Running on golf courses

Running on golf courses

Post by Al Gerhei » Wed, 19 Feb 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> I keep reading about how a golf course is one of the better places to
> run, as it is soft, fairly uniform, etc.  However, I can't help but
> wonder how you would accomplish this?  Doesn't it bother the golfers to
> have someone running about while they are trying to drive/pitch/putt?

Besides, seeing someone in good physical condition is always annoying
to golfers.

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Running on golf courses

Post by Bob Harriso » Wed, 19 Feb 1997 04:00:00

I keep reading about how a golf course is one of the better places to
run, as it is soft, fairly uniform, etc.  However, I can't help but
wonder how you would accomplish this?  Doesn't it bother the golfers to
have someone running about while they are trying to drive/pitch/putt?
And don't you have to be constantly on the lookout for golf balls
heading in your direction?  It may be intuitively obvious to even the
casual observer, but I sure can't figure it out...  Maybe it's one of
those ideas that is better in theory than in practice.

Anyone manage to do this successfully?

 
 
 

Running on golf courses

Post by Samuel S Hartwe » Wed, 19 Feb 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

>I keep reading about how a golf course is one of the better places to
>run ...   It may be intuitively obvious to even the
>casual observer, but I sure can't figure it out...  Maybe it's one of
>those ideas that is better in theory than in practice.

>Anyone manage to do this successfully?

The only golf course near me is a private one -- and they wouldn't take
too kindly to me since I wouldn't be in the proper attire ... ;)

Additionally, they've got a pretty active grounds crew (even at 7:00
am) and it is posted no trespassing.

Best bet would be to run it at night.  You won't violate a snooty
club's dress code, and the superintendent can't catch you and escort
you off.  And there aren't any golfers to bother you, either.

Sam.

 
 
 

Running on golf courses

Post by George H. Thi » Thu, 20 Feb 1997 04:00:00

|>
|> Besides, seeing someone in good physical condition is always annoying
|> to golfers.
|>
|>

Reminds me of my first marathon.  My mother-in-law went golfing the same day.  She was
complaining to me that the girl in the "drinks cart" didn't show up until the back nine!

George

 
 
 

Running on golf courses

Post by snowbac » Thu, 20 Feb 1997 04:00:00

Quote:



> >I keep reading about how a golf course is one of the better places to
> >run ...   It may be intuitively obvious to even the
> >casual observer, but I sure can't figure it out...  Maybe it's one of
> >those ideas that is better in theory than in practice.
> >Anyone manage to do this successfully?
> The only golf course near me is a private one -- and they wouldn't take
> too kindly to me since I wouldn't be in the proper attire ... ;)
> Additionally, they've got a pretty active grounds crew (even at 7:00
> am) and it is posted no trespassing.
> Best bet would be to run it at night.  You won't violate a snooty
> club's dress code, and the superintendent can't catch you and escort
> you off.  And there aren't any golfers to bother you, either.

It seems to depend on the golf course -- when I lived in Providence, RI,
we (a team) used to run on 3 or 4 different courses. Some of them would throw
us off the minute they saw us and chase us in their carts etc
(we always used to tell them we were from our rival school....).

A couple of courses used to be real friendly -- ask us how we were doing, tell
us that their golf sucked that day etc.

If it's a special occasion, e.g. a tournament, you may not be welcome even at the
friendliest of courses/

With regard to "proper attire" (I know it was a joke above), they get upset if you run
with your shirt off (maybe they'd make an exception for the ladies....).
They also used to get upset if you ran through the bunkers (sand traps).

Nothing to do with serious running, but a woman I used to go out with lived near a
golf course and she used to sneak in their late at night to run around in the sprinklers.

--snowback.

