On checking chest straps

On checking chest straps

Post by BigD » Sun, 21 Jan 2001 03:46:36


I always hook my thumb inside my chest strap and give it a firm tug.
If I misrouted it the strap would come loose.
Its something I always do no matter what. I read too many articles
about people getting killed because of this.

Blue skies

 
 
 

On checking chest straps

Post by Flyincam » Sun, 21 Jan 2001 04:32:06

Quote:
>I always hook my thumb inside my chest strap and give it a firm tug.
>If I misrouted it the strap would come loose.
>Its something I always do no matter what. I read too many articles
>about people getting killed because of this.

>Blue skies

Even better idea..... LOOK AT IT.
I look at my chest strap buckle several times on the flight up, just in case it
somehow magically came undone. ;-)

Jan Devil

 
 
 

On checking chest straps

Post by d2.. » Sun, 21 Jan 2001 05:01:56

Hey, lets take a look at the other person's chest strap too. I agree
that there have been way too many fatalities from such a simple thing.

Get up, Fall down, No problem!
sigsby

Sent via Deja.com
http://www.deja.com/

 
 
 

On checking chest straps

Post by freefalle » Sun, 21 Jan 2001 08:17:35

I agree,I  check my chest strap and pilot chute several times on the way up
and leg straps just on jump run also its a good idea to check for a
misrouted chest strap which is very easy to get wrapped around the harness
while getting into the rig.
--
Those who turn low shall inherit the Earth
Matt
Quote:

> Hey, lets take a look at the other person's chest strap too. I agree
> that there have been way too many fatalities from such a simple thing.

> Get up, Fall down, No problem!
> sigsby

> Sent via Deja.com
> http://www.deja.com/

 
 
 

On checking chest straps

Post by cyberskyd.. » Sun, 21 Jan 2001 09:00:05

Definately, the dzo caught my misrouted strap once, loading the plane
when I was just off student status. I routed around the buckle instead
of through it somehow??  Opened my eyes to ALWAYS double check, and I
generally make it habit to look at everyone elses as well. Look out for
each other too! :)



Quote:
> I always hook my thumb inside my chest strap and give it a firm tug.
> If I misrouted it the strap would come loose.
> Its something I always do no matter what. I read too many articles
> about people getting killed because of this.

> Blue skies

Sent via Deja.com
http://www.deja.com/
 
 
 

On checking chest straps

Post by James Chie » Sun, 21 Jan 2001 15:00:14

How about put the B-12 or the flat type connector on the chest strap? We trust
them on our leg straps, and helmets. Does this break any rules, laws?

Quote:

> I agree,I  check my chest strap and pilot chute several times on the way up
> and leg straps just on jump run also its a good idea to check for a
> misrouted chest strap which is very easy to get wrapped around the harness
> while getting into the rig.

--

  "I live with fear and terror, but sometimes I leave them and
   go skydiving"
 
 
 

On checking chest straps

Post by Craig » Sun, 21 Jan 2001 15:32:58

Personally I don't care for B-12's, yes they are easy to get in and out
of, but they have their own set of problems.  I couldn't imagine using
them on a chest strap.  IMO the friction adapters already on chest
straps are fine, why fix something that is not broken?  It is not so
much an equipment failure, as is a failure to properly check equipment.

Craig

Quote:

> How about put the B-12 or the flat type connector on the chest strap?
> We trust them on our leg straps, and helmets. Does this break any
> rules, laws?


>> I agree,I  check my chest strap and pilot chute several times on the
>> way up
>> and leg straps just on jump run also its a good idea to check for a
>> misrouted chest strap which is very easy to get wrapped around the
>> harness
>> while getting into the rig.

> --

>   "I live with fear and terror, but sometimes I leave them and
>    go skydiving"

 
 
 

On checking chest straps

Post by Paul W. Gib » Mon, 22 Jan 2001 02:33:59

Quote:
>Hey, lets take a look at the other person's chest strap too. I agree
>that there have been way too many fatalities from such a simple thing.

>Get up, Fall down, No problem!
>sigsby

Ya know, after a recent fatality caused by an unsecured chest strap, I told
myself just how tenacious I was about checking my own gear and having someone
else check it for me.  I told myself "I ALWAYS check and double check...this
will never happen to me".  To make a long story short, I almost got on the
plane a couple weekends ago with my chest strap flappin' in the breeze.  So
much for tenacity.  Made for a nice wake-up-call.  If ya think you're good to
go, CHECK IT AGAIN.  Got nothing better to do on the ride up anyways!  Lets be
safe out there!
Blues!
-Paul
"Climbing as we fall, we dare to hold on to our fate.  To steal away our
destiny to catch ourselves with quiet grace"                   -INXS  "The
Stairs"
 
 
 

On checking chest straps

Post by John » Mon, 22 Jan 2001 08:36:21

Odd, I've never heard of someone getting killed by putting thier thumb
through thier chest strap and tugging on it.............
what happened?????

john

 
 
 

On checking chest straps

Post by D168 » Mon, 22 Jan 2001 13:20:45

Quote:

> To make a long story short, I almost got on the
>plane a couple weekends ago with my chest strap flappin' in the breeze.

One of the nice things about chest mounted altimeters is that it reminds you to
secure that strap, lest you drop it on the  walk to the aircraft.

Tom B

 
 
 

On checking chest straps

Post by Winsor Naugler II » Wed, 24 Jan 2001 13:22:06


Quote:
> I always hook my thumb inside my chest strap and give it a firm tug.
> If I misrouted it the strap would come loose.
> Its something I always do no matter what. I read too many articles
> about people getting killed because of this.

This is a good policy.

My preferred approach is not to undo any straps in the first place, and to
check them as though I did.  I put on and take off my rig by loosening, but
not undoing, leg and chest straps.

I've considered sewing my chest straps in place, like I do with adjustable
harness straps, but figure that it's a bad idea for water landings.  A hook
knife would work just fine, but that assumes I don't drop the damned thing.

In any event, checking three rings, three straps and three handles, once
before boarding the plane, once when seated, and once before climbout, seems
like a reasonable minimum that I routinely exceed.

Blue skies,

Winsor