'Save A Dive' vs 'Spare Parts Kit'

'Save A Dive' vs 'Spare Parts Kit'

Post by Randy F. Mila » Fri, 06 Dec 2002 03:31:01


        Before a diver can assemble a "save a dive kit" or a "spare parts kit", one first
needs to assess the spare parts and accessory needs of their equipment.  For most
divers, there is no need to carry superfluous items that do not apply to their
gear. Exceptions may be divemasters and instructors whom sometimes need to
compensate for their students lack of planning etc..  The suggestion is to not
rely on these individuals but rather to gain the mindset that is required to plan
ahead for oneself.  The diver will gain a sense of accomplishment and maybe even
impress their fellow divers when they solve equipment problems on their own.

        One can easily draw a distinction between a "save a dive kit" and a "spare parts
kit".  Physical size is the first obvious distinction.  Save a dive kits usually
consist of commonly used repair items (mask/fins straps et al.) which make for
last minute unexpected repairs just prior to a dive.  Conversely, spare parts kits
may contain all the items of the save a dive kit (at the divers discretion) in
addition to consumables and accessory items necessary for gear maintenance and
reconfiguration prior to departure to the dive site (e.g., DIN fill adapters,
lubricants, cable ties,***tubing, mouthpieces etc.)

        While two different kits may appear to bring about more confusion, they actually
have the potential to streamline the amount of gear one carries aboard when used
correctly.  A common practice is to take the smaller save a dive kit on board and
leave the spare parts kit in the vehicle.  Space on board any vessel is at a
premium.  Tackle boxes and tote bins full of spare parts/superfluous gear, takes
up valuable space and should be totally unnecessary.  Gear maintenance and
configuration should already be completed prior to departure and therefore only
the 'save a dive kit' inventory appears necessary on board.

        There is no substitute for proper regular maintenance by a trained technician.
Regardless of skill level, all divers should inspect all of their gear prior to
departure.  Even annoyances such as broken fin or mask straps don't usually happen
without warning.  Worn, cracked, hard or torn *** or silicone straps should be
discovered well in advance of dive departure and replaced well ahead of failure.
Therefore, with proper inspection and maintenance, the diver should theoretically
not require any spare parts/superfluous gear on board the dive vessel.

        As durable and reliable as our equipment is, and regardless of how vigilant the
gear inspections made, our dive equipment is not impervious to failure at a most
inconvenient place and time.  Hence the need for 'save a dive' and 'spare parts
kits'. However, be courteous to your fellow diver and leave the tackle boxes and
tote bins full of superfluous items off the dive vessel.  Inspect and replace as
necessary well ahead of time.  The following is a compilation of suggested items
for both save a dive kits and spare parts kits, though hardly exhaustive:

Save A Dive Kit

- Mask strap (make sure it fits your mask!)
- Fin strap (with buckle assemblies to make for fast replacement)
- Snorkel keeper (old style works best and can double as an octopus holder)
- Regulator mouthpiece and cable tie
- Tank O-rings (usually size 2-014)
- TIP: An excellent save a dive kit is probably available from your local dive
center.

Spare Parts Kit

Consumables
- Cable ties, various sizes
-***tubing (retain long secondary hose, lift bags, consoles, slate pencils,
etc.)
- Bicycle tire tube ("10-speed" size works best to retain unruly hoses)
- Elastic (AKA Bungee) cord
- Short nylon braided line
- O-rings (check with your local dive center for proper sizes and materials)
- Lubricants (silicone grease, DOW 111, DOW 777, Christo-Lube, Krytox, etc.)
- Dry suit zipper wax and cleaner (wax the suit zipper before you board)
- Wet suit cleaner (Mirazyme seems to work well)
- Tape (duct, electrical, hockey, etc.)
- Pencil, eraser, pen and marker
- Bulbs for your dive lights
- Fuses (for most canister lights)
- Mask defog gel or drops
- Abrasive paste (such as McNett's Sea Buff works well to clean masks and slates)
- Adhesives (Seal Cement / Aquaseal)
- Batteries for dive computers and dive lights
- Weight belt buckle (stainless steel is ideal)
- Weight keepers (stainless steel is ideal)
- Plastic buckles (for fins, crotch strap, etc.)
- Burst discs, valve packings and seats
- Intermediate pressure gauge
- Regulator service kits, seats, etc.

Tools
- Crescent (AKA adjustable) wrench
- Box end wrenches or Scuba Tool (available from local dive center)
- Metric and Imperial Allen keys (ball ended jack knife style are neatly
compacted)
- Screwdrivers/bits (Phillips, slot and Robertson)
- Swiss army knife
- Trauma shears
- Side cutters
- Lineman's pliers
- Needle nose pliers
- Tweezers
- O-ring picks (note: dental picks can easily scratch soft brass sealing surfaces)
- Cigarette lighter (to burn pilling off of nylon webbing and dry suit zippers)
- Battery tester
- Regulator specialty tools (CERTIFIED TECHNICIANS ONLY)
- Schrader valve tool

        And so it goes, etc. etc. and so on...

