Diving compressor

Diving compressor

Post by Steve » Mon, 09 Apr 2012 11:48:40


Diving compressors, both for filling bottles, and for surface supplied air,
use different crankcase lubricants.  Mainly a mineral based instead of a
petroleum based to avoid lipid pneumonia.

Does anyone know if it is acceptable to use a compressor component that has
been flushed of petroleum products, and replaced with mineral oil?  The
operating pressure would be less than 200 psi, nowhere up to the 2,000#psi
of scuba bottles.

Steve

 
 
 

Diving compressor

Post by RayC » Mon, 09 Apr 2012 14:57:52


Quote:
> Diving compressors, both for filling bottles, and for surface supplied air,
> use different crankcase lubricants.  Mainly a mineral based instead of a
> petroleum based to avoid lipid pneumonia.

> Does anyone know if it is acceptable to use a compressor component that has
> been flushed of petroleum products, and replaced with mineral oil?  The
> operating pressure would be less than 200 psi, nowhere up to the 2,000#psi
> of scuba bottles.

> Steve

I think you will find that most modern breathing air compressor
suppliers have moved away from mineral oil and over to synthetic
compressor oil.

As for using a "component" that has been used in a different oil, it
just needs to be cleaned of any gunk and then it should be good.  When
you change oil types, sometimes any buildup may be loosened by the new
oil and can go floating around in the system ... sometimes clogging up
oil grooves, oil pumps, lines, etc.

--

Ray
+++++++++++++++++++++++
www.CompressorStuff.com

 
 
 

Diving compressor

Post by Ray » Thu, 12 Apr 2012 20:47:05


Quote:
> I don't know how much cleaning is involved in your "flush". It does not
> take many milligrams of oil to make a pneumonia.

> Also, I am not sure what oil you regard as safe. "Mineral" means petroleum
> last I learned about these things. The lubrication needs to support the
> temperature and pressure, be compatible with lungs, be edible, and be
> O2 safe. I got 2 liters of such oil from coltri for $200.

> -- mrr

If someone told you that oil was compatible with lungs, even the food
grade stuff, they didn't know what they were talking about.  Oil that
gets breathed in ... even cooking oil, can coat the inside of the lungs
and stop the transfer of oxygen.

And if they said that oil was O2 safe, again they didn't know what they
were talking about.  There are two oils that are used in the Coltri
machines ... standard synthetic (750 in EU and 751 in Americas) and a
food grade synthetic for the Nitrox machines (466).  And the oil in the
Nitrox machines just HAPPENS to be food grade.  The fact is that it is
used because it oxidizes slower in Nitrox than the standard stuff.

But I am sure glad that we stock it in the US and don't have to go to EU
for oil.  It is only about $50 per gallon here ... not $100 per liter!

--
Ray Contreras
=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
http://www.CompressorStuff.com