The DEATH loop - chest strap misrouting

The DEATH loop - chest strap misrouting

Post by BRENT J FINL » Wed, 27 Sep 1995 04:00:00


A friend of mine (newtimer, 100 jumps , 40 of them on squares in the last
year) told me he lost his hook knife Saturday.  He dumped and watched it fly
from his chest.  Seems he had simply looped his chest strap around the links
instead of threading it through.  I've seen this happen before, but it usually
gets caught on the plane.  (of course, Greg is rarely in his rig anyway...)

Has anyone else seen this and
- caught it on the plane,
- seen it jumped that way,
- heard of anyone flipping out and hung on by their legs,
- heard of anyone flipping out completely for a short, but exciting last
freefall?

Brent

 
 
 

The DEATH loop - chest strap misrouting

Post by DZvagaB » Wed, 27 Sep 1995 04:00:00

Quote:
>Seems he had simply looped his chest strap around the links
>instead of threading it through.  I've seen this happen before, but it
usually
>gets caught on the plane.  (of course, Greg is rarely in his rig

anyway...)

Quote:
>Has anyone else seen this and

Okay, I'm not proud of this.....but if it serves a purpose....

When I first bought my rig, I misrouted my chest strap.  Just as you
described above.  When I deployed, my chest strap flung open, but stayed
in the *** band stow.  It felt REALLY loose for the rest of the canopy
ride.  Out of sheer paranoia, I kept my hands on my rear risers the whole
time, and didn't make and radical turns.

Someone told me that unless I deployed in a track, it would be near
impossible to fall out.  Most of the impact of opening shock is taken by
the leg straps.

Needless to say, I always double....triple check my leg and chest straps.
(Metal, metal, metal)....sure would suck to fall out of your rig!

Safe Blue Skies,

Bonnie

 
 
 

The DEATH loop - chest strap misrouting

Post by TSW » Wed, 27 Sep 1995 04:00:00

Did a 4 way w/ a friend who was jumping borrowed gear a while back.  
During a transition I noticed that his leg straps appeared to be down
around his knees, I pointed - he indicated he knew and wanted to go on -
I thought "man that's gonna hurt on opening" and we continued with the
dive.

At breakoff the rest of us tracked away and he dumped in place.  
Apparently just before I noticed his legstraps he noticed that his chest
strap was undone (he had misrouted it).  Said he was pretty scared, but
that when he threw out he grabbed his arms out in front of him to make
sure he didn't fall out.

The real bummer was the altimaster II that he apparently lost in
freefall off his cheststrap!

bsbd,
tsw
---------------------------------------------------------
...And once you have tasted flight, you will walk the earth with your
eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you long to
return....

 
 
 

The DEATH loop - chest strap misrouting

Post by Dann » Wed, 27 Sep 1995 04:00:00

I also misrouted my chest strap (about jump 50).  Fortunately, it was
caught during my gear check.  Like Bonnie, I always triple check all of my
straps now, and always ask for (at least one) pin check.

Blue skies and secure straps,

Danne

 
 
 

The DEATH loop - chest strap misrouting

Post by Buzz Fi » Thu, 28 Sep 1995 04:00:00

Quote:
>A friend of mine (newtimer, 100 jumps , 40 of them on squares in the
last
>year) told me he lost his hook knife Saturday.  He dumped and watched it
fly
>from his chest.  Seems he had simply looped his chest strap around the
links
>instead of threading it through.  I've seen this happen before, but it
usually
>gets caught on the plane.  (of course, Greg is rarely in his rig anyway..
)

>Has anyone else seen this and
>- caught it on the plane,
>- seen it jumped that way,
>- heard of anyone flipping out and hung on by their legs,
>- heard of anyone flipping out completely for a short, but exciting
last
>freefall?

>Brent

Yes, I have caught this on jumpers several times.  In fact, just this
last weekend my roommate, who has 370 jump, had this happen to him.  I
was in the back of the King Air and he was following out a 4 way.  When
he got to the van, he informed us all of how stupid he felt.

