Info on new "comfort" road bikes

Info on new "comfort" road bikes

Post by Alan Acoc » Tue, 12 Oct 2004 01:54:12


The Trek Pilot this fall has a *** compound added to parts of the carbon
fiber frame to soak up road buzz. Klein and Trek have/will have a road bike
with an elastomer on the rear stem to soak up vibration and small bumps.
Other brands are doing the same thing. These bikes seem to run from $1500
to $4000. What do we know about these? How effective are they or will they
be. Chip seal has taken some of the fun of riding out of my life and
reducing the constant buzz would be a good thing. I don't want to spend
$2000 plus only to be disappointed,however.
Alan Acock
 
 
 

Info on new "comfort" road bikes

Post by Dan Danie » Tue, 12 Oct 2004 02:50:20



Quote:
>The Trek Pilot this fall has a *** compound added to parts of the carbon
>fiber frame to soak up road buzz. Klein and Trek have/will have a road bike
>with an elastomer on the rear stem to soak up vibration and small bumps.
>Other brands are doing the same thing. These bikes seem to run from $1500
>to $4000. What do we know about these? How effective are they or will they
>be. Chip seal has taken some of the fun of riding out of my life and
>reducing the constant buzz would be a good thing. I don't want to spend
>$2000 plus only to be disappointed,however.
>Alan Acock

Try some 28mm tires? Hmmm... $60 and maybe 1/2 pound more versus $2000
and maybe 1/4 pound less.

'Effective' depends on which side of the cash register you are
standing :)

 
 
 

Info on new "comfort" road bikes

Post by PixelPushe » Tue, 12 Oct 2004 02:55:44

FWIW, I just bought an '04 Specialized Roubaix 3 weeks ago.  It has
inserts in the carbon forks, seat stays and seat post.  Most
comfortable bike I tested.  I tried a Trek 2200, Felt F-60 (my second
favorite!), a Cannondale (can't remember what it was), and a Giant OCR
something...  Also checked out the Specialized Sequoia and Allez.  Bang
for the buck (and the ride!), the Roubaix was noticably smoother.  I did
these test rides in the same warehouse parking lot.  It has many
black-top cracks that have been patched.  So there are stretches where
it'll really rattle your teeth at speed.  And to be brutally honest,
the Trek had the "roughest" ride of them all, and for some reason
they've gone with a longer stem than any of the other bikes.  Made me
feel like I was reaching too far.  I knew I could get a shorter stem,
but for that price, a perfect fit is what I expect.  

The Felt F-60 was a very nice ride, and had a better groupset, but it
was just too "aggressive" a stance for me.  I couldn't see myself in
that aggressive a seating position for very long.

Cannondale was nice, but way more than I wanted to spend, and I think
most of that was paying for the name and the best paint job of the
bunch!

Giant, Sequoia and Allez, were all gread bikes too.  But as I tried
each one, I just had a sort-of "ho hum" nice bike thought.  Same for
the Trek.  Now the Roubaix and the Felt....... after the first couple
of pedals, I'm grinning ear to ear.  Those bikes just wanted to "take
off".... not sure how else to explain it.

So far I've put almost 200 miles on the Roubaix and I'm still grinning!
Oh, and I got it for less than the other non-Specialized bikes too!  
Now if I really had the jack, I would have considered the Roubaix Elite
(all ultegra group) or the Comp.  As it is, I'm extremely happy with my
decision.

IMHO, you should try the Roubaix, for comparison if nothing else.  I
actually started out determined I was gonna get a Trek or a Felt.  And
kept coming back to the Roubaix because I couldn't believe I actually
liked the ride better.

Alan Acock Wrote:

Quote:
> The Trek Pilot this fall has a *** compound added to parts of the
> carbon
> fiber frame to soak up road buzz. Klein and Trek have/will have a road
> bike
> with an elastomer on the rear stem to soak up vibration and small
> bumps.
> Other brands are doing the same thing. These bikes seem to run from
> $1500
> to $4000. What do we know about these? How effective are they or will
> they
> be. Chip seal has taken some of the fun of riding out of my life and
> reducing the constant buzz would be a good thing. I don't want to spend
> $2000 plus only to be disappointed,however.
> Alan Acock

--
PixelPusher

 
 
 

Info on new "comfort" road bikes

Post by John Forrest Tomlinso » Tue, 12 Oct 2004 03:55:58



Quote:
>The Trek Pilot this fall has a *** compound added to parts of the carbon
>fiber frame to soak up road buzz.

Interesting idea. I wonder if using some sort of *** or *** and
air cushioning between the bike and the road might work even better.

Just a thought...

