria from your nose, throat or whatever to your heart. Due
to the rough surface structure of the inner heart, those bacteria can
settle down there and go on with their deadly work. If that happens,
you will have to stay a few months  in hospital (in best case) or die
(worst case). However, if you survive it, your life will not be the
same and certainly you will be handicapped for the rest of your life.
Note: This will not necessarily happen, but there is a great danger.
Most people that died while (or short after) running had any kind of
infection before and started training to early (or didn't even stop
it).
The best way to avoid this is, counting your heart rate in bed every
morning at the same time. If you slept normal and it is more than 5-7
bpm higher than normal, there may be an infection in your body, even
if you feel nothing. So don't practice on that day!
Uli

 
 
 

What to do if you miss marathon training from illness or injury.

Post by Miles Laki » Wed, 27 May 1998 04:00:00

Quote:

> Especially bacteria called "Streptokokken" (what is this in
> english?) can cause major heart problems like myocarditis,
> inflammation of the heart. Those bacteria are often found when catched
> a cold.
> If you run with it, your ***stream will transport
> those bacteria from your nose, throat or whatever to your heart.

I don't follow this part. Why would running provoke transport of the
bacteria from nasal passages to the heart???

  Miles

--
 "Each day that I run I have to accept the reality
  of who I am that day" - The Penguin Chronicles

Cut the 0_fin~SPAM_  if you prefer to reply by email

 
 
 

What to do if you miss marathon training from illness or injury.

Post by Ozzie Gonta » Wed, 27 May 1998 04:00:00

Quote:


> >   If a minor cold or nasal congestion, often a shorter run at a slower
> >pace can help through this illness

> >   With a virus and the accompanying weakness, sore throat, fever and
> >headache that result, it is best to stop running for several days.

> Hi,
> Ozzies tips for runners are great, but here I have to insist:
> Running with any kind of infection (even the minor) can be extremely
> dangerous. Especially bacteria called "Streptokokken" (what is this in
> english?) can cause major heart problems like myocarditis,
> inflammation of the heart.

Uli,

Thanks for the input.  Your caveat (beware) is well taken.

--
In health and on the run,
Ozzie Gontang
Maintainer - rec.running FAQ
Director, San Diego Marathon Clinic, est. 1975

 
 
 

What to do if you miss marathon training from illness or injury.

Post by Rod Laws » Fri, 29 May 1998 04:00:00


Quote:


>> Especially bacteria called "Streptokokken" (what is this in
>> english?) can cause major heart problems like myocarditis,
>> inflammation of the heart. Those bacteria are often found when catched
>> a cold.

>> If you run with it, your ***stream will transport
>> those bacteria from your nose, throat or whatever to your heart.

>I don't follow this part. Why would running provoke transport of the
>bacteria from nasal passages to the heart???

Streptokokken is, presumably, Streptococci.
I must admit I've never heard of an association between SBE (the heart
infection
described here) and running, and SBE without pre-existing valve disease
is exceedingly rare.
(Usually those valves aren't rough, so the bugs don't settle there).
 In fact, it's more likely to be caught by a visit to the
dentist. Also, many of us are habouring this bug in our throats all the time
even when we have no symtoms of infection.
I think of more relevance is viral myocarditis, caused by Coxsackie and other
viruses. These often cause trivial infections, but occasionally infect the
heart
muscle itself. Exercise at this time may cause dangerous abnormalities of
rhythm, or damage the muscle itself.
The advice in the end of checking the resting pulse and not exercising if
it is raised more than five or six beats is reasonable; but you should
also be cautious about presuming you're OK if you heart rate's normal or low;
an abnormally low pulse in particular may be associated with a viral infection.
If your pulse is OK, but you feel generally unwell, I would also caution
against
running, and would say it was a definite no-no if your pulse is raised and you
are unwell.
Rod.
The most foolish man may easily ask more than the wisest may ever know.
 
 
 

What to do if you miss marathon training from illness or injury.

Post by Ulrich Eckar » Fri, 29 May 1998 04:00:00

On Tue, 26 May 1998 14:12:32 +0200, Miles Lakin

Quote:

>> If you run with it, your ***stream will transport
>> those bacteria from your nose, throat or whatever to your heart.

