Place

Place

Post by SKYDI » Thu, 10 Jun 1993 13:51:50



Fido-To: all

I jumped at Paris, Ca. I would like to find a place to jump where
you are not connected by a rope to someone else.
Later

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--- eecp 1.45 LM2

 * Origin: Bad-Boy's BBS (1:102/842)
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Place

Post by Mel Andr » Mon, 14 Jun 1993 04:40:41

Quote:


>Fido-To: all

>I jumped at Paris, Ca. I would like to find a place to jump where
>you are not connected by a rope to someone else.
>Later

>--- Maximus 2.01wb
>--- eecp 1.45 LM2

> * Origin: Bad-Boy's BBS (1:102/842)
>--
>SKYDIVE - via FidoNet node 1:233/13    (ehsnet.fidonet.org)

Sounds like you are talking about a static-line jump. One end of a
woven strap is attached to the aircraft, and the other end is attached
to the pilot chute. When you fall away from the aircraft the static
line deploys the main parachute system. This method of training is
often called the progressive method. After you have demonstrated the
ability to pull your own ripcord, you begin freefall training. First
a delay of just a few seconds, then going for progressively longer
delays. An alternative method is Accelerated Freefall (AFF). This is
where two jumpmasters exit the aircraft with you at ~12,000', and you
have ~45 second delays. With AFF you learn body flight faster, and the
jumps are more expensive. Not only is the progressive method less
expensive, but there is something to be said for the experience of
exiting aircraft at lower altitudes.
I thought they offered both types of training at Perris Valley. If not
there are others in Southern California. Check your yellow pages, make
phone calls, ask questions. I suggest that one of those questions let
you know if the place is a USPA group member.

                                        Mel

ps read the FAQ
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