OT -- Guns don't kill people, dogs do

OT -- Guns don't kill people, dogs do

Post by Grumman-58 » Wed, 09 Jan 2008 11:09:03


http://SportToday.org/

<quote>

Dog steps on loaded shotgun, kills Baytown teacher

By CINDY HORSWELL
Copyright 2008 Houston Chronicle

Chambers County sheriff's investigators have concluded a veteran teacher at Baytown's Robert E. Lee High School, Perry Alvin Price III, was fatally shot by his own dog in a freak hunting accident.

Sheriff Joe LaRive said paw prints from Perry's beloved chocolate Labrador retriever, Arthur, were found on the muddy shotgun that accidentally discharged Saturday evening on a hunting lease near Stowell in Chambers County.

The dog, who was jumping around in the back of Perry's truck, apparently stepped on his loaded shotgun, triggering a discharge that penetrated the tailgate and struck Perry in the thigh.

Perry, 46, died from severe *** loss from his fem***artery shortly after arriving about 6:20 p.m. at Winnie Medical Center.

Perry's hunting companion and a former student, Daniel Groberg, said he unsuccessfully tried to stop the bleeding with clothing before taking him from the hunting lease off FM 1941.

"It's the strangest case that I've seen," LaRive said. "We couldn't talk to Perry and Groberg was at the front of the truck when he heard the shotgun blast and didn't see what happened."

Just before the shooting, Perry had shot a goose but had not seen where it landed.

He put his shotgun in the back of his truck and was about to open the tailgate to release his tracking dog when the shotgun fired, investigators said.

In October, a 37-year-old Tama, Iowa, man also was shot in the leg at close range by his dog, who stepped on his shotgun and tripped the trigger.

James Harris was hit in the calf on the opening day of pheasant season. In
that case, the wound was not life-threatening.

</quote>

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OT -- Guns don't kill people, dogs do

Post by Ed » Wed, 09 Jan 2008 14:11:09

I bet he wins a Darwin award.

No safety?  I guess the dog could of stepped on it first then the
trigger...VERY weird.

I was always taught to never lie a gun down without the breach open....

Quote:

> http://SportToday.org/

> <quote>

> Dog steps on loaded shotgun, kills Baytown teacher

> By CINDY HORSWELL
> Copyright 2008 Houston Chronicle

> Chambers County sheriff's investigators have concluded a veteran teacher at Baytown's Robert E. Lee High School, Perry Alvin Price III, was fatally shot by his own dog in a freak hunting accident.

> Sheriff Joe LaRive said paw prints from Perry's beloved chocolate Labrador retriever, Arthur, were found on the muddy shotgun that accidentally discharged Saturday evening on a hunting lease near Stowell in Chambers County.

> The dog, who was jumping around in the back of Perry's truck, apparently stepped on his loaded shotgun, triggering a discharge that penetrated the tailgate and struck Perry in the thigh.

> Perry, 46, died from severe *** loss from his fem***artery shortly after arriving about 6:20 p.m. at Winnie Medical Center.

> Perry's hunting companion and a former student, Daniel Groberg, said he unsuccessfully tried to stop the bleeding with clothing before taking him from the hunting lease off FM 1941.

> "It's the strangest case that I've seen," LaRive said. "We couldn't talk to Perry and Groberg was at the front of the truck when he heard the shotgun blast and didn't see what happened."

> Just before the shooting, Perry had shot a goose but had not seen where it landed.

> He put his shotgun in the back of his truck and was about to open the tailgate to release his tracking dog when the shotgun fired, investigators said.

> In October, a 37-year-old Tama, Iowa, man also was shot in the leg at close range by his dog, who stepped on his shotgun and tripped the trigger.

> James Harris was hit in the calf on the opening day of pheasant season. In
> that case, the wound was not life-threatening.

> </quote>


 
 
 

OT -- Guns don't kill people, dogs do

Post by Grumman-58 » Wed, 09 Jan 2008 16:58:27

Quote:

> I bet he wins a Darwin award.

Nawh, you have to do something quite a bit more stupid than what he did to
get a Darwin award... Plus, you have to have left no kids behind to carry
on your genes...

Quote:
> No safety?  I guess the dog could of stepped on it first then the
> trigger...VERY weird.

Probably not that weird... Assuming a button safety and he left it
pointing up, it's easy enough to vision the dog stepping on it first...

Quote:
> I was always taught to never lie a gun down without the breach open....

