If you're fit, Dr's don't have a clue

If you're fit, Dr's don't have a clue

Post by W » Fri, 14 Feb 2003 07:21:11


Yesterday I had a Dept. of Transp. annual physical to keep my Merchant
Marine license up to date, and almost failed.  On my ECG, I had
"Marked Sinus Bradycardia" (aka: slow heart rate:42 bpm), Left Atrial
Enlargement (aka athelete's heart).  The doctor had no clue why my
heart was not "normal".... I also had a pulmonary function test, which
showed narrowing of my lower bronchi (aka exercise induced asthma).
The day before these tests, I did a 21 mile run in 19*F weather, which
I am sure irritated my lungs.
The bottom line is, the baseline for medical tests is drawn on
overweight, sedentary people, and if you are not in that group, the
medical community is baffled.
The doctor suggested a treadmill stress test, and at that point, I
produced a printout of my heart rate curve from the previous days
workout. (Yes, I anticipated a problem with the reading of these
tests.)  She changed her mind on the stress test.
The nurse, doctor, and technician had no clue as to what changes
intense exercise prompts in the human body.
It is very dificult to find people in the medical community
(chiropractors, orthopedics, doctors, endocrinologists, podiatrists,
etc.) who know anything at all about fit ***s. (I am a 51 year old
male.)
M***of the story: De-train before you see a doctor.
Standby for more.....*** and urine tests come back tomorrow.
 
 
 

If you're fit, Dr's don't have a clue

Post by kjsper » Fri, 14 Feb 2003 08:11:23

I ended up in the hospital 4 years back for a week. Thats another story,some
here may remember. Anyway, they took my vitals at night and woke me up every
time because my heart rate was 42 and there MUST be something wrong.

They could never get over that.


Quote:
> Yesterday I had a Dept. of Transp. annual physical to keep my Merchant
> Marine license up to date, and almost failed.  On my ECG, I had
> "Marked Sinus Bradycardia" (aka: slow heart rate:42 bpm), Left Atrial
> Enlargement (aka athelete's heart).  The doctor had no clue why my
> heart was not "normal".... I also had a pulmonary function test, which
> showed narrowing of my lower bronchi (aka exercise induced asthma).
> The day before these tests, I did a 21 mile run in 19*F weather, which
> I am sure irritated my lungs.
> The bottom line is, the baseline for medical tests is drawn on
> overweight, sedentary people, and if you are not in that group, the
> medical community is baffled.
> The doctor suggested a treadmill stress test, and at that point, I
> produced a printout of my heart rate curve from the previous days
> workout. (Yes, I anticipated a problem with the reading of these
> tests.)  She changed her mind on the stress test.
> The nurse, doctor, and technician had no clue as to what changes
> intense exercise prompts in the human body.
> It is very dificult to find people in the medical community
> (chiropractors, orthopedics, doctors, endocrinologists, podiatrists,
> etc.) who know anything at all about fit ***s. (I am a 51 year old
> male.)
> M***of the story: De-train before you see a doctor.
> Standby for more.....*** and urine tests come back tomorrow.


 
 
 

If you're fit, Dr's don't have a clue

Post by Bill Rodger » Fri, 14 Feb 2003 10:48:38

Quote:
>The nurse, doctor, and technician had no clue as to what changes
>intense exercise prompts in the human body.

This unfortuneatly, is typical.

Bill R.

 
 
 

If you're fit, Dr's don't have a clue

Post by David Hamilto » Fri, 14 Feb 2003 13:03:09

Interesting,  when I have  my Merchant Marine physicals (unlimited
Chief Engineer), they usually just check to make sure I can walk and
talk.

OTOH, I am getting my annual fit for diving physical in the morning.
one year ago I weighed 50# more than I do now,  I had high ***
pressure and was boarder line diabetic.  I am now running 40 miles per
week,  my heart rate is down to about 48 bpm,  I've been off the ***
press meds since last summer.