JT

****************************
Remove "remove" to reply
Visit http://SportToday.org/
****************************

 
 
 

Info on new "comfort" road bikes

Post by Java Ma » Tue, 12 Oct 2004 03:50:56



Quote:


> >The Trek Pilot this fall has a *** compound added to parts of the carbon
> >fiber frame to soak up road buzz.

> Interesting idea. I wonder if using some sort of *** or *** and
> air cushioning between the bike and the road might work even better.

It'll never catch on.  

;-)

Rick

 
 
 

Info on new "comfort" road bikes

Post by Dan Danie » Tue, 12 Oct 2004 05:03:28

On Sun, 10 Oct 2004 18:50:56 GMT, Java Man

Quote:





>> >The Trek Pilot this fall has a *** compound added to parts of the carbon
>> >fiber frame to soak up road buzz.

>> Interesting idea. I wonder if using some sort of *** or *** and
>> air cushioning between the bike and the road might work even better.

>It'll never catch on.  

>;-)

>Rick

Maybe if they used carbon? That's a cutting edge material.
 
 
 

Info on new "comfort" road bikes

Post by Mike Jacoubowsk » Tue, 12 Oct 2004 12:49:10

Quote:
> The Trek Pilot this fall has a *** compound added to parts of the
> carbon
> fiber frame to soak up road buzz. Klein and Trek have/will have a road
> bike
> with an elastomer on the rear stem to soak up vibration and small bumps.
> Other brands are doing the same thing. These bikes seem to run from $1500
> to $4000. What do we know about these? How effective are they or will they
> be. Chip seal has taken some of the fun of riding out of my life and
> reducing the constant buzz would be a good thing. I don't want to spend
> $2000 plus only to be disappointed,however.
> Alan Acock

I can't speak for the Pilot, as I haven't ridden one yet.  The Klein I have
gotten some good miles on though, and I seriously think that, if they market
it right, it's a breakthrough product.  I did my usual
Tuesday/Thursday-morning ride with one, which includes about 3200 feet of
climbing, some very fast descents, and a variety of pavement, er, styles.  I
was very, very impressed.  I couldn't find anything to complain about...
climbing, both in the saddle and out, gave no indication of anything that
was robbing power or causing the bike to handle differently.  No
"energy-sucking sponge effect", real or imagined.

But my, any sort of bumps and irregularities in the pavement were definitely
reduced in amplitude, in a way that a "compliant" frame, and even larger
tires, seems not to accomplish.  In my opinion, this type of design is
probably better than trying to increase the damping of a given material by
adding compounds to the tubes.

I should try and find my initial test report, which was submitted to TREK
for internal purposes, and post it on our website.

By biggest fear of the elastomer "bumper" technology is that they'll bring
it too far downstream (use it on cheaper models) and kill off its
desirability at the high end.  In my opinion, high-end bikes stand to
benefit the most from this technology, because you can build a
short-wheelbase high-performance bike, with narrow tires, that is absolutely
a smoother bike to ride (without giving up anything more than 4 ounces, near
as I can tell).

--Mike--     Chain Reaction Bicycles
www.ChainReactionBicycles.com

 
 
 

Info on new "comfort" road bikes

Post by Dan Danie » Tue, 12 Oct 2004 13:11:40

On Mon, 11 Oct 2004 03:49:10 GMT, "Mike Jacoubowsky"

Quote:

>> The Trek Pilot this fall has a *** compound added to parts of the
>> carbon
>> fiber frame to soak up road buzz. Klein and Trek have/will have a road
>> bike
>> with an elastomer on the rear stem to soak up vibration and small bumps.
>> Other brands are doing the same thing. These bikes seem to run from $1500
>> to $4000. What do we know about these? How effective are they or will they
>> be. Chip seal has taken some of the fun of riding out of my life and
>> reducing the constant buzz would be a good thing. I don't want to spend
>> $2000 plus only to be disappointed,however.
>> Alan Acock

>I can't speak for the Pilot, as I haven't ridden one yet.  The Klein I have
>gotten some good miles on though, and I seriously think that, if they market
>it right, it's a breakthrough product.  I did my usual
>Tuesday/Thursday-morning ride with one, which includes about 3200 feet of
>climbing, some very fast descents, and a variety of pavement, er, styles.  I
>was very, very impressed.  I couldn't find anything to complain about...
>climbing, both in the saddle and out, gave no indication of anything that
>was robbing power or causing the bike to handle differently.  No
>"energy-sucking sponge effect", real or imagined.

>But my, any sort of bumps and irregularities in the pavement were definitely
>reduced in amplitude, in a way that a "compliant" frame, and even larger
>tires, seems not to accomplish.  In my opinion, this type of design is
>probably better than trying to increase the damping of a given material by
>adding compounds to the tubes.