--
Randy F. Milak
~There's a fine line between thinking for yourself, and thinking of yourself!~

 
 
 

'Save A Dive' vs 'Spare Parts Kit'

Post by MHK » Fri, 06 Dec 2002 03:42:58


Randy,

Why not solve several of these problems before they occur rather then
relying on a save a dive kit???

Quote:
> - Mask strap (make sure it fits your mask!)

Why not use a slap strap in the first place???

Quote:
> - Fin strap (with buckle assemblies to make for fast replacement)

Why not use spring straps and you won't need to worry about broken straps..

Quote:
> - Snorkel keeper (old style works best and can double as an octopus

holder)

Leave the snorkel home and you won't need a snorkel keeper..

Quote:
> - Regulator mouthpiece and cable tie

Agreed

Quote:
> - Tank O-rings (usually size 2-014)

Agreed

Quote:
> - TIP: An excellent save a dive kit is probably available from your local
dive
> center.

Just my thoughts on trying to prevent the problem before it occurs..

Later

 
 
 

'Save A Dive' vs 'Spare Parts Kit'

Post by Pope » Fri, 06 Dec 2002 04:00:01

Quote:
>Subject: Re: 'Save A Dive' vs 'Spare Parts Kit'

>Date: 12/4/02 1:42 PM Eastern Standard Time


>Randy,

>Why not solve several of these problems before they occur rather then
>relying on a save a dive kit???

>> - Mask strap (make sure it fits your mask!)

>Why not use a slap strap in the first place???

    Most of my friends hate them.

Quote:
>> - Fin strap (with buckle assemblies to make for fast replacement)

>Why not use spring straps and you won't need to worry about broken straps..

  There was a guy at the quarry last week with a broken springstrap on his
Jets. Having no spare parts, he was done for the day.

  Too bad he didn't have *** straps, everybody had a spare.

Quote:
>> - Snorkel keeper (old style works best and can double as an octopus
>holder)

>Leave the snorkel home and you won't need a snorkel keeper..

  Have to vote yes here. :-)

Quote:
>> - Regulator mouthpiece and cable tie

>Agreed

>> - Tank O-rings (usually size 2-014)

>Agreed

>> - TIP: An excellent save a dive kit is probably available from your local
>dive
>> center.

>Just my thoughts on trying to prevent the problem before it occurs..

>Later

  Entire fin buckle assy., not just the strap.

  Cam strap for your tank. I busted one once (the cam buckle), and had a spare.

  I also carry two spare hoses (lp&hp).

                                       Popeye
                    It may be that your sole purpose in life
                    is simply to serve as warning to others.

 
 
 

'Save A Dive' vs 'Spare Parts Kit'

Post by James Goddar » Fri, 06 Dec 2002 04:07:09


Quote:


> Randy,

> Why not solve several of these problems before they occur rather then
> relying on a save a dive kit???

> > - Mask strap (make sure it fits your mask!)

> Why not use a slap strap in the first place???

Pardon my confusion here, but I thought you were a big DIR proponent and
slap straps are not DIR?

(Not bashing, just curious.)

 
 
 

'Save A Dive' vs 'Spare Parts Kit'

Post by A7WIE » Fri, 06 Dec 2002 05:02:40

Don't forget a book- some paperback you have be meaning to read in a ziplock.

Why- cause if you can't fix 'whatever you hoped to' and have to sit out you
will be really glad to have something to do other than just watch bubbles.

Blue Skies and Calm Seas,
Andrew

 
 
 

'Save A Dive' vs 'Spare Parts Kit'

Post by Christian Lescuye » Fri, 06 Dec 2002 07:42:39

Quote:
> > - Mask strap (make sure it fits your mask!)

> Why not use a slap strap in the first place???

What's a slap strap?

Christian

 
 
 

'Save A Dive' vs 'Spare Parts Kit'

Post by Fiona Watso » Fri, 06 Dec 2002 07:52:56

Quote:

> Before a diver can assemble a "save a dive kit" or a "spare parts kit",
one first
>needs to assess the spare parts and accessory needs of their equipment.
For most
>divers, there is no need to carry superfluous items that do not apply to
their
>gear. Exceptions may be divemasters and instructors whom sometimes need to
>compensate for their students lack of planning etc..  The suggestion is to
not
>rely on these individuals but rather to gain the mindset that is required
to plan
>ahead for oneself.  The diver will gain a sense of accomplishment and maybe
even
>impress their fellow divers when they solve equipment problems on their

own.

