Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by frkry.. » Thu, 18 Apr 2013 23:21:49


Quote:

> you said some of th eusual stuff suggesting that Jay's problem may (or

> must) be due to his incompetence.

That's either lack of reading comprehension, or an outright lie.  

Quote:
> I called you on it.  Then you

> *defended*  the need to work on becoming competent!  Jeez Louise, man!

Yes, with you, I do have to defend becoming competent.  You've made it plain that learning from anything but your own guesses and whims (which _you_ present as super-perceptive observation) is a target for your mockery.  

You've also mocked riding _without_ getting into crashes.  My son outgrew that attitude by about age 16!  Sorry, Dan, you're a case of arrested development - a ***age mind in an *** body.

- Frank Krygowski

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by SMS » Fri, 19 Apr 2013 04:15:54


Quote:
> I'm still wondering how Frank has never had a car pull out in front of
> him from a side road.  He makes it sound like he's never even needed to
> dodge one, or yell so that they stop.

It would be possible for a bicyclist to ride in such a way that this is
the case. If you ride very slowly and in a way that if any vehicle were
to pull out you could anticipate it and slow down even more, then it
could work. That's also why he's also never felt the need for a helmet
or for good lighting.

I see people riding like that every day. It's not a pleasant way to ride
but to be a vehicular cyclist and take the right of way when its yours
requires a certain level of riding skill and equipment and confidence
that not everyone has.

I recall when I first started using good lighting. The difference in
vehicle behavior was absolutely incredible. Riding at night became much
more enjoyable as well as much faster when vehicles treat you more as
motor vehicle than a toy bicycle.

A few weeks ago my sister-in-law came over so I could teach her how to
fix a flat tire on her 9 year old daughter's bike (and her own).
Afterward we went for a ride and it was the first time the 9 year old
had ridden on a street with cars versus a bicycle trail (they have an 8
mile trail that backs up to their house and that's mostly where they'd
ridden). The 9 year old did fine. The mother was way over cautious and
would have ridden in a way that no vehicle ever had to yield to us but I
wouldn't let her do that and since she had no idea of the route, or even
where we were, she had to keep up (I made judicious use of "secret
passageways" that connect various neighborhoods for pedestrians and
bicycles but not for cars).

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by Dan » Fri, 19 Apr 2013 04:17:40


Quote:

> > you said some of th eusual stuff suggesting that Jay's problem may (or

> > must) be due to his incompetence.

> That's either lack of reading comprehension, or an outright lie.


Quote:

> > My commute this morning, however, is proof that conspicuity is no
> > guaranty of anything.  I had so many conflicts, I thought I was in one
> > of those old driver's ed simulator movies.  I was wearing a ghastly
> > green PI jacket and had my eye-popping 700 lumen flasher blazing away,
> > yet people turned in front of me, pulled out in to me, etc., etc.  I
> > had to check my body to make sure I hadn't turned invisible.

> What was your lane position like?
> > I called you on it. ?Then you

> > *defended* ?the need to work on becoming competent! ?Jeez Louise, man!

> Yes, with you, I do have to defend becoming competent. ?You've made it plain that learning from anything but your own guesses and whims (which _you_ present as super-perceptive observation) is a target for your mockery.

> You've also mocked riding _without_ getting into crashes. ?My son outgrew that attitude by about age 16! ?Sorry, Dan, you're a case of arrested development - a ***age mind in an *** body.

What makes you so sure about my body?

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by Jay Beatti » Fri, 19 Apr 2013 05:00:51


Quote:

> > I'm still wondering how Frank has never had a car pull out in front of

> > him from a side road. ?He makes it sound like he's never even needed to

> > dodge one, or yell so that they stop.

> That's not what I said. ?I have yelled at car drivers and gotten them to stop. ?About a week ago, I yelled at a ***ager backing rapidly out his driveway from my left. ?(This was at the other end of the short village bike-ped path, and his house is the last on the portion of street that's a dead end except for bikes, so I suppose he feels there's no need to check.)