I am eager to see how this physical goes <G>
------------------------------------


Quote:
>Yesterday I had a Dept. of Transp. annual physical to keep my Merchant
>Marine license up to date, and almost failed.  On my ECG, I had
>"Marked Sinus Bradycardia" (aka: slow heart rate:42 bpm), Left Atrial
>Enlargement (aka athelete's heart).  The doctor had no clue why my
>heart was not "normal".... I also had a pulmonary function test, which
>showed narrowing of my lower bronchi (aka exercise induced asthma).
>The day before these tests, I did a 21 mile run in 19*F weather, which
>I am sure irritated my lungs.
>The bottom line is, the baseline for medical tests is drawn on
>overweight, sedentary people, and if you are not in that group, the
>medical community is baffled.
>The doctor suggested a treadmill stress test, and at that point, I
>produced a printout of my heart rate curve from the previous days
>workout. (Yes, I anticipated a problem with the reading of these
>tests.)  She changed her mind on the stress test.
>The nurse, doctor, and technician had no clue as to what changes
>intense exercise prompts in the human body.
>It is very dificult to find people in the medical community
>(chiropractors, orthopedics, doctors, endocrinologists, podiatrists,
>etc.) who know anything at all about fit ***s. (I am a 51 year old
>male.)
>M***of the story: De-train before you see a doctor.
>Standby for more.....*** and urine tests come back tomorrow.

 
 
 

If you're fit, Dr's don't have a clue

Post by Bill Rodger » Fri, 14 Feb 2003 13:43:43

Quote:
>Interesting,  when I have  my Merchant Marine physicals (unlimited
>Chief Engineer), they usually just check to make sure I can walk and
>talk.

Because they figure that chances are good you are going to get your head blown
off anyway, so who cares?

Quote:
>OTOH, I am getting my annual fit for diving physical in the morning.

Wear a mouth dam, muff diving can give you some *** sores.

Quote:
>one year ago I weighed 50# more than I do now,

Cancers eating you up eh?

Quote:
> I had high ***
>pressure and was boarder line diabetic.  I am now running 40 miles per
>week,  my heart rate is down to about 48 bpm,  

A little slower and it's all over buddy.

Quote:
>I've been off the ***
>press meds since last summer.

Good, they go crunch when you step on them.

Quote:
>I am eager to see how this physical goes <G>

Within hours of being pronounced healthy as a horse, you will be out jogging
and be killed instantly when hit by a truck.

Bill R.

 
 
 

If you're fit, Dr's don't have a clue

Post by gentol » Fri, 14 Feb 2003 14:57:58

sound like they will retire you ,,, when they can find out nothing is
wrong
polodzilla
Quote:

> Interesting,  when I have  my Merchant Marine physicals (unlimited
> Chief Engineer), they usually just check to make sure I can walk and
> talk.

> OTOH, I am getting my annual fit for diving physical in the morning.
> one year ago I weighed 50# more than I do now,  I had high ***
> pressure and was boarder line diabetic.  I am now running 40 miles per
> week,  my heart rate is down to about 48 bpm,  I've been off the ***
> press meds since last summer.

> I am eager to see how this physical goes <G>
> ------------------------------------


> >Yesterday I had a Dept. of Transp. annual physical to keep my Merchant
> >Marine license up to date, and almost failed.  On my ECG, I had
> >"Marked Sinus Bradycardia" (aka: slow heart rate:42 bpm), Left Atrial
> >Enlargement (aka athelete's heart).  The doctor had no clue why my
> >heart was not "normal".... I also had a pulmonary function test, which
> >showed narrowing of my lower bronchi (aka exercise induced asthma).
> >The day before these tests, I did a 21 mile run in 19*F weather, which
> >I am sure irritated my lungs.
> >The bottom line is, the baseline for medical tests is drawn on
> >overweight, sedentary people, and if you are not in that group, the
> >medical community is baffled.
> >The doctor suggested a treadmill stress test, and at that point, I
> >produced a printout of my heart rate curve from the previous days
> >workout. (Yes, I anticipated a problem with the reading of these
> >tests.)  She changed her mind on the stress test.
> >The nurse, doctor, and technician had no clue as to what changes
> >intense exercise prompts in the human body.
> >It is very dificult to find people in the medical community
> >(chiropractors, orthopedics, doctors, endocrinologists, podiatrists,
> >etc.) who know anything at all about fit ***s. (I am a 51 year old
> >male.)
> >M***of the story: De-train before you see a doctor.
> >Standby for more.....*** and urine tests come back tomorrow.