If you are using an open breach type of shotgun, that might be an
option... If you are using a semi-auto or a pump, I'm not sure that having
the ejector all the way back would still be consider as having the breach
open...

Shit happens...

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OT -- Guns don't kill people, dogs do

Post by Lee Bel » Wed, 09 Jan 2008 21:00:26

Ed wrote

Quote:
>I bet he wins a Darwin award.

He might be a nominee.

Quote:
> No safety?

I have a shotgun with no safety. It's a hundred plus year old, break action,
single shot 410 with a hammer. It will never be fired again. That gun can
not be fired without intentionally***ing the hammer and it has a semi safe
half*** postion. I've never even seen a modern shotgun, including break
actions, that did not have a manual safety. It's a virtual certainty that he
failed to engage the safety.

Quote:
> I guess the dog could of stepped on it first then the trigger...VERY
> weird.

Very unlikely too. One of my shotguns has a push button safety near the
trigger. It is small, in a recess and would be very difficult to press by
stepping on it. It's not all that easy to disengage intentionally. The other
three shotguns all have slide safeties mounted on the back of the receiver.
It takes noticable force to disengage them. To disengage one of them
accidentally, the barrel would have to be pressed against something or the
gun would move before the safety would disengage. They would have to be
pushed forward against significant resistance, the opposite direction
required to pull the trigger. I suppose it's possible for the safety to be
disengaged and the trigger pulled by an e***d dog, but the odds against it
are pretty high.

Quote:
> I was always taught to never lie a gun down without the breach open....

Good training, but rarely followed consistently. A lot depends on the
shotgun and what you're doing at the time. Few hunters unload their guns
until they're done hunting for a period. I'm most likely to empty the
chambers on my break action shotguns (over and under) before setting them
down in any environment, whether shooting targets or birds, but am unlikely
to leave them open. In a hunting situation, I'm less likely to unload my
pump shotgun, but more likely to open the action. I was taught not to put
the safety on in most situations to avoid missed shots because I forgot to
take it off again. I retrained myself. I put the the safety on too. The most
likely problem weapon for me is my autoloading 1100. Because it's an
autoloader, I'm less likely to unload it until I'm done shooting and, until
it is unloaded, there's no provision for locking the bolt back. This is a
high capacity tactical shotgun used only for competition. The rules of the
match, club, range and organization all require that weapons be unloaded,
chamber inspected, action closed and hammer dropped by pulling the trigger
while the weapon is pointed down range. The point of pulling the trigger is
a final check to be sure the chamber is empty. At a recent match, when I was
shooting my pump gun, mine wasn't. I'll tell you about that in a minute. The
same process is used for autoloading pistols except when all is said and
one, the action is closed, the hammer dropped and the weapon is holstered
rather than being racked. Only after the gun is confirmed safe, is the
shotgun action opened again, a flag inserted to show it is open, and the gun
placed back in the rack. While my 1100 is a competition only gun, lower
capacity skeet, trap and hunting 1100s are available. My competition shotgun
is never likely to be put down while still loaded, but similar ones used for
hunting might be. If it were me, hunting with an 1100, I'd probably not
unload the weapon until I was sure I was done for a while. Since I can't
lock back the action, it would most likely be set down loaded,***ed and
with a round in the chamber. I would not walk away from the gun in that
condition, but I would set it down that way. I absolutely would put the
safety on. Obviously, that's not the safest solution, but it is the most
likely one. Since I've never hunted with an autoloading shotgun, and have no
plans to do so, this is largely hypothetical, but it's my best guess as to
what would actually happen. I may change my mind after reading this thread.

