Segway rescues man from being "isolated in traffic" . . .

Segway rescues man from being "isolated in traffic" . . .

Post by Brent Hu » Sun, 15 Dec 2002 00:52:27


Did any of you catch this, on the wired.com story about segways?

"Johnson bought his Segway for his mile-and-a-half commute to work. He
was sick of sitting in traffic, isolated in his car, burning up fossil
fuels." (http://wired.com/news/culture/0,1284,56814,00.html)

Wo-wee . . . a humongous MILE-AND-A-HALF commute.

How about buy a nice pair of walking shoes and pocket the extra $4950.

Walking a mile and a half takes about 22 minutes.

I won't even mention cycling . . .

--Brent "Saves the environment by segwaying 0.25 miles to the gym
whenever he needs a workout" Hugh


+  Missouri Western St College Dept of Music, St. Joseph, MO  +
+            Piano Home Page : http://staff.mwsc.edu/~bhugh   +
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Segway rescues man from being "isolated in traffic" . . .

Post by Matt O'Tool » Sun, 15 Dec 2002 04:21:06


Quote:
> Did any of you catch this, on the wired.com story about segways?

> "Johnson bought his Segway for his mile-and-a-half commute to work. He
> was sick of sitting in traffic, isolated in his car, burning up fossil
> fuels." (http://wired.com/news/culture/0,1284,56814,00.html)

> Wo-wee . . . a humongous MILE-AND-A-HALF commute.

> How about buy a nice pair of walking shoes and pocket the extra $4950.

> Walking a mile and a half takes about 22 minutes.

Yup, about.  I do it almost every day.

For those who claim to be just *so* pressed for time, walking leaves the
hands free for the telephone...

Quote:
> I won't even mention cycling . . .

Three minutes down to Main St., 15 minutes back up...

Quote:
> --Brent "Saves the environment by segwaying 0.25 miles to the gym
> whenever he needs a workout" Hugh

Kinda like those suburban moms in CA that drive a supersized SUV three
blocks to the store 7 times a day, but spend half an hour a day parading
around in their "walking outfit" -- lycra tights, New Balance shoes,
Walkman, Heavy Hands, etc.

Matt O.

 
 
 

Segway rescues man from being "isolated in traffic" . . .

Post by Thomas Reynol » Sun, 15 Dec 2002 06:44:35

Quote:

> Did any of you catch this, on the wired.com story about segways?

> "Johnson bought his Segway for his mile-and-a-half commute to work. He
> was sick of sitting in traffic, isolated in his car, burning up fossil
> fuels." (http://wired.com/news/culture/0,1284,56814,00.html)

> Wo-wee . . . a humongous MILE-AND-A-HALF commute.

> How about buy a nice pair of walking shoes and pocket the extra $4950.

> Walking a mile and a half takes about 22 minutes.

> I won't even mention cycling . . .

> --Brent "Saves the environment by segwaying 0.25 miles to the gym
> whenever he needs a workout" Hugh

You didn't mention the other guy in the article who has a two mile a
day commute.

I work with a guy, a nice fellow but he lives 1.1 miles from work and
he drives his car.  But that's not all.  He works out daily, but he
goes to a gym.  And he drives his car to get there.

Tom

 
 
 

Segway rescues man from being "isolated in traffic" . . .

Post by Steven Scha » Sun, 15 Dec 2002 07:53:57

Quote:

> Did any of you catch this, on the wired.com story about segways?

> "Johnson bought his Segway for his mile-and-a-half commute to work. He
> was sick of sitting in traffic, isolated in his car, burning up fossil
> fuels." (http://wired.com/news/culture/0,1284,56814,00.html)

> Wo-wee . . . a humongous MILE-AND-A-HALF commute.

Maybe Brompton should start an ad campaign, "1/5 the cost
of a Segway and just as fast, just as cool"
 
 
 

Segway rescues man from being "isolated in traffic" . . .

Post by Tom Kea » Sun, 15 Dec 2002 08:01:45



Quote:
> How about buy a nice pair of walking shoes and pocket the extra $4950.

> Walking a mile and a half takes about 22 minutes.

I wonder if he (Johnson) has sidewalks at his avail.  His short
commuting distance leads me to assume he's in a more built-up
urban area, so there *should* be sidewalks.  But sometimes
there aren't any.  Pedestrians are unfairly at the bottom of
the traffic planning food chain.

In suburban developments, it often appears sidewalks are
installed last, if at all.  I guess the lower municipal
taxes gives an appearance of affordability.  Then residents
have to spend 5 yards on a Segway.  Or own a car.

Quote:
> I won't even mention cycling . . .

But we gotta  :-)  So I'll go.  I note to get into a car,
all one needs to do is to sit down.  To get on a Segway,
one simply steps on, as if onto an escalator.  But to
get on a bike, one has to /mount/.  The very first thing
one needs to do to operate a bicycle requires <shudder>
_effort_.  I guess that's partly why Segways have so
much appeal for so many, who ignore or dismiss the idea
of riding a bicycle instead.  I wonder how many folks
are scared off of bikes just by the thought of the effort
to get /on/ one ...