>I don't follow this part. Why would running provoke transport of the
>bacteria from nasal passages to the heart???

Miles, my former professor in sports-medicine (who is prof. Hollmann,
former president of the world organization of sport medics) compared
the ***stream with a  calm brook(?)  which becomes a tearing stream
when running (hard to translate that methapor to english...).  
This happens, because your heart pumps more ***/time and the ***
pressure gets high while running. Those bacteria and virii are not
only on the surface of your nasal mucuos membrane or tonsils but also
in the cellular tissue. The *** will tear of the bacteria from the
tissue and transport them to the heart (all *** in the body passes
the heart). Just think of the metaphor above.
In the heart are rough structrures (especially at the valves of the
heart), where the bacteria can nest and breed rapidly - this is the
disaster.
I hope it's clearer now, why running (and other sports) with an
infection can cause real harm to you.
Uli
 
 
 

What to do if you miss marathon training from illness or injury.

Post by Ulrich Eckar » Fri, 29 May 1998 04:00:00


Quote:
>Streptokokken is, presumably, Streptococci.
>I must admit I've never heard of an association between SBE (the heart
>infection
>described here) and running, and SBE without pre-existing valve disease
>is exceedingly rare.
>(Usually those valves aren't rough, so the bugs don't settle there).
> In fact, it's more likely to be caught by a visit to the
>dentist. Also, many of us are habouring this bug in our throats all the time
>even when we have no symtoms of infection.
>I think of more relevance is viral myocarditis, caused by Coxsackie and other
>viruses. These often cause trivial infections, but occasionally infect the
>heart
>muscle itself. Exercise at this time may cause dangerous abnormalities of
>rhythm, or damage the muscle itself.
>The advice in the end of checking the resting pulse and not exercising if
>it is raised more than five or six beats is reasonable; but you should
>also be cautious about presuming you're OK if you heart rate's normal or low;
>an abnormally low pulse in particular may be associated with a viral infection.
>If your pulse is OK, but you feel generally unwell, I would also caution
>against
>running, and would say it was a definite no-no if your pulse is raised and you
>are unwell.

Well, I looked again at my literature (Hollmann/Hettinger,
"Sportmedizin", one of the "bibles" of sportsmedicine in Western
Europe) and found some interesting facts (my translation :-P):

"The most cases of sudden death (nontraumatic) in sports were caused
by organic malfunctions or deseases, which were not known before.
Other cases were caused by a combination of factors like high
temperature, high humidity, full stomach (tension of full stomach
causes a reflex called "vagovasale Synkope", arhythmic beats of the
heart), focus (tonsillitis), infects, cold.
In Western Germany 124 people died from 1966-1975 in sports. 77% of
this cases were caused organic, 23% traumatic. 61% of the organic
cases had any kind of heart desease. 20% of these were angiopathologic
(infarct, angina pectoris,...), 8% had myocarditis, the rest (72%)
died because of infects and other reasons.
All those cases were hobby athletes.
Most dangerous for top athletes in endurance disciplines (like
running, cycling, swimming,...) are acute or chronical infections or
focus/tonsillitis. They often ignore the symptoms and go on with their
training" (a few weeks ago a german soccer professional died for that
reason).
Uli

 
 
 

What to do if you miss marathon training from illness or injury.

Post by Rod Laws » Sat, 30 May 1998 04:00:00


Quote:
Eckartz) writes:
>"The most cases of sudden death (nontraumatic) in sports were caused
>by organic malfunctions or deseases, which were not known before.
>Other cases were caused by a combination of factors like high
>temperature, high humidity, full stomach (tension of full stomach
>causes a reflex called "vagovasale Synkope", arhythmic beats of the
>heart), focus (tonsillitis), infects, cold.
>In Western Germany 124 people died from 1966-1975 in sports. 77% of
>this cases were caused organic, 23% traumatic. 61% of the organic
>cases had any kind of heart desease. 20% of these were angiopathologic
>(infarct, angina pectoris,...), 8% had myocarditis, the rest (72%)
>died because of infects and other reasons.
>All those cases were hobby athletes.
>Most dangerous for top athletes in endurance disciplines (like
>running, cycling, swimming,...) are acute or chronical infections or
>focus/tonsillitis. They often ignore the symptoms and go on with their
>training" (a few weeks ago a german soccer professional died for that
>reason).