Even with all of this safety, things sometimes go wrong. About a month ago,
I was shooting my pump shotgun in tacitcal competition. Because it only
holds 5 shells in the tube, it's not really competitive, but my tactical
shotgun was in the shop being modified to make it faster to reload. At the
end of the stage I was shooting, I went through the "make safe" process. I
opened the action, both I and the range officer verified that the chamber
was empty and that there were no more shells in the tube. You can see both
pretty well. I closed the action and pulled the trigger as required by the
rules. The shotgun went off. You may be sure both the RO and I were very
surprised. We had just visually confirmed that the gun was unloaded, or so
we thought. You may be sure that the gun was pointed safely down range as
required by the rules. It took a bit to figure out what happened and we
learned something from doing so. When the action was opened, there was one
round in the tube. On a Mossberg pump, racking the action ejects the spent
casing and drops the next one into the bottom of the action. We checked the
chamber, we checked the tube, both of which were empty, but we did not check
the bottom of the action, where the shotgun shell was waiting to be
chambered when the slide was moved forward. Because I was shooting black
plastic shotgun shells at night, in a dimly lit portion of the range, it was
easy to miss the round in the bottom of the action. When I moved the slide
forward, the round was loaded. When I pulled the trigger, it fired,
confirming for both of us, that even after looking, it's a good idea to
treat a gun like it is loaded and a better idea to check, when it can be
done in a safe direction, by pulling the trigger. An accidental discharge is
an automatic disqualification. I didn't have to be told I was done competing
that night. I got what I deserved. The solution to ensuring against that
happening again, by the way, is to work the action a few more times after
you think all rounds have been ejected just to be extra certain and to know
your shotgun well enough to look everyplace a round might be waiting to
prove Darwin was right. That never would have happened with my competition
gun. It never should have happened with any gun.

Lee

 
 
 

OT -- Guns don't kill people, dogs do

Post by Lee Bel » Wed, 09 Jan 2008 21:14:20

Grumman-581 wrote

Quote:
>> I was always taught to never lie a gun down without the breach open....
> If you are using an open breach type of shotgun, that might be an
> option... If you are using a semi-auto or a pump, I'm not sure that having
> the ejector all the way back would still be consider as having the breach
> open...

It would work if done properly. It's easy with a pump. Open the action and
turn the gun to drop the shell about to load out of the action. It would not
work with my 1100 autoloader. The action won't lock open until the action is
racked without a round in the gun. I thought it might lock open if I worked
the action, held it open and dumped the shell out. It doesn't. That would
leave the chamber empty, but the bolt would be forward.

Even if it would work with my tactical 1100, it would not be a safe way to
do it. It does not take much pressure on the loading gate of a stock 1100 to
drop the bolt and load a round. My 1100 is not stock. It has a speed gate
that extends below the action. It eliminates the button that, in a stock
gun, has to be pushed to load a round into the tube. Because it sticks out
from the action, it's very easy to trip. It's supposed to be. In fact, you
have to be careful when loading a round directly into the chamber, not to
trip it while your fingers are in the action. If you've ever had M-1 thumb,
you know what I mean.

Quote:
> Shit happens...

Not without some help.
 
 
 

OT -- Guns don't kill people, dogs do

Post by Douglas W. » Wed, 09 Jan 2008 22:56:02


Quote:
>I bet he wins a Darwin award.

> No safety?  I guess the dog could of stepped on it first then the
> trigger...VERY weird.

> I was always taught to never lie a gun down without the breach open....

  If the gun was in the truck, it shouldn't have even been loaded.

Quote:

>> http://SportToday.org/

>> <quote>

>> Dog steps on loaded shotgun, kills Baytown teacher

>> By CINDY HORSWELL
>> Copyright 2008 Houston Chronicle

>> Chambers County sheriff's investigators have concluded a veteran teacher
>> at Baytown's Robert E. Lee High School, Perry Alvin Price III, was
>> fatally shot by his own dog in a freak hunting accident.

>> Sheriff Joe LaRive said paw prints from Perry's beloved chocolate
>> Labrador retriever, Arthur, were found on the muddy shotgun that
>> accidentally discharged Saturday evening on a hunting lease near Stowell
>> in Chambers County.

>> The dog, who was jumping around in the back of Perry's truck, apparently
>> stepped on his loaded shotgun, triggering a discharge that penetrated the
>> tailgate and struck Perry in the thigh.

>> Perry, 46, died from severe *** loss from his fem***artery shortly
>> after arriving about 6:20 p.m. at Winnie Medical Center.

>> Perry's hunting companion and a former student, Daniel Groberg, said he
>> unsuccessfully tried to stop the bleeding with clothing before taking him
>> from the hunting lease off FM 1941.

>> "It's the strangest case that I've seen," LaRive said. "We couldn't talk
>> to Perry and Groberg was at the front of the truck when he heard the
>> shotgun blast and didn't see what happened."

>> Just before the shooting, Perry had shot a goose but had not seen where
>> it landed.

>> He put his shotgun in the back of his truck and was about to open the
>> tailgate to release his tracking dog when the shotgun fired,
>> investigators said.

>> In October, a 37-year-old Tama, Iowa, man also was shot in the leg at
>> close range by his dog, who stepped on his shotgun and tripped the
>> trigger.