Actually, I found it an effort just getting in or out of
my friend's old RX7 -- it was too "recumbant" for me,
and I even found myself sometimes making that "nnnggg"
grunting noise that we over-40 guys sometimes make when
stooping down.  Hopping on my bike is much easier.

cheers,
        Tom

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Segway rescues man from being "isolated in traffic" . . .

Post by Mike Latondress » Sun, 15 Dec 2002 08:52:56



Quote:

> I wonder if he (Johnson) has sidewalks at his avail.

Wonder what he rode the Segwhatever on if he didn't.
 
 
 

Segway rescues man from being "isolated in traffic" . . .

Post by Dave » Sun, 15 Dec 2002 09:06:30

Nike Shoes Saves Local Woman From Spending Her Life Savings

Wilma Harrison never thought twice about it. Getting to her graduate
classes at the local university 2 miles away used to involve
memorizing the city's commuter bus schedual. Between her part time
waitress job and dropping off and picking up her young son from her
mother's every day, sometimes she made it on the bus, and sometimes
she didn't.

Early in 2002, the Segway Human Transport device was unvailed, and
Wilma knew it was just a matter of time before she knew that this was
the one conveyance that would buy her the freedom she needed to "get
off the bus" forever. Saving up for many months, Wilma decided it was
time to order the Segway. She could get to school on her own schedual
from here on.

But that's where this story takes a bizzarre turn. As it turns out,
Wilma was at a local shopping mall with her son and mother, when by
chance, she found herself standing in front of a Nike concept sporting
goods store.

Also, Wilma saved herself several thousand dollars on this particular
shopping adventure. "I never thought about it," she replied, sporting
spanking new Nike walking and workout shoes. "The sales lady informed
me that with these [shoes], and about half an hour, I could just WALK
to my classes!"

So Wilma and family are now happy with all the money she saved; some
of the remaining savings going towards Christmas presents for her son
and others. "The side benefit is," Wilma went on to add, "... that I
might get some real exercise as a benefit to saving the cash I would
have spent, and I won't have to worry about the thing getting stolen
or odd looks from others."

True story? You decide.

- Dave W.

Quote:



> > Did any of you catch this, on the wired.com story about segways?

> > "Johnson bought his Segway for his mile-and-a-half commute to work. He
> > was sick of sitting in traffic, isolated in his car, burning up fossil
> > fuels." (http://wired.com/news/culture/0,1284,56814,00.html)

> > Wo-wee . . . a humongous MILE-AND-A-HALF commute.

> > How about buy a nice pair of walking shoes and pocket the extra $4950.

> > Walking a mile and a half takes about 22 minutes.

> Yup, about.  I do it almost every day.

> For those who claim to be just *so* pressed for time, walking leaves the
> hands free for the telephone...

> > I won't even mention cycling . . .

> Three minutes down to Main St., 15 minutes back up...

> > --Brent "Saves the environment by segwaying 0.25 miles to the gym
> > whenever he needs a workout" Hugh

> Kinda like those suburban moms in CA that drive a supersized SUV three
> blocks to the store 7 times a day, but spend half an hour a day parading
> around in their "walking outfit" -- lycra tights, New Balance shoes,
> Walkman, Heavy Hands, etc.

> Matt O.

 
 
 

Segway rescues man from being "isolated in traffic" . . .

Post by David L. Johnso » Sun, 15 Dec 2002 10:17:13

Quote:

> I wonder if he (Johnson) has sidewalks at his avail.  His short
> commuting distance leads me to assume he's in a more built-up urban
> area, so there *should* be sidewalks.  But sometimes there aren't any.
> Pedestrians are unfairly at the bottom of the traffic planning food
> chain.

> In suburban developments, it often appears sidewalks are installed last,
> if at all.  I guess the lower municipal taxes gives an appearance of
> affordability.  Then residents have to spend 5 yards on a Segway.  Or
> own a car.

What, just because there is no sidewalk, walking is forbidden?

--

David L. Johnson

   __o   | And though I have the gift of prophecy, and understand all
 _`\(,_  | mysteries,  and all knowledge; and though I have all faith, so
(_)/ (_) | that I could remove mountains, and have not charity, I am
           nothing. [1 Corinth. 13:2]

 
 
 

Segway rescues man from being "isolated in traffic" . . .

Post by Mike Latondress » Sun, 15 Dec 2002 14:05:38



Quote:

>> I wonder if he (Johnson) has sidewalks at his avail.  His short
>> commuting distance leads me to assume he's in a more built-up
>> urban area, so there *should* be sidewalks.  But sometimes there
>> aren't any. Pedestrians are unfairly at the bottom of the traffic
>> planning food chain.

>> In suburban developments, it often appears sidewalks are
>> installed last, if at all.  I guess the lower municipal taxes
>> gives an appearance of affordability.  Then residents have to
>> spend 5 yards on a Segway.  Or own a car.

> What, just because there is no sidewalk, walking is forbidden?

No David, Segway riding is forbidden because unless they pass that law,
you know that law.
 