This is a bit puzzling. I don't have access to the text you site, but a Medline

search for the last twenty years turned up nothing at all of relevance for
 (athlete or exercise or sport) plus (endocarditis or tonsillitis or
streptococcus).
I even tried searching using pyrexia or fever, and again drew a blank.
(I did however find a fascinating article about injuries, including fatal
injuries
and severe spinal cord trauma, associated with use of golf carts).

I've also searched in the past various combinations of athlete, sport and the
like
with death or lifespan. Most of the literature relates to HOCM (a heart muscle
disorder) and con*** heart disease in younger people, and ischaemic
heart disease in the older athlete. Myocarditis gets a mention, but never
endocarditis. Does your text book give any original source references?

Just to cast in one relevant example to show my search wasn't entirely
fruitless;  
An increase in sudden unexpected cardiac deaths among young
          Swedish orienteers during 1979-1992
Wesslen_L, Pahlson_C, Lindquist_O, Hjelm_E, Gnarpe_J, Larsson_E,
          Baandrup_U, Eriksson_L, Fohlman_J, Engstrand_L, Linglof_T,
          NystromRosander_C, Gnarpe_H, Magnius_L, Rolf_C, Friman_G
European Heart Journal, 1996, Vol.17, No.6, pp.902-910

Background. Six*** cases of sudden unexpected cardiac death,
          15 males and one female, are known to have occurred among young
          Swedish orienteers from 1979 to 1992, of which seven cases
          occurred between 1989 and 1992. This is considered to be
          indicative of an increased death rate. Results.
          Histopathological evaluation showed myocarditis in a higher
          than expected proportion of cases. In one such case, which we
          studied before the sudden unexpected death occurred, the victim
          had suffered a Chlamydia pneumoniae infection verified by
          serology, and a nucleotide sequence was found in the heart and
          lung by means of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that
          hybridized with a probe specific for that organism. Male
          Swedish orienteers do not, however, seem to have an increased
          rate of exposure to this agent. No further sudden unexpected
          deaths among young orienteers have occurred over the past 3.5
          years. At the beginning of that period, attempts were made to
          modify training habits and attitudes.

Rod.
The most foolish man may easily ask more than the wisest may ever know.

 
 
 

What to do if you miss marathon training from illness or injury.

Post by Ulrich Eckar » Tue, 02 Jun 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

>This is a bit puzzling. I don't have access to the text you site, but a Medline

Well, this text is my translation. The original text is written in
german, the booktitle is:"Sportmedizin; Arbeits- und
Trainingsgrundlagen", by W.Hollmann/Th.Hettinger, 3rd Edition,
published by Schattauer Verlagsgesellschaft, Stuttgart/New York 1990
I cited from page 668-673.

Quote:
>search for the last twenty years turned up nothing at all of relevance for
> (athlete or exercise or sport) plus (endocarditis or tonsillitis or
>streptococcus).
>I even tried searching using pyrexia or fever, and again drew a blank.
>(I did however find a fascinating article about injuries, including fatal
>injuries
>and severe spinal cord trauma, associated with use of golf carts).

>I've also searched in the past various combinations of athlete, sport and the
>like
>with death or lifespan. Most of the literature relates to HOCM (a heart muscle
>disorder) and con*** heart disease in younger people, and ischaemic
>heart disease in the older athlete. Myocarditis gets a mention, but never
>endocarditis. Does your text book give any original source references?

Yes, it does. I searched the index of literature (which is nearly 100
_very_ small printed pages) and found the following:

1) Jokl, E., McClellan, J.T (eds.): Exercise and Cardiac Death.
University Park Press, Baltimore, London, Tokio 1971

2) Munscheck, H.: Ursachen des akuten Todes beim Sport in der
Bundesrepublik Deutschland. In: Sportarzt und Sportmedizin 5, p133
(1977)

3) Shephard, R.J.: Exercise prescription and the risk of sudden death.
Canad.Farm.Phys. 8:(1973)

4) Shephard, R.J.: Endurance Fitness. 2nd Ed. University of Toronto
Press, Toronto 1977

Unfortunately those publications are older than 20 years (like so much
medical literature), maybe you didn't find it for that reason. Running
as a mass-phenomen (?) came up in the late seventies, so today there
will probably be more cases of sudden death in sport than in the
sixties or seventies.