>I should try and find my initial test report, which was submitted to TREK
>for internal purposes, and post it on our website.

>By biggest fear of the elastomer "bumper" technology is that they'll bring
>it too far downstream (use it on cheaper models) and kill off its
>desirability at the high end.  In my opinion, high-end bikes stand to
>benefit the most from this technology, because you can build a
>short-wheelbase high-performance bike, with narrow tires, that is absolutely
>a smoother bike to ride (without giving up anything more than 4 ounces, near
>as I can tell).

>--Mike--     Chain Reaction Bicycles
>www.ChainReactionBicycles.com

Are those fender mounts I see on the Klein Reve??? And 57mm reach
brakes- 'standard' reach? Can you say how big a tire you can fit on
it, front and rear?

Also, best as I can see, it's the same frame throughout the models,
only different groups?

 
 
 

Info on new "comfort" road bikes

Post by Mike Jacoubowsk » Tue, 12 Oct 2004 14:41:17

Quote:
> Are those fender mounts I see on the Klein Reve??? And 57mm reach
> brakes- 'standard' reach? Can you say how big a tire you can fit on
> it, front and rear?

I haven't tried a really big tire yet, but 28c shouldn't be an issue.  And
yes, 57mm brakes (which is why the Campy version of the bike has Shimano
brakes, since Campy doesn't make a long-reach model).

Quote:
> Also, best as I can see, it's the same frame throughout the models,
> only different groups?

Correct.  Any "Reve" bike has the same frame.

--Mike--     Chain Reaction Bicycles
www.ChainReactionBicycles.com


Quote:
> On Mon, 11 Oct 2004 03:49:10 GMT, "Mike Jacoubowsky"

>>> The Trek Pilot this fall has a *** compound added to parts of the
>>> carbon
>>> fiber frame to soak up road buzz. Klein and Trek have/will have a road
>>> bike
>>> with an elastomer on the rear stem to soak up vibration and small bumps.
>>> Other brands are doing the same thing. These bikes seem to run from
>>> $1500
>>> to $4000. What do we know about these? How effective are they or will
>>> they
>>> be. Chip seal has taken some of the fun of riding out of my life and
>>> reducing the constant buzz would be a good thing. I don't want to spend
>>> $2000 plus only to be disappointed,however.
>>> Alan Acock

>>I can't speak for the Pilot, as I haven't ridden one yet.  The Klein I
>>have
>>gotten some good miles on though, and I seriously think that, if they
>>market
>>it right, it's a breakthrough product.  I did my usual
>>Tuesday/Thursday-morning ride with one, which includes about 3200 feet of
>>climbing, some very fast descents, and a variety of pavement, er, styles.
>>I
>>was very, very impressed.  I couldn't find anything to complain about...
>>climbing, both in the saddle and out, gave no indication of anything that
>>was robbing power or causing the bike to handle differently.  No
>>"energy-sucking sponge effect", real or imagined.

>>But my, any sort of bumps and irregularities in the pavement were
>>definitely
>>reduced in amplitude, in a way that a "compliant" frame, and even larger
>>tires, seems not to accomplish.  In my opinion, this type of design is
>>probably better than trying to increase the damping of a given material by
>>adding compounds to the tubes.

>>I should try and find my initial test report, which was submitted to TREK
>>for internal purposes, and post it on our website.

>>By biggest fear of the elastomer "bumper" technology is that they'll bring
>>it too far downstream (use it on cheaper models) and kill off its
>>desirability at the high end.  In my opinion, high-end bikes stand to
>>benefit the most from this technology, because you can build a
>>short-wheelbase high-performance bike, with narrow tires, that is
>>absolutely
>>a smoother bike to ride (without giving up anything more than 4 ounces,
>>near
>>as I can tell).

>>--Mike--     Chain Reaction Bicycles
>>www.ChainReactionBicycles.com

> Are those fender mounts I see on the Klein Reve??? And 57mm reach
> brakes- 'standard' reach? Can you say how big a tire you can fit on
> it, front and rear?

> Also, best as I can see, it's the same frame throughout the models,
> only different groups?

 
 
 

Info on new "comfort" road bikes

Post by Dan Danie » Tue, 12 Oct 2004 15:15:22

On Mon, 11 Oct 2004 05:41:17 GMT, "Mike Jacoubowsky"

Quote:

>> Are those fender mounts I see on the Klein Reve??? And 57mm reach
>> brakes- 'standard' reach? Can you say how big a tire you can fit on
>> it, front and rear?