>> James Harris was hit in the calf on the opening day of pheasant season.
>> In
>> that case, the wound was not life-threatening.

>> </quote>

--

Does anybody here really think that taking away the guns will stop
killing? Or knives, or icepicks, or chains, or ropes, or baseball
bats, or poisons, or cars & trucks. People are gonna kill people,
and they'll always think of a new weapon if you take away the old ones.
And just because I carry a potential weapon doesn't mean I intend to
commit ***, or that I may be tempted to commit ***.
I often carry a big ugly knife. Lots of my friends do too.
I have never heard of anyone being tempted to use the knife on
anyone just because they have it with them. You gotta be in the
mood to do the killing and you use what's at hand. -Jeff Cooper

            Popeye/ www.finalprotectivefire.com
        http://SportToday.org/

 
 
 

OT -- Guns don't kill people, dogs do

Post by Grumman-58 » Thu, 10 Jan 2008 05:52:00

Quote:

> He might be a nominee.

http://SportToday.org/

The lastest update to the article mentions that he has 2 stepchildren, but
it doesn't mention anything about an direct kids, so the requirement of
not havng passed on his genes appears that it might have been met...
Still, considering some of the things that I've seen happen in past years,
it would have to be a really slow year before something like this would be
the top contender...

Quote:
> I have a shotgun with no safety. It's a hundred plus year old, break
> action, single shot 410 with a hammer. It will never be fired again.
> That gun can not be fired without intentionally***ing the hammer and
> it has a semi safe half*** postion. I've never even seen a modern
> shotgun, including break actions, that did not have a manual safety.
> It's a virtual certainty that he failed to engage the safety.

They say that he was extremely safety conscious and think that the dog
must have knocked it off safety...

Interestingly, he had been out goose hunting and he is a teacher at Goose
Creek school district...

Quote:
> Very unlikely too. One of my shotguns has a push button safety near the
> trigger. It is small, in a recess and would be very difficult to press
> by stepping on it. It's not all that easy to disengage intentionally.
> The other three shotguns all have slide safeties mounted on the back of
> the receiver. It takes noticable force to disengage them. To disengage
> one of them accidentally, the barrel would have to be pressed against
> something or the gun would move before the safety would disengage. They
> would have to be pushed forward against significant resistance, the
> opposite direction required to pull the trigger. I suppose it's possible
> for the safety to be disengaged and the trigger pulled by an e***d
> dog, but the odds against it are pretty high.

Well, the shot ended up going through the truck's tailgate, so I suspect
that it was *possible* that the barrel was pressed against it and a slide
safety *might* have been disengaged... I just checked my 3 shotguns and
the H&K .410 has no safety whatsoever since it is a single shot and you
have to*** the hammer for the shot... No half***ed position on the
hammer either... The Remington Model 11 has a slide type safety inside the
trigger guard, in front of the trigger... It has to be pushed forward... A
dog *might* get a paw in there and somehow happen to take the safety off
and then fire it, but it would be a fairly rare occurance... The
Winchester 1300 has button safety and I can see it happening with it quite
a bit more easily than with the other two shotguns... I can also remember
shotguns that I fired when I was a kid whose safeties had less resistance
(perhaps more worn or oiled) and they operated quite a bit easier...

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OT -- Guns don't kill people, dogs do

Post by Lee Bel » Thu, 10 Jan 2008 11:50:48

Douglas W. "Popeye" Frederick wrote

Quote:
>  If the gun was in the truck, it shouldn't have even been loaded.

As I understand it, he shot at game that he could not locate. He laid the
shotgun in the bed of the truck while he got the dog out. The dog was
e***d, as dogs usually are when they're let out in the woods, and managed
to set the shotgun off, hitting the victim in the leg, through the fem***
artery. He bled out pretty quickly.

It would clearly have been better to lay the gun down pointing someplace
other than at himself and put the safety on. While it would have been better
still to unload it, I doubt I would have under the same circumstances. If I
were getting the dog out to find my game, fully expecting to take my loaded
shotgun with me, I probably would not unload it. I would, however, point it
in a safe direction and put the safety on.

Lee

 
 
 

OT -- Guns don't kill people, dogs do

Post by Lee Bel » Thu, 10 Jan 2008 11:53:51

Grumman-581 wrote

Quote:
> They say that he was extremely safety conscious and think that the dog
> must have knocked it off safety...