> Still, I've never come within ten feet of a car-bike collision from someone pulling out in front of me from a stop sign or driveway. ?And Jay was originally talking about motorists turning right from a stop sign, which should be even less of a problem, since they'd be turning away from my travel.

> > > So you "take the lane" if a car approaches a stop sign on cross street

> > > to your right?

> > I do, and if I have enough time to check what's behind me and there's

> > nothing, I move out even further. ?I have had to move out to the next

> > lane and go around a car that pulled out in front of me.

> I do as well, and I still remember the day (years ago) when I realized it was an automatic reaction on my part - that I do it as a matter of habit or reflex. ?And like many reflexes, I think it improves with conscious practice.

http://SportToday.org/; This guy is getting a
left hook where I often get traffic entering from the right.  You
can't see it very well, but there are a number of streets that enter
from the right up steep hills -- and because of the angle of the road,
oncoming traffic, etc., I can be hard to see -- and people tend to pop
over the lip in to the bike lane without stopping so their cars, so
there is that happy sh** as well. More common condition at/near same
spot: http://SportToday.org/;  It's a main
arterial in to downtown and busy during the morning rush hour.

BTW, I also get a lot of left hooking just before this area because I
stay in the bike lane.  It is the predictable failure to yield issues
that arise when motorists don't understand that the bike lane is
"through traffic."  I can avoid those, but they often occur right when
a bus is pulling to the right curb and cars stack up behind it -- so
this giant clot forms, a car cuts in front of me, and I can't go
around on the left.  I'm totally boxed and have to slam on the brakes
and sometimes have to  make a hard right.
Today, I avoided all of this by doing  >1,000' of  gratuitous climbing
through the hills.  One road was blocked half way down due to
construction, and the "detour" was to climb back up.  It would have
been helpful if they posted a sign at the top.

-- Jay Beattie.

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by frkry.. » Fri, 19 Apr 2013 05:16:31

Quote:


> > I'm still wondering how Frank has never had a car pull out in front of

> > him from a side road.  He makes it sound like he's never even needed to

> > dodge one, or yell so that they stop.

> It would be possible for a bicyclist to ride in such a way that this is

> the case. If you ride very slowly and in a way that if any vehicle were

> to pull out you could anticipate it and slow down even more, then it

> could work. That's also why he's also never felt the need for a helmet

> or for good lighting.

I got back from a nice ride about an hour ago.  Regarding the "if you ride slow enough" nonsense, I just checked my maximum speed reading still on my cyclometer: 37.5 mph.  So stuff the "slow enough" comment somewhere dark and moist, Stephen.

Quote:
> I see people riding like that every day. It's not a pleasant way to ride

> but to be a vehicular cyclist and take the right of way when its yours

> requires a certain level of riding skill and equipment and confidence

> that not everyone has.

I agree that not everyone has the skill and confidence.  But it's quite easy to learn.  Can you be as brave as this lady?
http://cyclingsavvy.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/Diana.png
That's taken from the article describing how she learned the necessary skill and confidence, at http://cyclingsavvy.org/2011/05/i-am-no-road-warrior/

Problem is, most Americans don't put nearly enough effort into learning things; instead, they try to solve problems by finding stuff to buy.  Cars passing too close because you're riding in the gutter?  Buy a flippy flag!  Oncoming motorists don't notice you in the gutter?  Buy a strobe light!  You keep crashing your bike?  Buy a helmet!

Meanwhile, those of us who stay out of the gutter and ride competently just don't have those problems.  Go figure.

- Frank Krygowski

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by AMuz » Fri, 19 Apr 2013 05:24:44


Quote:

> 19:25:45 -0700 (PDT) the perfect time to write:




>>>>> Even when taking the entire lane, cars may not see you due to visual
>>>>> clutter.

>>>> For a certain value of "may." If it were likely that a motorist didn't
>>>> see me taking the lane due to visual clutter, I'd have been run over
>>>> from behind long before now.

>>> For certain values of "likely".