>I haven't tried a really big tire yet, but 28c shouldn't be an issue.  And
>yes, 57mm brakes (which is why the Campy version of the bike has Shimano
>brakes, since Campy doesn't make a long-reach model).

Can you confirm fender mounts front and rear? The web site photo isn't
clear.

And would it be available as a frame only?

 
 
 

Info on new "comfort" road bikes

Post by meb » Tue, 12 Oct 2004 15:29:49

John Forrest Tomlinson Wrote:

Quote:


> >The Trek Pilot this fall has a *** compound added to parts of the
> carbon
> >fiber frame to soak up road buzz.

> Interesting idea. I wonder if using some sort of *** or *** and
> air cushioning between the bike and the road might work even better.

> Just a thought...

> JT

> ****************************
> Remove "remove" to reply
> Visit http://SportToday.org/
> ****************************

Pantour uses elastomer technology in the hubs as a suspension:

www.pantourhub.com/products.html

--
meb

 
 
 

Info on new "comfort" road bikes

Post by Mike Jacoubowsk » Tue, 12 Oct 2004 15:40:12

Quote:
> Can you confirm fender mounts front and rear? The web site photo isn't
> clear.

> And would it be available as a frame only?

I'll have to remember at the shop tomorrow.  No frames though, just complete
bikes.

--Mike--     Chain Reaction Bicycles
www.ChainReactionBicycles.com

 
 
 

Info on new "comfort" road bikes

Post by carlfo.. » Tue, 12 Oct 2004 16:33:59

On Mon, 11 Oct 2004 16:29:49 +1000, meb

Quote:

>John Forrest Tomlinson Wrote:


>> >The Trek Pilot this fall has a *** compound added to parts of the
>> carbon
>> >fiber frame to soak up road buzz.

>> Interesting idea. I wonder if using some sort of *** or *** and
>> air cushioning between the bike and the road might work even better.

>> Just a thought...

>> JT

>> ****************************
>> Remove "remove" to reply
>> Visit http://SportToday.org/
>> ****************************

>Pantour uses elastomer technology in the hubs as a suspension:

>www.pantourhub.com/products.html

Dear Meb,

I peeked at that page, but I didn't see any details of
exactly how those Pantour hubs work.

What's going on inside?

Carl Fogel

 
 
 

Info on new "comfort" road bikes

Post by Qui si parla Campagnol » Tue, 12 Oct 2004 23:06:47

pixelpusher-<< FWIW, I just bought an '04 Specialized Roubaix 3 weeks ago.  It
has
inserts in the carbon forks, seat stays and seat post.  Most
comfortable bike I tested. >><BR><BR>

May be but I doubt it's because of tyhose inserts in the carbon sections. They
slid out really easy BTW..may want to glue them in so ya don't loose any.

Too bad the 'fit' was a standover, ride around a parking lot. For the $, you
should have gotten a proper bike fit. Good thing it's working for you tho.

Peter Chisholm
Vecchio's Bicicletteria
1833 Pearl St.
Boulder, CO, 80302
(303)440-3535
http://www.vecchios.com
"Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"

 
 
 

Info on new "comfort" road bikes

Post by Mike Jacoubowsk » Wed, 13 Oct 2004 00:34:38

Quote:
> FWIW, I just bought an '04 Specialized Roubaix 3 weeks ago.  It has
> inserts in the carbon forks, seat stays and seat post.  Most
> comfortable bike I tested.  I tried a Trek 2200, Felt F-60 (my second
> favorite!), a Cannondale (can't remember what it was), and a Giant OCR
> something...  Also checked out the Specialized Sequoia and Allez.  Bang
> for the buck (and the ride!), the Roubaix was noticably smoother.  I did
> these test rides in the same warehouse parking lot.  It has many
> black-top cracks that have been patched.  So there are stretches where
> it'll really rattle your teeth at speed.  And to be brutally honest,
> the Trek had the "roughest" ride of them all, and for some reason
> they've gone with a longer stem than any of the other bikes.  Made me
> feel like I was reaching too far.  I knew I could get a shorter stem,
> but for that price, a perfect fit is what I expect.

Given that the proper fit is probably *the* most important thing as far as
ride comfort goes, I suspect that the Roubaix may have, by sheer chance,
been set up better for you than the others.  It certainly isn't an
indictment of a bike to suggest that it should have come, off the floor,
with a stem representing a "perfect fit."  People don't come in just one
size.  If anything, it's an indication of a shop not willing to set you up
appropriately for a test ride.

Hopefully the shop you purchased the bike from did more than just a
standover test; even if the bike feels comfortable, it's possible it could
be even more so.

--Mike--     Chain Reaction Bicycles
www.ChainReactionBicycles.com