Hot Resetting Rear Triangle

Hot Resetting Rear Triangle

Post by Tho X. Bu » Fri, 10 Sep 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> if the bike was hit hard enough to damage the rear end, then it must be put on
> an alignment table. It is the ONLY way to do it accurately. In addition to the
> distance between the dropout faces-the dropouts must be set at the identical
> height, be perfectly parallel and evenly spaced from the centerline of a
> straight seatube. In most bikes I have fixed-I invariably find the front
> triangle out a bit,too. The alignment table allows me to index the seatube,
> then the front triangle, then the rear triangle. On most frames-I can make them
> as good or even better than new. There is no other acceptable way. the stupid
> string method, H-tools etc might fix one problem-but they usually compound
> another.Find a good shop with a table and pay the $75 and get it done right.

:-)

Well, there might be no other way if you're charging money for it.  

"Perfect" alignment has never been necessary on a bicycle.  It's nice,
like filed custom lugs, or fancy paint job, but many many many fine
bikes have been made through the years with out the need for an aligment
table.  I built a folding bike that can be ridden with up to 2"
alignment offset between front and rear wheel.  Guess what? I can take
it to 30 mph just fine.  Feels a little weird for a minute or two, but
it works.

I'd say that if we take 99.99% of the bicycles off the shelves today and
put it on an alignment table, you'll find that they are no where near
perfect. Fine European custom builders built good bikes for many years
without one, well before Americans get on the scene with the 70's bike
craze.

Pay the money if you desire perfection in life (assuming that you can
find such an animal within a 60 mile radius).  Some people rather spend
it on fancy lycra.  Probably more useful.

It's only a bike, and it's doesn't have to be a aerospace precision
tool.  It can be, but it's not truthful to claim that it has to be.

Tho

 
 
 

Hot Resetting Rear Triangle

Post by Bikefi » Sat, 11 Sep 1999 04:00:00

if the bike was hit hard enough to damage the rear end, then it must be put on
an alignment table. It is the ONLY way to do it accurately. In addition to the
distance between the dropout faces-the dropouts must be set at the identical
height, be perfectly parallel and evenly spaced from the centerline of a
straight seatube. In most bikes I have fixed-I invariably find the front
triangle out a bit,too. The alignment table allows me to index the seatube,
then the front triangle, then the rear triangle. On most frames-I can make them
as good or even better than new. There is no other acceptable way. the stupid
string method, H-tools etc might fix one problem-but they usually compound
another.Find a good shop with a table and pay the $75 and get it done right.