They always say something like that. Nobody can be sure if the safety was on
or not, but I still think it's very unlikely it was.

If he was so safe, why was his shotgun pointing at him?

Lee

 
 
 

OT -- Guns don't kill people, dogs do

Post by chill » Thu, 10 Jan 2008 13:47:41


Quote:
> Douglas W. "Popeye" Frederick wrote

> >  If the gun was in the truck, it shouldn't have even been loaded.

> As I understand it, he shot at game that he could not locate. He laid the
> shotgun in the bed of the truck while he got the dog out. The dog was
> e***d, as dogs usually are when they're let out in the woods, and
managed
> to set the shotgun off, hitting the victim in the leg, through the fem***
> artery. He bled out pretty quickly.

> It would clearly have been better to lay the gun down pointing someplace
> other than at himself and put the safety on. While it would have been
better
> still to unload it, I doubt I would have under the same circumstances. If
I
> were getting the dog out to find my game, fully expecting to take my
loaded
> shotgun with me, I probably would not unload it. I would, however, point
it
> in a safe direction and put the safety on.

If it had been pointing in the other direction, the dog would have shot his
buddy.
 
 
 

OT -- Guns don't kill people, dogs do

Post by Douglas W. » Thu, 10 Jan 2008 13:52:19


Quote:
> Douglas W. "Popeye" Frederick wrote

>>  If the gun was in the truck, it shouldn't have even been loaded.

> As I understand it, he shot at game that he could not locate. He laid the
> shotgun in the bed of the truck while he got the dog out. The dog was
> e***d, as dogs usually are when they're let out in the woods, and
> managed to set the shotgun off, hitting the victim in the leg, through the
> fem***artery. He bled out pretty quickly.

> It would clearly have been better to lay the gun down pointing someplace
> other than at himself and put the safety on. While it would have been
> better still to unload it, I doubt I would have under the same
> circumstances. If I were getting the dog out to find my game, fully
> expecting to take my loaded shotgun with me, I probably would not unload
> it. I would, however, point it in a safe direction and put the safety on.

> Lee

  The very first gun safety course I took, in high school in 1975, taught
that when not actually prepared to fire at game, the weapon should be
unchambered.

  Crossing fences and streams, walking from the vehicle to the woods,
crossing roads or yards, ect.

--

Does anybody here really think that taking away the guns will stop
killing? Or knives, or icepicks, or chains, or ropes, or baseball
bats, or poisons, or cars & trucks. People are gonna kill people,
and they'll always think of a new weapon if you take away the old ones.
And just because I carry a potential weapon doesn't mean I intend to
commit ***, or that I may be tempted to commit ***.
I often carry a big ugly knife. Lots of my friends do too.
I have never heard of anyone being tempted to use the knife on
anyone just because they have it with them. You gotta be in the
mood to do the killing and you use what's at hand. -Jeff Cooper

            Popeye/ www.finalprotectivefire.com
        http://SportToday.org/

 
 
 

OT -- Guns don't kill people, dogs do

Post by Grumman-58 » Thu, 10 Jan 2008 14:18:12

Quote:

> If it had been pointing in the other direction, the dog would have shot
> his buddy.

I doubt it... From the description that I remember, the buddy was standing
in front of the truck and as such, it would have had to go through the
bed of the pickup, the seat back(s), the dash, the engine, radiator, and
then the grill... Very unlikely...

On the other hand, he could have just asked his buddy to hold his shotgun
for a second while he released the dog... I wouldn't have done it the way
he did it... Not so much because I would have thought that the dog would
shoot me, but rather that I would not want the stock on my shotgun
scratched up while laying in the bed of the pickup...

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OT -- Guns don't kill people, dogs do

Post by chill » Thu, 10 Jan 2008 15:09:13


Quote:

> > If it had been pointing in the other direction, the dog would have shot
> > his buddy.

> I doubt it... From the description that I remember, the buddy was standing
> in front of the truck and as such, it would have had to go through the
> bed of the pickup, the seat back(s), the dash, the engine, radiator, and
> then the grill... Very unlikely...

I thought you were the one with the big sense of humor?

Quote:
> On the other hand, he could have just asked his buddy to hold his shotgun
> for a second while he released the dog... I wouldn't have done it the way
> he did it... Not so much because I would have thought that the dog would
> shoot me, but rather that I would not want the stock on my shotgun
> scratched up while laying in the bed of the pickup...

You worried about it moving all around in there, hunh?
 