Quote:
>Just to cast in one relevant example to show my search wasn't entirely
>fruitless;  
>An increase in sudden unexpected cardiac deaths among young
>          Swedish orienteers during 1979-1992
>Wesslen_L, Pahlson_C, Lindquist_O, Hjelm_E, Gnarpe_J, Larsson_E,
>          Baandrup_U, Eriksson_L, Fohlman_J, Engstrand_L, Linglof_T,
>          NystromRosander_C, Gnarpe_H, Magnius_L, Rolf_C, Friman_G
>European Heart Journal, 1996, Vol.17, No.6, pp.902-910

>Background. Six*** cases of sudden unexpected cardiac death,
>          15 males and one female, are known to have occurred among young
>          Swedish orienteers from 1979 to 1992, of which seven cases
>          occurred between 1989 and 1992. This is considered to be
>          indicative of an increased death rate. Results.
>          Histopathological evaluation showed myocarditis in a higher
>          than expected proportion of cases. In one such case, which we
>          studied before the sudden unexpected death occurred, the victim
>          had suffered a Chlamydia pneumoniae infection verified by
>          serology, and a nucleotide sequence was found in the heart and
>          lung by means of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that
>          hybridized with a probe specific for that organism. Male
>          Swedish orienteers do not, however, seem to have an increased
>          rate of exposure to this agent. No further sudden unexpected
>          deaths among young orienteers have occurred over the past 3.5
>          years. At the beginning of that period, attempts were made to
>          modify training habits and attitudes.

I remember that case. We discussed it in several classes at the
university, but the resumee was (as far as I remember), that there was
no direct clinical connection between those cases and that there were
only many cases of "bad luck" in a short period of time. The swedish
researchers looked for any reasons (insects, allergy, exposure to
bacteria/virii in training camps,...), but nothing was found.

Best regards
Uli

 
 
 

What to do if you miss marathon training from illness or injury.

Post by Rod Laws » Wed, 03 Jun 1998 04:00:00

Ulrich,
Thanks very much for taking the time to look these out. You're right, I didn't
search back past the last 15 years or so.
Unfortunately, they don't look very easy to get hold of, not to mention the
fact
I don't speak German.... Anyway, I'll see what I can find, I'd certainly be
interested.
As you note, these are studies from before the days of mass participation.
I would expect therefore that the big surveys of the problem would be more
recent. In the more recent series I have tracked down,
endocarditis and tonsillitis have not been acknowledged as a problem; by
contrast, myocarditis has; and there is a huge literature on arrhytmias and
myocarditis, of course.
I wonder if this is one of those odd cases where the English and
non-English speaking literature disagrees for no discernable
cause? For example, low *** pressure is, I understand, commonly
acknowledged as a cause of lethargy and malaise in young women
in Continental Europe, but the syndrome is not acknowledged at all
in the majority of UK practice.
Thanks again for the references.


Quote:
Eckartz) writes:
>1) Jokl, E., McClellan, J.T (eds.): Exercise and Cardiac Death.
>University Park Press, Baltimore, London, Tokio 1971

>2) Munscheck, H.: Ursachen des akuten Todes beim Sport in der
>Bundesrepublik Deutschland. In: Sportarzt und Sportmedizin 5, p133
>(1977)

>3) Shephard, R.J.: Exercise prescription and the risk of sudden death.
>Canad.Farm.Phys. 8:(1973)

>4) Shephard, R.J.: Endurance Fitness. 2nd Ed. University of Toronto
>Press, Toronto 1977

>Unfortunately those publications are older than 20 years (like so much
>medical literature), maybe you didn't find it for that reason. Running
>as a mass-phenomen (?) came up in the late seventies, so today there
>will probably be more cases of sudden death in sport than in the
>sixties or seventies.

Rod.
The most foolish man may easily ask more than the wisest may ever know.
 
 
 

What to do if you miss marathon training from illness or injury.

Post by Steve Collie » Thu, 04 Jun 1998 04:00:00

Quote:

> This is a bit puzzling. I don't have access to the text you site, but a Medline

> search for the last twenty years turned up nothing at all of relevance for
>  (athlete or exercise or sport) plus (endocarditis or tonsillitis or
> streptococcus).