 
 
 

If you're fit, Dr's don't have a clue

Post by jthved » Sat, 15 Feb 2003 00:22:56

Not everybody has this problem.  My physician, while nursing a bum
hamstring, coasted through a 10K last summer in 36:48.  I don't get dumb
questions about my heart rate from him.
 
 
 

If you're fit, Dr's don't have a clue

Post by Lynd » Sat, 15 Feb 2003 02:01:20

Quote:
>Yesterday I had a Dept. of Transp. annual physical to keep my Merchant
>Marine license up to date, and almost failed.

<misc. garbage snipped>

Quote:
>The bottom line is, the baseline for medical tests is drawn on
>overweight, sedentary people, and if you are not in that group, the
>medical community is baffled.

It looks to me like you are the one who doesn't have a clue.  The athletic
heart syndrome can be found in medical references--it IS in my Merck Manual.
Mine says that bradycardia >30bpm does not require immediate treatment
(provided that the patient is a rest), but it IS a warning flag (if the patient
is not identified as an endurance athlete).

If you are a runner, you should ALWAYS tell a physician in advance; This should
be in your personal background information.  I compete in middle distances and
coach sprints, and my RHR varies from about 50 down to about 38 (depending on
training status), but I've never had a problem with an a MD mistaking this
because he knows that I'm an athlete.

Also, doing a 20+ mile run the day before a physical that could deny you a
license is not very swift.  It is well established that a marathon can affect
hormonal values for several days, and this can show up in a *** test.
Whether your long run will do the same depends on how hard you run (and your
training/overtraining status), but why would you take the risk?

Lyndon

"Speed Kills...It kills those that don't have it!"  --US Olympic Track Coach
Brooks Johnson

 
 
 

If you're fit, Dr's don't have a clue

Post by Roger Hunte » Sat, 15 Feb 2003 02:05:48


Quote:
> >Yesterday I had a Dept. of Transp. annual physical to keep my Merchant
> >Marine license up to date, and almost failed.

> <misc. garbage snipped>
> It looks to me like you are the one who doesn't have a clue.

<nice explanation snipped>

Thank you, Lyndon.   I was about to say much the same, but in a less
gracious manner.

 
 
 

If you're fit, Dr's don't have a clue

Post by Bill Rodger » Sat, 15 Feb 2003 02:57:06

Quote:
> but I've never had a problem with an a MD mistaking this
>because he knows that I'm an athlete.

Or maybe you're really NOT an athelete, and display none of the symptoms of
athletes heart.

Bill R.

 
 
 

If you're fit, Dr's don't have a clue

Post by TheRack » Sat, 15 Feb 2003 04:49:20

Doctors are like everyone else, there are good ones and bad ones.  I worked in
a hospital and found one hell of a lot of a doctors are pure idiots, they can't
comprehend simple english, have no common sense and no ethics but they want to
be treated like God.  They should make them put their grades on the wall, not
their license, I'll bet you'd find a lot of them graduated medical school with
about a D average.  If I get sick I'd like to get the guy who made A's.  Of
course the same can be said for all the other vocations, lawyers, garbage men,
professional gamblers, ***s, truck drivers and so on so I'm not
discriminating against anyone.  But at least most of the ***s and gamblers
do have some ethics.  You know, honor among thieves or something like that.
Whaddya think Bill????
 