 
 

Segway rescues man from being "isolated in traffic" . . .

Post by Dav » Sun, 15 Dec 2002 14:10:02

Quote:



> > I wonder if he (Johnson) has sidewalks at his avail.

> Wonder what he rode the Segwhatever on if he didn't.

"When you're driving, you're always calling everyone else on the road
an ***," Johnson said. "The Segway is not that way. People are
smiling and wanting to chat. It's totally different. It's nice."

The ideal above statement would be to replace the word Segway with
bike. Is there any bigger waste of money (other than an SUV) than to
spend it on that contraption. I get the same experience when commuting
to work on my $700.00 commuter bike.

David
"The commuter freak" as called by my fellow work brethren

 
 
 

Segway rescues man from being "isolated in traffic" . . .

Post by Tom Kea » Sun, 15 Dec 2002 16:18:10



Quote:


>> I wonder if he (Johnson) has sidewalks at his avail.

> Wonder what he rode the Segwhatever on if he didn't.

I'd guess the gutter, where the Traffic Inferiority Complex
POBs would go.

An amphibious/all-terrain version Segway might be useful
along some of those roads in Richmond BC -- the roads
with the deep ditches instead of decent footpaths on
each side.  Nighttime pedestrians seem to get mowed
down by cars on almost a regular basis, on those roads.

I wonder how useful a Segway would be in some ofthe least
pedestrian-friendly areas of Surrey.  I also wonder how
long it'll take to be stolen  :-)

cheers,
        Tom

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Segway rescues man from being "isolated in traffic" . . .

Post by Mike Kruge » Mon, 16 Dec 2002 13:30:06


Quote:

> Maybe Brompton should start an ad campaign, "1/5 the cost
> of a Segway and just as fast, just as cool"

And Brompton can point out the advantage of their huge 16 inch wheels ;)
 
 
 

Segway rescues man from being "isolated in traffic" . . .

Post by Zoot Kat » Mon, 16 Dec 2002 14:13:07


Quote:



>> Maybe Brompton should start an ad campaign, "1/5 the cost
>> of a Segway and just as fast, just as cool"

>And Brompton can point out the advantage of their huge 16 inch wheels ;)

IIRC, for a while here in Vancouver 16" wheels were the limit for a
"sidewalk bike". Having wheels over that size meant you were obliged to
ride on the street. I think it was a by-law but I can no longer find it.
Couriers were taking advantage of the loophole by riding BMX bikes and
more or less transitioning between street and sidewalk at will.

I got a chuckle out of the guy saying people couldn't wait to chat. For
$150 I had that experience on a Razor folding scooter just before the
boom. Of course you still don't see many 50 year old kids riding them.
--
zk

 
 
 

Segway rescues man from being "isolated in traffic" . . .

Post by Steven Scha » Tue, 17 Dec 2002 13:44:48

Quote:



> > Maybe Brompton should start an ad campaign, "1/5 the cost
> > of a Segway and just as fast, just as cool"

> And Brompton can point out the advantage of their huge 16 inch wheels ;)

Clearly the people buying the Segway are not doing so because
they really need it for transportation; they are buying it
because they have to have the latest toy. They can have a Brompton
for 1/5 the cost, it's much more practical, and, like a Segway,
it can be stored easily inside at work.

Segway is very clever how they have gone around the country
pressuring cities to allow the Segway on sidewalks where
a lot of people perceive that they will be safe. But walking
(about 2-3mph) and Segwaying (12 mph) are two very different
things. After the first couple of fatalities from a car
backing out of driveway over a Segway, and after a few
pedestrian-Segway collisions and the resulting lawsuits
against the cities, things will change.

 
 
 

Segway rescues man from being "isolated in traffic" . . .

Post by Ryan Cousinea » Tue, 17 Dec 2002 16:26:02



Quote:




> > > Maybe Brompton should start an ad campaign, "1/5 the cost
> > > of a Segway and just as fast, just as cool"

> > And Brompton can point out the advantage of their huge 16 inch wheels ;)

> Clearly the people buying the Segway are not doing so because
> they really need it for transportation; they are buying it
> because they have to have the latest toy. They can have a Brompton
> for 1/5 the cost, it's much more practical, and, like a Segway,
> it can be stored easily inside at work.

> Segway is very clever how they have gone around the country
> pressuring cities to allow the Segway on sidewalks where
> a lot of people perceive that they will be safe. But walking
> (about 2-3mph) and Segwaying (12 mph) are two very different
> things. After the first couple of fatalities from a car
> backing out of driveway over a Segway, and after a few
> pedestrian-Segway collisions and the resulting lawsuits
> against the cities, things will change.

12 mph is a running speed, not a cycling speed. If I could only do 12
mph on my bike, I'd ride on the sidewalk too.

Well, maybe not. But the impact on the sidewalk of a Segway at full
speed is roughly that of a heavy person running. We don't tell fast fat
people to use the streets, do we?

Besides, from a purely self-interested point of view, keeping Segways on
the sidewalks keeps them out of the way of cyclists. That's good, right?

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