Or possibly make sure if its off shore or away, that everyone on the boat
has the same fittings/hoses second stages and stuff, so you can carry one
larger spares box with you ( complete with every single o-ring you could
possibly want except the one you really need right now!)

And you missed off spare o2cells and the thingy-device to get into a unit to
start with.

 
 
 

'Save A Dive' vs 'Spare Parts Kit'

Post by Christopher Painte » Fri, 06 Dec 2002 07:58:54


Quote:
> What's a slap strap?

That stupid noeprene thing you put over the mask strap to keep your hair
from getting tangled and try to look cool.    I never use one since my hair
is cut very short and I'm usually wearing a 7mil hood anyways.

Chris

 
 
 

'Save A Dive' vs 'Spare Parts Kit'

Post by nos.. » Fri, 06 Dec 2002 08:01:41


Quote:
> > > - Mask strap (make sure it fits your mask!)

> > Why not use a slap strap in the first place???

> What's a slap strap?

It's a neoprene mask strap.  They don't rip your hair from
your head like the conventional straps.
 
 
 

'Save A Dive' vs 'Spare Parts Kit'

Post by Pope » Fri, 06 Dec 2002 08:13:05

Quote:

>Date: 12/4/02 5:58 PM Eastern Standard Time



>> What's a slap strap?

>That stupid noeprene thing you put over the mask strap to keep your hair
>from getting tangled and try to look cool.    I never use one since my hair
>is cut very short and I'm usually wearing a 7mil hood anyways.

>Chris

  Chris, a Slap Strap is an entire mask band, with velco and elastic. Keeps
adjustment, but stretches a bit. They may also make the strap pads as well. I
have an IANTD pad -over- a slap strap, suits me fine, but most of my friends
don't like them.

                                       Popeye
                    It may be that your sole purpose in life
                    is simply to serve as warning to others.

 
 
 

'Save A Dive' vs 'Spare Parts Kit'

Post by bullshar » Fri, 06 Dec 2002 08:43:41


<snip composition>

Good thoughts Randy. Thanks for taking the time to
organize and write them down.
--
safe diving,

bullshark

 
 
 

'Save A Dive' vs 'Spare Parts Kit'

Post by bullshar » Fri, 06 Dec 2002 08:45:49

Quote:

> That stupid noeprene thing you put over the mask strap to keep your hair
> from getting tangled and try to look cool.

A) Not stupid
B) Doesn't go over the mask strap
C) It doesn't look cool
D) It is plush-lined neoprene wetsuit fabric

What it does is *replace* your mask strap and holds your mask in
place by light friction over a wide area.

Result: near ZERO pressure required to hold your mask on
Result: no stress on the strap or mask or the strap buckles
Result: no ring-face
Result: if you have hair, it doesn't tear it out
Result: it is much easier to put on and take off w/ or w/o a hood

--
safe diving,

bullshark

 
 
 

'Save A Dive' vs 'Spare Parts Kit'

Post by Christopher Painte » Fri, 06 Dec 2002 09:48:51


Quote:
> Result: near ZERO pressure required to hold your mask on
> Result: no stress on the strap or mask or the strap buckles
> Result: no ring-face
> Result: if you have hair, it doesn't tear it out
> Result: it is much easier to put on and take off w/ or w/o a hood

Result?  I don't have any of those problems in the first place.

Chris

 
 
 

'Save A Dive' vs 'Spare Parts Kit'

Post by Cameron - N » Fri, 06 Dec 2002 09:57:30

Good Informative Post!

;)



Quote:
> Before a diver can assemble a "save a dive kit" or a "spare parts kit",
one first
> needs to assess the spare parts and accessory needs of their equipment.
For most
> divers, there is no need to carry superfluous items that do not apply to
their
> gear. Exceptions may be divemasters and instructors whom sometimes need to
> compensate for their students lack of planning etc..  The suggestion is to
not
> rely on these individuals but rather to gain the mindset that is required
to plan
> ahead for oneself.  The diver will gain a sense of accomplishment and
maybe even
> impress their fellow divers when they solve equipment problems on their
own.

> One can easily draw a distinction between a "save a dive kit" and a "spare
parts
> kit".  Physical size is the first obvious distinction.  Save a dive kits
usually
> consist of commonly used repair items (mask/fins straps et al.) which make
for
> last minute unexpected repairs just prior to a dive.  Conversely, spare
parts kits
> may contain all the items of the save a dive kit (at the divers
discretion) in
> addition to consumables and accessory items necessary for gear maintenance
and
> reconfiguration prior to departure to the dive site (e.g., DIN fill
adapters,
> lubricants, cable ties,***tubing, mouthpieces etc.)