Not being picky - maybe you should also include the correct spelling of
the word in the search: 'tonsilitis' i.e. in AltaVista speak

+(athlete | exercise | sport) +(endocarditis | (tonsillitis |
tonsilitis))

This brings up 93 matches but I have no idea whether they are relevant.

SteveC
--
OECD Halden Reactor Project                    ^      fax: +47 6921 2460

1751 Halden,          __/  `._       _-\_<,  /|\`    mob: +47 9284 0669
Norway______.-.____,~  `-.___`.__  ( )/ ( )_ | `____ I pre-fir cycling

 
 
 

What to do if you miss marathon training from illness or injury.

Post by Rod Laws » Thu, 04 Jun 1998 04:00:00


writes:

Quote:

>Not being picky - maybe you should also include the correct spelling of
>the word in the search: 'tonsilitis' i.e. in AltaVista speak

>+(athlete | exercise | sport) +(endocarditis | (tonsillitis |
>tonsilitis))

>This brings up 93 matches but I have no idea whether they are relevant.

Oops!
I'd better get on to that one!
Endocarditis was searched using the thesaurus, so spelling of that wasn't a
problem, and athlete/exercise/sport were OK.
I'd better go and look at the inflamed tonsils again and check....
Rod.
The most foolish man may easily ask more than the wisest may ever know.
 
 
 

What to do if you miss marathon training from illness or injury.

Post by unkno » Fri, 05 Jun 1998 04:00:00



Quote:


>writes:

>>Not being picky - maybe you should also include the correct spelling of
>>the word in the search: 'tonsilitis' i.e. in AltaVista speak

>>+(athlete | exercise | sport) +(endocarditis | (tonsillitis |
>>tonsilitis))

>>This brings up 93 matches but I have no idea whether they are relevant.

>Oops!
>I'd better get on to that one!
>Endocarditis was searched using the thesaurus, so spelling of that wasn't a
>problem, and athlete/exercise/sport were OK.
>I'd better go and look at the inflamed tonsils again and check....
>Rod.
>The most foolish man may easily ask more than the wisest may ever know.

I've checked; tonsillitis (the commoner spelling), tonsilits, it makes no
difference.
I was only able to search 1980 to 1997 due to the University fiddling with
Medline, but there's nothing of relevance linking either of these to
exercise, or athlete, or sport, or death, or endocarditis.
It suddenly occurred to me that the original comment might have referred to
rheumatic fever. The roughness of the valves and bugs in the *** stream
wouldn't really be relevant, as this is immunologically mediated damage, not
dependent on direct access by the bacteria. I did a search using this and
various combinations of the above. Still nothing.
However, on reflection, maybe this is what was being alluded to. Certainly,
in acute rheumatic fever, rest would be conventional advice. However, there
is much more in the literature relating to myocarditis as a risk in practice,
and rheumatic fever is very much a disease of childhood.
 
 
 

What to do if you miss marathon training from illness or injury.

Post by Ozzie Gonta » Sat, 06 Jun 1998 04:00:00

Rod,

Quote:
> I've checked; tonsillitis (the commoner spelling), tonsilits, it makes no
> difference.
> I was only able to search 1980 to 1997 due to the University fiddling with
> Medline, but there's nothing of relevance linking either of these to
> exercise, or athlete, or sport, or death, or endocarditis.
> It suddenly occurred to me that the original comment might have referred to
> rheumatic fever. The roughness of the valves and bugs in the *** stream
> wouldn't really be relevant, as this is immunologically mediated damage, not
> dependent on direct access by the bacteria. I did a search using this and
> various combinations of the above. Still nothing.
> However, on reflection, maybe this is what was being alluded to. Certainly,
> in acute rheumatic fever, rest would be conventional advice. However, there
> is much more in the literature relating to myocarditis as a risk in practice,
> and rheumatic fever is very much a disease of childhood.

Rod,

Just wanted to say thanks for the sluething and clarifying and making
rec.running what it is.  The cross section of wisdom, science and folklore
of running shared here truly weaves an amazing tapestry from which so many
can and do gain insight into their own running experience.

--
In health and on the run,
Ozzie Gontang
Maintainer-rec.running FAQ
Director, San Diego Marathon Clinic,  est. 1975