It takes a big man (or woman) to admit this.  But it helps for others to
learn from it.

Brent,
Thanks for the post!

The Buzzman
DZO, Air Adventures Skydiving, Inc.

 
 
 

The DEATH loop - chest strap misrouting

Post by Randy Rieck » Thu, 28 Sep 1995 04:00:00

I have a paranoia about this and find myself checking everyone in the
plane visually on the way up to altitude.  So far, I have cought and
warned three people about misrouted chest straps.

I also check my own several times on the way up.  A little paranoid,
maybe... but it passes the time on the lift!  :-)

Randy Riecks
***ia

 
 
 

The DEATH loop - chest strap misrouting

Post by Bob Chur » Thu, 28 Sep 1995 04:00:00


Quote:

> Someone told me that unless I deployed in a track, it would be near
> impossible to fall out.  Most of the impact of opening shock is taken by
> the leg straps.

> Needless to say, I always double....triple check my leg and chest straps.
> (Metal, metal, metal)....sure would suck to fall out of your rig!

> Safe Blue Skies,

> Bonnie

We had one for the record books at Ravenswood. There are others on this
group who saw it, or I wouldn't ask anyone to believe it. A new jumper,
about sixty years old, real nice, relaxed kind of guy, was making a
short delay. He tumbled off the step and opened into a mess. Those who
saw it (and I didn't, I'm afraid) couldn't understand what he was
doing. The canopy was in a slow turn, obviously on its own. He was too
far away for anyone to get a good look at. They rushed over and found
him with his face *all* messed up, including a broken nose. The wierd
thing is that he didn't seem to mind. He was laughing. Turned out he
had good reason to be happy. When he tumbled he got lines wrapped
around him. He had an open canopy, but had some lines under one leg.
This had the slider shoved into his head so he was in a crouch with his
face pressed into his chest. The details are a little fuzzy, even to
him. Anyway, he proceeded to clear the mess by rolling up tight and
pushing everything above his head. This included his chest strap. He
fell out of the harness and caught his foot on the leg strap. He was
*** upside down by the front of one foot. He was afraid to try and
reach up, and at the same time afraid the muscles in his foot would
give out. All this from about 2000' feet on down. He hit pretty much
face first, but it was a Manta, and no serious injuries. I don't blame
you for not believing this, but Mike Spurgeon can verify it. He was
there, as well as Max, Don Wise and several jumpers. It was a hell of a
thing. The guy was really good natured about it. He wasn't a couch
potato. He may have been getting on, but I'm sure some military
organization has a well guarded employee file on him.
The best part was when his wife got over to where they were. When she
heard what happened she said "did you think about me?"

His answer, no shit, was "Yeh, but I held on anyway".

Bob (truth is stranger than fiction) Church

 
 
 

The DEATH loop - chest strap misrouting

Post by Bill Wil » Thu, 28 Sep 1995 04:00:00

Has anyone else seen this and
- caught it on the plane,        yes

- seen it jumped that way,        yes

- heard of anyone flipping out and hung on by their legs,  yes

- heard of anyone flipping out completely for a short, but
exciting last
freefall?                        not unintentionally

Bill

--
   _=____________________-                  

   |//////_______________|
    \       /| (  )/        *gun control is hitting your target

    /      /) -----    
   /    o /)          *ted kennedy killed more people with his

  /P7M13 /)             car than I have with my guns....
 /o_____/)  
              *those who cannot remember history are doomed to
repeat it

 
 
 

The DEATH loop - chest strap misrouting

Post by Charles Thoma » Thu, 28 Sep 1995 04:00:00


Quote:

>Has anyone else seen this and
>- caught it on the plane,
>- seen it jumped that way,
>- heard of anyone flipping out and hung on by their legs,
>- heard of anyone flipping out completely for a short, but exciting last
>freefall?

