Anyone see Dateline piece? Messengers using mt bikes?

Anyone see Dateline piece? Messengers using mt bikes?

Post by Stephen David Gravroc » Tue, 07 Oct 1997 04:00:00


Quote:
> The bikes you saw the criminals in that piece riding were probably all stolen,
> so that is why they all had fron suspension.  Most serious messengers
> use road bikes since they are faster and are not targeted as often for
> theft. Many use fixed gear bikes.  I would suggest a touring bike with
> 32C tires on it.  Then wrap the tubes with old inner tubes which protect
> the paint from chips and make it ugly and unattractive to thieves.

Good advice. In answer to the original question about mountain bikes on
city streets, a better option would be a hybrid with front suspension.
C'dale has had a couple of models out for some time now. If you've got the
bucks, and aren't worried about theft, Trek also makes two models it calls
UAVs. These are hybrids with Manitou forks (the website doesn't say which
one) and suspension seatposts. The UAV-1 is alumium, the UAV-2 is carbon
with better components. I don't know what the MSRP is, but I'd assume it's
quite a bit. Again, theft would be a major problem with these bikes.
Probably the only really good means of securing it would be to braze the
bike to the parking meter.
 
 
 

Anyone see Dateline piece? Messengers using mt bikes?

Post by Alex Rodrigu » Tue, 07 Oct 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

>Last week Dateline ran a piece about the booming bike theft market in
>NYC.
>I was surprised to see that all the messengers use front shock mt
>bikes.  I've never been to NYC so didn't know.
>Does a mt bike really make a better "urban ***" bike than a road
>bike?  How good are they for commuting?
>I currently have a road bike... but mainly commute and am thinking of
>getting a mt bike since roads can be so bad.

The bikes you saw the criminals in that piece riding were probably all stolen,
so that is why they all had fron suspension.  Most serious messengers use
road bikes since they are faster and are not targeted as often for theft.
Many use fixed gear bikes.  I would suggest a touring bike with 32C tires
on it.  Then wrap the tubes with old inner tubes which protect the paint from
chips and make it ugly and unattractive to thieves.  

---------------                                                              
Alex     __O
       _-\<,_
      (_)/ (_)                                                                

 
 
 

Anyone see Dateline piece? Messengers using mt bikes?

Post by Erich Rebenstor » Wed, 08 Oct 1997 04:00:00

John,

If your roads are really that bad, you might consider a mt bike. I
commute on mine (it's the only bike I have right now) and feel much more
secure on it, mainly because I don't have to worry about bumps, small
potholes, small pieces of glass, etc. and I have more manuverabliltiy on
it when drivers cut me off or some other reason for evasive action
(riding singletrack has additional benefits other than just getting
better at riding singletrack).

But some things to consider: If you buy a mt bike sized correctly for
off-road use, it will usually be a size or two samller than your roadie,
and hence less comfortable after some amount of time in the saddle. On
my bike, after more than 20 miles my neck and shoulders start to ache
because of the angle I must hold my head up to see sufficiently far down
the road (not so bad on the trails where I'm more concerned with what's
immediatley in front of me).

If you use your mt bike for both road commutes and true off-roading
(like I do) and can't afford two sets of wheels (like me) then you are
either always switching tires between smoothies and knobbys (which I
don't do) or riding on less than optimal tires for the traveling
surface. My commute is only 7 miles one way, so riding on knobbies at 80
psi is not so bad, plus it allows me to take the "long" way home
sometimes (25 miles, 1/2 on road, 1/2 off road). But using smoothies on
the road can be very fast.

If your mt bike has front suspension, then it probably weighs more than
you roadie, so you'll be pushing more weight around.

If you are a strong rider and/or have lots of hills to go down, then you
will easliy top out the big chainring of a mt bike while riding on the
road, so expect to buy a larger one.

These are the major points that I have come across. My advice is to
stick with your roadie unless your roads look like my trails, or if you
plan on getting into mt biking.

-Erich

Quote:

> Last week Dateline ran a piece about the booming bike theft market in
> NYC.

> I was surprised to see that all the messengers use front shock mt
> bikes.  I've never been to NYC so didn't know.

> Does a mt bike really make a better "urban ***" bike than a road
> bike?  How good are they for commuting?

> I currently have a road bike... but mainly commute and am thinking of
> getting a mt bike since roads can be so bad.


 
 
 

Anyone see Dateline piece? Messengers using mt bikes?

Post by O2 Rid » Thu, 09 Oct 1997 04:00:00

First off let me say, I saw the piece on bike theft and it pissed me off all
 over again.  I hate theives...
Next, I commute 12 miles to work and find advantages to both MTB and road
 bikes.  My MB-5 does a nice job on the city streets but sometimes it's
 necessary to cut across curbs, medians, etc.  The mountain bike is better at
 handling these situations.  My road bike has 700/28's which I run close to max
 for speed but it's also a very forgiving bike when I have to manuever it over
 the rough spots.  I also run a pair of weinmann alloy wheels that only cost
 $75.00, they take commuting and general riding well but if they ever get
 thrashed I won't be out that much.  I do plan to buy another set of wheels for
 smooth long rides with 700/23 or 25 tires, I have to save up though...

 
 
 

Anyone see Dateline piece? Messengers using mt bikes?

Post by Timothy J. L » Fri, 10 Oct 1997 04:00:00

|Next, I commute 12 miles to work and find advantages to both MTB and road
| bikes.  My MB-5 does a nice job on the city streets but sometimes it's
| necessary to cut across curbs, medians, etc.

Why would you need to cut across curbs and medians on a regular basis?

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Anyone see Dateline piece? Messengers using mt bikes?

Post by JMTa » Sat, 11 Oct 1997 04:00:00

If you don't ride on curbs or medians,  you don't know how to commute on a
 bicycle.

If you CAN'T hop on to curbs or medians, you might not live to ride another
 day.

TACO

 
 
 

Anyone see Dateline piece? Messengers using mt bikes?

Post by Jeff Dantzl » Sat, 11 Oct 1997 04:00:00


Quote:

>|Next, I commute 12 miles to work and find advantages to both MTB and road
>| bikes.  My MB-5 does a nice job on the city streets but sometimes it's
>| necessary to cut across curbs, medians, etc.
>Why would you need to cut across curbs and medians on a regular basis?

Why not ? Ever heard of urban *** riding ?

Sure, sure- I advocate being reasonably law-abiding and predictable
when on the streets. However there are plenty of opportunities to
have fun cutting through empty lots, playing on campuses, etc. where
it does not present danger to/of cars.

Also, haven't you ever been "squeezed" into a curb by a car passing you
too close ? Solution = bunny hop onto curb.

Jeff
--

 
 
 

Anyone see Dateline piece? Messengers using mt bikes?

Post by chri » Sun, 12 Oct 1997 04:00:00

SHIT, then try to do that in winter during a full blown westerly snow
storm.  
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cranky chris
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