New Wheels=New Components?

New Wheels=New Components?

Post by Sheldon Brow » Wed, 30 Oct 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

> Hi-
> I'm pretty sure this subject has been gone over in this newsgroup, but I
> was hoping to get a quick list of the parts I will need to change out
> when replacing my 105 equipt bike's rear wheel with a 8spd Campy hub and
> cassett version.  I use downtube shifting, mostly on friction mode.
> Will I need a new derailer or will I be able to reach all gears by
> fiddling with the 105 derailer's hi/low adjustment screws?  

It will probably work without any adjustment whatsoever, though it won't
shift as well as the Shimano stuff.  The Shimano hubs are better than the
current Campagnolo products, my advice would be to stick with Shimano.

If I did

Quote:
> want to use indexing, would I need the Campy shifters, or is there
> another way to go, say different cassett spacers?  

The shifters go with the derailer.  As long as you are using a Shimano
derailer, you should stick with Shimano shifters.  If you change one,
you will probably need to change both at the same time to get the indexing to work.

Quote:
> I'll probably be using a Sachs chain.  

Good idea.

Quote:
> I need new wheels now but was hoping to spread the
> price of a complete new component group out over a bit of time, although
> with the demise of 8spd rear production I may not have as much as I had
> hoped...

Despite folklore, Shimano is currently better about supporting older systems
than Campagnolo. ERGO is better ergonomically than STI, but if you are going
to stick with down-tube levers, It seems to me that you are throwing away
money going to a more expensive system that doesn't work as well.

Sheldon "Heretic" Brown
Newtonville, Massachusetts
+--------------------------------------------+
|   When choosing between two evils,         |
|   I always like to try the one I've never  |
|   tried before."                           |
|                            -- Mae West     |
+--------------------------------------------+
http://www.sheldonbrown.com/biz/hub/
Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts
(617) 244-1040  FAX  244-1041

 
 
 

New Wheels=New Components?

Post by Mark Bjorg » Wed, 30 Oct 1996 04:00:00

Hi-
I'm pretty sure this subject has been gone over in this newsgroup, but I
was hoping to get a quick list of the parts I will need to change out
when replacing my 105 equipt bike's rear wheel with a 8spd Campy hub and
cassett version.  I use downtube shifting, mostly on friction mode.
Will I need a new derailer or will I be able to reach all gears by
fiddling with the 105 derailer's hi/low adjustment screws?  If I did
want to use indexing, would I need the Campy shifters, or is there
another way to go, say different cassett spacers?  I'll probably be
using a Sachs chain.  I need new wheels now but was hoping to spread the
price of a complete new component group out over a bit of time, although
with the demise of 8spd rear production I may not have as much as I had
hoped...  

Thanks!

Mark

 
 
 

New Wheels=New Components?

Post by Mark Bjorg » Wed, 30 Oct 1996 04:00:00

Quote:


> > I was hoping to get a quick list of the parts I will need to change out
> > when replacing my 105 equipt bike's rear wheel with a 8spd Campy hub and
> > cassett version.  I use downtube shifting, mostly on friction mode.
> > Will I need a new derailer or will I be able to reach all gears by
> > fiddling with the 105 derailer's hi/low adjustment screws?

> It will probably work without any adjustment whatsoever, though it won't
> shift as well as the Shimano stuff.  The Shimano hubs are better than the
> current Campagnolo products, my advice would be to stick with Shimano.

Sorry, but I was careless and left the fact that my current rear
derailer and hub are 7spd vintage out of my origional post.  That's what
my (above) rambling about limit adjustment screws was supposed to
pertained to.  Sooo...Can I use a 7spd 105 derailer with an 8spd Chorus
hub/Campy cassett?  About Campy v Shimano, the idea of having a set of
nice shiney wheels (and eventually other components) to mate up with the
chrome on the frame is too strong to resist...    

Quote:
> > If I did want to use indexing, would I need the Campy shifters, or is there
> > another way to go, say different cassett spacers?

> The shifters go with the derailer.  As long as you are using a Shimano
> derailer, you should stick with Shimano shifters.  If you change one,
> you will probably need to change both at the same time to get the indexing to work.

I guess that means that the 7spd levers will probably not pull enough
cable to get all 8spds of the new rear cassett, even if the derailer can
be adjusted, via tha limit screws, to do so?

Quote:
> > I'll probably be using a Sachs chain.
> Good idea.

Every now and again...

Quote:
> > I need new wheels now but was hoping to spread the
> > price of a complete new component group out over a bit of time, although
> > with the demise of 8spd rear production I may not have as much as I had
> > hoped...

> Despite folklore, Shimano is currently better about supporting older systems
> than Campagnolo. ERGO is better ergonomically than STI, but if you are going
> to stick with down-tube levers, It seems to me that you are throwing away
> money going to a more expensive system that doesn't work as well.

I have '95 Mirage Ergo levers on an Eros (nice bike, where the heck is
the fender clearence?), they are very comfortable and intuitive to
operate.  Unfortunately they haven't withstood crash damage well (and
car doors even worse).  That's why I'm using downtube shifters on a city
bike.  Low maintainance, cheap to keep.  Ahh, but one day...

Thanks sooo much,
Mark

BTW Sheldon, I know that you keep a page on how to remove stuck
seatposts from frames, would you tell me how I could remove four or so
inches of an aluminum seatpost that is  broken off maybe six inches into
the seat tube?  I didn't do it, scout's honor!