I was walking out to the plane (had about 17 jumps at the time) when the
S&TA at my old DZ said "Who gave you a rigger's check?".  

Seems that I'd done what your friend did, put the chest strap around the
hardware and velcro'ed it to itself without threading it under the
restraining bar.

Well, to this day, not only do I check my own about a hundred times on
the way to altitude, but anyone else's I happen to look at in the plane.

Anyone else notice that doing front float on a King Air will blow your
chest strap from its properly adjusted position to the loosest possible
position (even with an elastic restraining band)?

 
 
 

The DEATH loop - chest strap misrouting

Post by Florian Rieg » Thu, 28 Sep 1995 04:00:00

At a DZ in Oregon this summer I saw a girl (new in the sport, totally nervous
before every jump so that she was geared up already 45 minutes before it was
time to be; I'm sure she had very strange reasons to start skydiving) anyway
she tried to be funny, maybe for hiding her fear, and looped her cheststrap
the loose way, fixing the end on the velcro. Her boyfriend, an experienced
jumper I guess, saw this and went kind of berserk. Good for her, I guess, but
on the other hand, she would have gotten this most exciting very last
freefall.

Green skies
IT'S SPRUNGVERGNUEGEN!
Flo

- via BulkRate 2.0

 
 
 

The DEATH loop - chest strap misrouting

Post by Keith Abne » Fri, 29 Sep 1995 04:00:00

I am not afraid to admit that as a student I did the same
thing...Got in an all-fired hurry to get on the next lift
and rushed up to get a JM check before getting on UH-60.  
Fortunately, my JM caught it.  I think I did this a total
of two times as a student.

I have my JM ticket myself now, and I always remember what
I did when checking my students, because I did it myself.  
We also check the up-jumpers too.

Might say, while checking each other in aircraft is ok,
Everyone ought to get a JMPI on the ground PRIOR to
entering the aircraft.  I beleive students are getting a
good check, but rarely on civilian DZ's do I see people
checking their friends out.  There's nothing embarrasing
about asking someone, "how about a JMPI?"  It just makes
good sense.

 
 
 

The DEATH loop - chest strap misrouting

Post by Dan K » Fri, 29 Sep 1995 04:00:00



Quote:

>His answer, no shit, was "Yeh, but I held on anyway".

>Bob (truth is stranger than fiction) Church

LOL, no... FOTCL, no... there isn't a TLA that quite expresses "laughed
like a hysterical hyena for about 5 mins"

--
Dan:)
-x-

 
 
 

The DEATH loop - chest strap misrouting

Post by John R. Wardlaw, DV » Fri, 29 Sep 1995 04:00:00


Quote:
FINLEY) writes:

>...  Seems he had simply looped his chest strap around the links
>instead of threading it through.  I've seen this happen before, ...

>Has anyone else seen this and
>- caught it on the plane,

Been there, with fewer than 100 jumps.  It hasn't happened a second
time.

DawgDoc,

 
 
 

The DEATH loop - chest strap misrouting

Post by Trying2F » Mon, 02 Oct 1995 04:00:00


Quote:
Rieger) writes:
>, and looped her cheststrap
>the loose way, fixing the end on the velcro., she would have gotten this

most exciting very last

Quote:
>freefall.

I doubt it. She probably would have lost an altimeter. but it is kind of
hard to fall out of your rig.
 
 
 

The DEATH loop - chest strap misrouting

Post by Robert Anders » Mon, 02 Oct 1995 04:00:00

Quote:
>At breakoff the rest of us tracked away and he dumped in place.  
>Apparently just before I noticed his legstraps he noticed that his chest
>strap was undone (he had misrouted it).  Said he was pretty scared, but
>that when he threw out he grabbed his arms out in front of him to make
>sure he didn't fall out.

That is something that seems to be IMHO a weakness in the current harness
designs- the fact that the cheststrap can come loose or be misrouted.  We
were talking about this at our DZ this weekend- stories of people who had
fallen out of their rigs because of no chest strap.  Kind of scary...