> While two different kits may appear to bring about more confusion, they
actually
> have the potential to streamline the amount of gear one carries aboard
when used
> correctly.  A common practice is to take the smaller save a dive kit on
board and
> leave the spare parts kit in the vehicle.  Space on board any vessel is at
a
> premium.  Tackle boxes and tote bins full of spare parts/superfluous gear,
takes
> up valuable space and should be totally unnecessary.  Gear maintenance and
> configuration should already be completed prior to departure and therefore
only
> the 'save a dive kit' inventory appears necessary on board.

> There is no substitute for proper regular maintenance by a trained
technician.
> Regardless of skill level, all divers should inspect all of their gear
prior to
> departure.  Even annoyances such as broken fin or mask straps don't
usually happen
> without warning.  Worn, cracked, hard or torn *** or silicone straps
should be
> discovered well in advance of dive departure and replaced well ahead of
failure.
> Therefore, with proper inspection and maintenance, the diver should
theoretically
> not require any spare parts/superfluous gear on board the dive vessel.

> As durable and reliable as our equipment is, and regardless of how
vigilant the
> gear inspections made, our dive equipment is not impervious to failure at
a most
> inconvenient place and time.  Hence the need for 'save a dive' and 'spare
parts
> kits'. However, be courteous to your fellow diver and leave the tackle
boxes and
> tote bins full of superfluous items off the dive vessel.  Inspect and
replace as
> necessary well ahead of time.  The following is a compilation of suggested
items
> for both save a dive kits and spare parts kits, though hardly exhaustive:

> Save A Dive Kit

> - Mask strap (make sure it fits your mask!)
> - Fin strap (with buckle assemblies to make for fast replacement)
> - Snorkel keeper (old style works best and can double as an octopus
holder)
> - Regulator mouthpiece and cable tie
> - Tank O-rings (usually size 2-014)
> - TIP: An excellent save a dive kit is probably available from your local
dive
> center.

> Spare Parts Kit

> Consumables
> - Cable ties, various sizes
> -***tubing (retain long secondary hose, lift bags, consoles, slate
pencils,
> etc.)
> - Bicycle tire tube ("10-speed" size works best to retain unruly hoses)
> - Elastic (AKA Bungee) cord
> - Short nylon braided line
> - O-rings (check with your local dive center for proper sizes and
materials)
> - Lubricants (silicone grease, DOW 111, DOW 777, Christo-Lube, Krytox,
etc.)
> - Dry suit zipper wax and cleaner (wax the suit zipper before you board)
> - Wet suit cleaner (Mirazyme seems to work well)
> - Tape (duct, electrical, hockey, etc.)
> - Pencil, eraser, pen and marker
> - Bulbs for your dive lights
> - Fuses (for most canister lights)
> - Mask defog gel or drops
> - Abrasive paste (such as McNett's Sea Buff works well to clean masks and
slates)
> - Adhesives (Seal Cement / Aquaseal)
> - Batteries for dive computers and dive lights
> - Weight belt buckle (stainless steel is ideal)
> - Weight keepers (stainless steel is ideal)
> - Plastic buckles (for fins, crotch strap, etc.)
> - Burst discs, valve packings and seats
> - Intermediate pressure gauge
> - Regulator service kits, seats, etc.

> Tools
> - Crescent (AKA adjustable) wrench
> - Box end wrenches or Scuba Tool (available from local dive center)
> - Metric and Imperial Allen keys (ball ended jack knife style are neatly
> compacted)
> - Screwdrivers/bits (Phillips, slot and Robertson)
> - Swiss army knife
> - Trauma shears
> - Side cutters
> - Lineman's pliers
> - Needle nose pliers
> - Tweezers
> - O-ring picks (note: dental picks can easily scratch soft brass sealing
surfaces)
> - Cigarette lighter (to burn pilling off of nylon webbing and dry suit
zippers)
> - Battery tester
> - Regulator specialty tools (CERTIFIED TECHNICIANS ONLY)
> - Schrader valve tool

> And so it goes, etc. etc. and so on...

> --
> Randy F. Milak
> ~There's a fine line between thinking for yourself, and thinking of

yourself!~
 
 
 

'Save A Dive' vs 'Spare Parts Kit'

Post by MR MOTOz » Fri, 06 Dec 2002 10:56:40

Quote:

>Date: 12/4/02 12:31 PM Central Standard Time

<snip good description of parts kit>

A couple of things that I like to take in addition to what you listed are:

1.  Spare reg
2. Cyalume sticks
3.  First Aid Kit
4.  Emergency Blanket

Ron White
Owner, The Cave Connection
http://www.caveconnection.com/Index.html