 
 

If you're fit, Dr's don't have a clue

Post by Bill Rodger » Sat, 15 Feb 2003 10:01:51

Quote:
>Doctors are like everyone else, there are good ones and bad ones.  I worked
>in
>a hospital and found one hell of a lot of a doctors are pure idiots, they
>can't
>comprehend simple english, have no common sense and no ethics but they want
>to
>be treated like God.

Yep, and the internet faux versions seem to uphold that theory.

Quote:
>They should make them put their grades on the wall,

We'd die laughing, instead of from malpractice.

Quote:
> If I get sick I'd like to get the guy who made A's.

They're the most arrogant of all.

Quote:
>Of
>course the same can be said for all the other vocations, lawyers, garbage
>men,
>professional gamblers, ***s,

***S?????  <holds breath>

Quote:
> truck drivers and so on so I'm not
>discriminating against anyone.
>Whaddya think Bill????

I think <numbnutz> that ***s are <numbnutz> more ethical <numbnutz> than
most <numbnutz> Dr's.
<lights cigarette>

Bill R.

 
 
 

If you're fit, Dr's don't have a clue

Post by Steve McDona » Sat, 15 Feb 2003 10:27:01

     Where do they offer a college degree in hooking?  Nevada?  At other
schools they have to join a sorority to get this training in an academic
environment.

Steve McDonald

 
 
 

If you're fit, Dr's don't have a clue

Post by Citizen T » Sat, 15 Feb 2003 10:56:38


Quote:
>It is very dificult to find people in the medical community
>(chiropractors, orthopedics, doctors, endocrinologists, podiatrists,
>etc.) who know anything at all about fit ***s.

        I fail to see what chiropractors have to do with the medical
community.

        - TR
        - quack! quack!

 
 
 

If you're fit, Dr's don't have a clue

Post by W » Sat, 15 Feb 2003 11:05:38

Quote:

> >Yesterday I had a Dept. of Transp. annual physical to keep my Merchant
> >Marine license up to date, and almost failed.

> <misc. garbage snipped>

> >The bottom line is, the baseline for medical tests is drawn on
> >overweight, sedentary people, and if you are not in that group, the
> >medical community is baffled.

> It looks to me like you are the one who doesn't have a clue.  The athletic
> heart syndrome can be found in medical references--it IS in my Merck Manual.
> Mine says that bradycardia >30bpm does not require immediate treatment
> (provided that the patient is a rest), but it IS a warning flag (if the patient
> is not identified as an endurance athlete).

> If you are a runner, you should ALWAYS tell a physician in advance; This should
> be in your personal background information.  I compete in middle distances and
> coach sprints, and my RHR varies from about 50 down to about 38 (depending on
> training status), but I've never had a problem with an a MD mistaking this
> because he knows that I'm an athlete.

> Also, doing a 20+ mile run the day before a physical that could deny you a
> license is not very swift.  It is well established that a marathon can affect
> hormonal values for several days, and this can show up in a *** test.
> Whether your long run will do the same depends on how hard you run (and your
> training/overtraining status), but why would you take the risk?

> Lyndon

Lyndon,
 I was forced by DOT guidlines to use a doctor who was referred by an
agency that is used by our company.  You cannot go to your personal
physician for this physical.  I train 11 months a year to run 3
marathons a year, including THAT one in April. The references to
athletes heart that I read suggest a 3 month de-training period to get
the heart back to "normal".  Yes, I did tell these health
professionals that I am a runner, and not your average jogger, but
they still didn't get it.
The point that I was trying to make, Lyndon, is that in order for me
to get "normal" readings on these tests, I would have to do something
that is not normal for me, and that is to become sedentary and
overweight, because that is what most doctors are used to seeeing.
I saw my personal physician today, who knows my history, who reviewed
these tests and said all is OK.
Would you stop running for 3 months to become "normal"?  Not likely.
As far as EIAstma, it is pretty cold here from Nov to March, and any
outdoor acivity would probably cause some lung irritation, from
shovelling snow to cross country skiing.  Winter gets really long if
you don't learn to get outside and enjoy it.
Maybe you can pass your Merck Manual along to the doctor I saw the
other day.  I don't think that she read it.