 
 
 

Running on golf courses

Post by David M Pickerin » Thu, 20 Feb 1997 04:00:00

Excerpts from netnews.rec.running: 18-Feb-97 Running on golf courses by

Quote:
> I keep reading about how a golf course is one of the better places to
> run, as it is soft, fairly uniform, etc.  However, I can't help but
> wonder how you would accomplish this?  Doesn't it bother the golfers to
> have someone running about while they are trying to drive/pitch/putt?
> And don't you have to be constantly on the lookout for golf balls
> heading in your direction?  It may be intuitively obvious to even the
> casual observer, but I sure can't figure it out...  Maybe it's one of
> those ideas that is better in theory than in practice.

> Anyone manage to do this successfully?

You can successfully run on golf courses as long as you show some
consideration for the golfers.  First of all, always run on the
perimeter of the course, never in the fairways--and never ever on the
greens.  When someone is teeing off or putting, try and stay out of
their line of sight or wait until they've made their shot.  Just
remember, above all, to be courteous.

Dave

http://www.psy.cmu.edu/~dp3u/dave.html
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists
elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us."  
--Calvin & Hobbes

 
 
 

Running on golf courses

Post by WTC4 » Thu, 20 Feb 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

>I keep reading about how a golf course is one of the >better places to
>run, as it is soft, fairly uniform, etc.  However, I can't >help but
>wonder how you would accomplish this?  Doesn't it bother >the golfers to
>have someone running about while they are trying to >drive/pitch/putt?
>And don't you have to be constantly on the lookout for golf >balls
>heading in your direction?  It may be intuitively obvious >to even the
>casual observer, but I sure can't figure it out...  Maybe it's >one of
>those ideas that is better in theory than in practice.>

As the owner/manager of a 9-hole public golf course and 40-mile a week
runner, I have never been able to understand this either.  I wouldn't even
run on my own course, which is usually full of golfers from dawn to dark
in good weather.  


 
 
 

Running on golf courses

Post by mlei.. » Thu, 20 Feb 1997 04:00:00

Samuel> The only golf course near me is a private one -- and they wouldn't take
Samuel> too kindly to me since I wouldn't be in the proper attire ... ;)
        <SNIP>
Samuel> Best bet would be to run it at night.  You won't violate a snooty
Samuel> club's dress code, and the superintendent can't catch you and escort
Samuel> you off.  And there aren't any golfers to bother you, either.

Actually, this is why golf courses *are* great for running.  Speaking
from experience (playing midnight golf with friends on private
courses) there is no better interval training than being chased by an
irate groundskeeper in a golf cart.  Intervals are involved as you may
rest in the woods, drainage ditches, etc.  

This was, of course, many many years ago.  There was always the
persistent rumour that the groundskeepers were armed with salt guns
(it definitely helped your motivation).

mark.

 
 
 

Running on golf courses

Post by jimin.. » Thu, 20 Feb 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

> I keep reading about how a golf course is one of the better places to
> run, as it is soft, fairly uniform, etc.  However, I can't help but
> wonder how you would accomplish this?  Doesn't it bother the golfers to
> have someone running about while they are trying to drive/pitch/putt?
> And don't you have to be constantly on the lookout for golf balls
> heading in your direction?  It may be intuitively obvious to even the
> casual observer, but I sure can't figure it out...  Maybe it's one of
> those ideas that is better in theory than in practice.

> Anyone manage to do this successfully?

Here's some tips.   We used to train on golf courses on Monday because
that was a slow day.  It's also the day they cut the grass.   A private
country club golf course may even be closed all day on Monday because
they don't worry about lost revenues.  Also the groundskeepers are
afraid to say anything to you because they think you might be a member.

The best golf course runner I ever saw was triathlete Louis Murphy.  He
had a real nack of planting one foot in front of the tee off markers (ie
women's, men's, pro) and planting his trailing foot right behind the
marker.   Somehow in full stride he would flip the marker right out of
the ground.  This really got golfers irked.  Fortunately for him he was
a 4:18 miler as a 10th grader so he never got caught.