 
 

OT -- Guns don't kill people, dogs do

Post by hierophantf.. » Thu, 10 Jan 2008 15:10:01



Quote:
> http://SportToday.org/

> <quote>

> Dog steps on loaded shotgun, kills Baytown teacher

> By CINDY HORSWELL
> Copyright 2008 Houston Chronicle

> Chambers County sheriff's investigators have concluded a veteran teacher at Baytown's Robert E. Lee High School, Perry Alvin Price III, was fatally shot by his own dog in a freak hunting accident.

> Sheriff Joe LaRive said paw prints from Perry's beloved chocolate Labrador retriever, Arthur, were found on the muddy shotgun that accidentally discharged Saturday evening on a hunting lease near Stowell in Chambers County.

> The dog, who was jumping around in the back of Perry's truck, apparently stepped on his loaded shotgun, triggering a discharge that penetrated the tailgate and struck Perry in the thigh.

> Perry, 46, died from severe *** loss from his fem***artery shortly after arriving about 6:20 p.m. at Winnie Medical Center.

> Perry's hunting companion and a former student, Daniel Groberg, said he unsuccessfully tried to stop the bleeding with clothing before taking him from the hunting lease off FM 1941.

> "It's the strangest case that I've seen," LaRive said. "We couldn't talk to Perry and Groberg was at the front of the truck when he heard the shotgun blast and didn't see what happened."

> Just before the shooting, Perry had shot a goose but had not seen where it landed.

> He put his shotgun in the back of his truck and was about to open the tailgate to release his tracking dog when the shotgun fired, investigators said.

> In October, a 37-year-old Tama, Iowa, man also was shot in the leg at close range by his dog, who stepped on his shotgun and tripped the trigger.

> James Harris was hit in the calf on the opening day of pheasant season. In
> that case, the wound was not life-threatening.

> </quote>

> --
> Above email address not valid. ?Look in NNTP headers for real contact info.

This guy is almost as bad as VP Cheny.  His gun should have been
unloaded at best and if not,  then it should have been breached.  Then
again, maybe the guy mistreated his dog for years and his dog decided
that enough was enough.
 
 
 

OT -- Guns don't kill people, dogs do

Post by John Hanso » Thu, 10 Jan 2008 15:42:12

This happens at least once a year.  The shotgun gets laid down on its
left side, dog steps on shotgun and depresses the safety button which
disengages the safety and then puts his toe between the trigger guard
and trigger, firing the shotgun.  This usually always happens in the
field.  This was an exception.


rec.scuba:

Quote:
>I bet he wins a Darwin award.

>No safety?  I guess the dog could of stepped on it first then the
>trigger...VERY weird.

>I was always taught to never lie a gun down without the breach open....


>> http://SportToday.org/

>> <quote>

>> Dog steps on loaded shotgun, kills Baytown teacher

>> By CINDY HORSWELL
>> Copyright 2008 Houston Chronicle

>> Chambers County sheriff's investigators have concluded a veteran teacher at Baytown's Robert E. Lee High School, Perry Alvin Price III, was fatally shot by his own dog in a freak hunting accident.

>> Sheriff Joe LaRive said paw prints from Perry's beloved chocolate Labrador retriever, Arthur, were found on the muddy shotgun that accidentally discharged Saturday evening on a hunting lease near Stowell in Chambers County.

>> The dog, who was jumping around in the back of Perry's truck, apparently stepped on his loaded shotgun, triggering a discharge that penetrated the tailgate and struck Perry in the thigh.

>> Perry, 46, died from severe *** loss from his fem***artery shortly after arriving about 6:20 p.m. at Winnie Medical Center.

>> Perry's hunting companion and a former student, Daniel Groberg, said he unsuccessfully tried to stop the bleeding with clothing before taking him from the hunting lease off FM 1941.

>> "It's the strangest case that I've seen," LaRive said. "We couldn't talk to Perry and Groberg was at the front of the truck when he heard the shotgun blast and didn't see what happened."

>> Just before the shooting, Perry had shot a goose but had not seen where it landed.

>> He put his shotgun in the back of his truck and was about to open the tailgate to release his tracking dog when the shotgun fired, investigators said.

>> In October, a 37-year-old Tama, Iowa, man also was shot in the leg at close range by his dog, who stepped on his shotgun and tripped the trigger.

>> James Harris was hit in the calf on the opening day of pheasant season. In
>> that case, the wound was not life-threatening.

>> </quote>