OT: NYT Book Review of "Traffic"

OT: NYT Book Review of "Traffic"

Post by Eric Ve » Sun, 10 Aug 2008 04:52:25


http://SportToday.org/

Traffic jams are not, by and large, caused by flaws in road design but
by flaws in human nature. While this is bad news for drivers theres
not much to be done about human nature it is good news for readers of
Tom Vanderbilts new book. Traffic is not a dry examination of highway
engineering; its a surprising, enlightening look at the psychology of
human beings behind the steering wheels.

An alternate title for the book might be Idiots. Vanderbilt, who
writes regularly about design and technology, cites a finding that 12.7
percent of the traffic slowdown after a crash has nothing to do with
wreckage blocking lanes; its caused by gawkers. ***neckers attend to
the spectacle so avidly that they themselves then get into accidents,
slamming into the car in front of them when it brakes to get a better
look or dig out a cellphone

to take a picture. (This happens often enough for traffic types to have
coined a word for it: digi-necking.) Exasperated highway professionals
have actually tried erecting anti-***necking screens around the
scenes of accidents, but the vehicle toting the screen typically gets
caught in the traffic jam its meant to prevent.

Moreover, Vanderbilt adds, there is the interest in the screen itself.
Drivers will slow down to look at anything: Something as simple as a
couch dumped in a roadside ditch can send minor shudders of curiosity
through the traffic flow. Traffic is jammed with these delicious
youve-got-to-be-kidding moments.

Even without home furnishings to distract us, we rarely seem to get
anywhere fast at any time of day. One reason, Vanderbilt reports, is
that people are driving to do things they once did at home or down the
block. It is not just that American households have more cars, he
writes, it is that they are finding new places to take them. Theyre
going someplace to eat. Theyre driving to Whole Foods because they
dont like the produce at their neighborhood supermarket. Theyre going
out to get coffee. (So much of Starbuckss revenue now comes from
drive-through lanes that the company will put stores across the street
from each other, sparing drivers the agony of having to make a left
turn during rush hour.)

[more]

 
 
 

OT: NYT Book Review of "Traffic"

Post by Woland9 » Sun, 10 Aug 2008 08:19:45


Quote:
> http://SportToday.org/

> Traffic jams are not, by and large, caused by flaws in road design but
> by flaws in human nature. While this is bad news for drivers theres
> not much to be done about human nature it is good news for readers of
> Tom Vanderbilts new book. Traffic is not a dry examination of highway
> engineering; its a surprising, enlightening look at the psychology of
> human beings behind the steering wheels.

> An alternate title for the book might be Idiots. Vanderbilt, who
> writes regularly about design and technology, cites a finding that 12.7
> percent of the traffic slowdown after a crash has nothing to do with
> wreckage blocking lanes; its caused by gawkers. ***neckers attend to
> the spectacle so avidly that they themselves then get into accidents,
> slamming into the car in front of them when it brakes to get a better
> look or dig out a cellphone

> to take a picture. (This happens often enough for traffic types to have
> coined a word for it: digi-necking.) Exasperated highway professionals
> have actually tried erecting anti-***necking screens around the
> scenes of accidents, but the vehicle toting the screen typically gets
> caught in the traffic jam its meant to prevent.

> Moreover, Vanderbilt adds, there is the interest in the screen itself.
> Drivers will slow down to look at anything: Something as simple as a
> couch dumped in a roadside ditch can send minor shudders of curiosity
> through the traffic flow. Traffic is jammed with these delicious
> youve-got-to-be-kidding moments.

> Even without home furnishings to distract us, we rarely seem to get
> anywhere fast at any time of day. One reason, Vanderbilt reports, is
> that people are driving to do things they once did at home or down the
> block. It is not just that American households have more cars, he
> writes, it is that they are finding new places to take them. Theyre
> going someplace to eat. Theyre driving to Whole Foods because they
> dont like the produce at their neighborhood supermarket. Theyre going
> out to get coffee. (So much of Starbuckss revenue now comes from
> drive-through lanes that the company will put stores across the street
> from each other, sparing drivers the agony of having to make a left
> turn during rush hour.)

> [more]

Solution is simple - bring back public executions.***
***, quartering and burning at stake. Give prols what
they desire - *** and gore. Maybe cage fighting to death.
It is illusion that we evolve. Give them *** so at least
rest of us is not stuck on the stupid hiway.