Jim

 
 
 

Running on golf courses

Post by Ozzie Gonta » Thu, 20 Feb 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

> I keep reading about how a golf course is one of the better places to
> run, as it is soft, fairly uniform, etc.  However, I can't help but
> wonder how you would accomplish this?  Doesn't it bother the golfers to
> have someone running about while they are trying to drive/pitch/putt?
> And don't you have to be constantly on the lookout for golf balls
> heading in your direction?  It may be intuitively obvious to even the
> casual observer, but I sure can't figure it out...  Maybe it's one of
> those ideas that is better in theory than in practice.

> Anyone manage to do this successfully?

I have managed to do this under the cover of darkness and the ambient
light of the city.  What I like most about this is that you have to move
slowly and run lightly.  The hills are rolling and with no feedback from
the horizon, you feel like almost running blind.  Great place to work on
form and do repeats on hills

Some people do it in the morning, but I've had run in with keepers and
others...especially dogs ahead of their owners.

--
In health and on the run,
Ozzie Gontang
Maintainer-rec.running FAQ
Director, San Diego Marathon Clinic,  est. 1975

 
 
 

Running on golf courses

Post by Mike Tenne » Fri, 21 Feb 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

>The best golf course runner I ever saw was triathlete Louis Murphy.  He
>had a real nack of planting one foot in front of the tee off markers (ie
>women's, men's, pro) and planting his trailing foot right behind the
>marker.   Somehow in full stride he would flip the marker right out of
>the ground.  This really got golfers irked.  Fortunately for him he was
>a 4:18 miler as a 10th grader so he never got caught.

And I'm sure that really helped the image of runners and made it
easier for others to use the course....

Not a very good way to further the sport.

Mike "TriBop" Tennent
WebRunner Running Page
http://www.webrunner.com/webrun/running/running.html
My Model Railroad Page
http://www.webrunner.com/webrun/srr/

 
 
 

Running on golf courses

Post by rodlaw.. » Wed, 26 Feb 1997 04:00:00


Quote:
>You can successfully run on golf courses as long as you show some
>consideration for the golfers.  First of all, always run on the
>perimeter of the course, never in the fairways--and never ever on the
>greens.  When someone is teeing off or putting, try and stay out of
>their line of sight or wait until they've made their shot.  Just
>remember, above all, to be courteous.

Remember a golf course is primarily intended for people playing golf, so golfers get absolute priority as suggested.
Think about your reaction if a golfer turned up at the local track, took out his 3 iron, and practiced shots from one end to the other whilst you were trying to do some speedwork.

Rod.
Disclaimer; the opinions expressed are not nescessarily yours.

 
 
 

Running on golf courses

Post by Paul Men » Fri, 28 Feb 1997 04:00:00


        ( .. amongst a torrent of other similar tomes ..)

    >But back to the original topic.....
    >Perhaps it should have been stated that golf courses are for golfers,
    >first and foremost. Most are private property. Many don't mind runners
    >early or late - but not when they're "open."

Maybe we have a slightly different perspective in Oz, or maybe there are plenty
of public golf courses .. but ..

My weekday lunch run includes a golf course.  Naturally, if there are golfers
on a particular fairway (or tee), I stay way off the fairway.  Indeed, if
they're on the tee, I usually make my way onto the adjacent fairway if
possible, not just into the trees.  However, if a fairway is free, I make use
of it.  There's nothing like running on a well trimmed fairway.

Never, NEVER run on a green.  That's really stupid.  Nor do you go near a
tee.  It's common sense.  Mind you, I'd suggest golfers' shoes do more green
damage than runners' footwear, but that's not the point.

There are some beautiful public golf courses around here and I've run on them.
I'd suggest if a stampede of runners were a frequent sight, they'd be
discouraged as it would be ruinous.  Greenkeepers tend to forgive the odd
runner or two (I'm an odd one).  In fact they can be quite chatty at times.
As for the golfers, I've built up a rapport with a couple of regular groups, as
I'm now considered a regular too.  They must set their clocks by me, because
they know when I'm late :-)

No, it isn't theory - it's practice.  Great practice.

--
  Paul Menon