>>> I recall a couple who were riding the local mountain. He was in the
>>> middle of the lane, while she was to his left (closest to the edge of
>>> the road). Quite visible in the middle of the day.

>>> A female driver who was allegedly focused on her visual clutter (mobile
>>> phone I think), hit him from behind, square in the middle of the bumper.
>>>  He went over the car backwards and landed on the road behind - broken
>>> but not dead. His partner didn't get hit at all.

>> Yes, that sometimes (rarely) happens.  There have also been incidents
>> of totally distracted drivers mowing down cyclists who were riding way
>> over on highway shoulders.  Nothing is 100% perfect.  I just keep in
>> mind that such crashes are very, very rare.

> And of course, the ONLY solution to such atrocious driving is the
> removal of such drivers from the road.
> Strangely, regulatory authorities don't seem to be able to recognise
> that some people just cannot be trusted to operate dangerous machinery
> in a public place, even when they've proved beyond all reasonable
> doubt that it is so, and that the original grant of the license was an
> error, which the authorities have a clear duty to rectify.

As a regular reader of newspapers, the notably horrific
crashes are often by a guy with suspended/revoked license
after a half dozen drunk driving convictions or some such.

Addled texters with earphones are no better.

The implication that licensing is an answer is refuted by
the evidence on both sides, viz., properly licensed idiots
and unlicensed habitual offender idiots.

Not that all drivers are out to kill cyclists but licensing
hardly separates the various groups.

--
Andrew Muzi
  <www.yellowjersey.org/>
  Open every day since 1 April, 1971

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by frkry.. » Fri, 19 Apr 2013 05:26:43

Quote:

> http://SportToday.org/; This guy is getting a

> left hook where I often get traffic entering from the right.  

Sounds like a more leftward position would help both problems.  But then Oregon's got that mandatory bike lane law...

Quote:
> More common condition at/near same

> spot: http://SportToday.org/;  

For situations like that, I'd be tempted to use the following accessory:  A venting schrader valve cap, with a vent hole plus an internal pin.  You'd remove one of the truck's valve caps,***on the venting valve cap, and ride off as his tire quickly went flat.

I think this could work in a place with as many cyclists as Portland.  Those UPS guys have tight schedules.  They'd soon figure out that it's better to park elsewhere.

- Frank Krygowski

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by Dan » Fri, 19 Apr 2013 06:31:56


Quote:

> >http://SportToday.org/

> > left hook where I often get traffic entering from the right.

> Sounds like a more leftward position would help both problems. ?But then Oregon's got that mandatory bike lane law...

But then almost everywhere has that "as far right as practicable
law".  Oregon's mandatory bike lane law amply exempts when "not
practicable".

And (especially in a place like Portland), motorists may expect to see
a bicyclist in a bike lane (and bike lanes should be quite noticeable,
seeing as drivers are supposed to pay attention to paint stripes
they're driving over).

Quote:
> > More common condition at/near same

> > spot:http://SportToday.org/

> For situations like that, I'd be tempted to use the following accessory: ?A venting schrader valve cap, with a vent hole plus an internal pin. ?You'd remove one of the truck's valve caps,***on the venting valve cap, and ride off as his tire quickly went flat.

> I think this could work in a place with as many cyclists as Portland. ?Those UPS guys have tight schedules. ?They'd soon figure out that it's better to park elsewhere.

Motor vehicle sabotage?  Man, that sounds really, *really* illegal!
And potentially very dangerous for innocent others.
 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by sms » Fri, 19 Apr 2013 07:03:59


Quote:
> Motor vehicle sabotage?  Man, that sounds really, *really* illegal!
> And potentially very dangerous for innocent others.

I knew someone that used to carry around a valve core removal tool. If
he saw someone driving crazy he would follow them until they stopped and
then he would remove all four of the valve cores and let the tires go
flat and throw the valve cores away. No permanent damage but a huge hassle.

He also did other things, based on the situation. One day he saw a
convertible racing through the parking lot at Stanford Shopping Center,
threatening pedestrians. After the guy parked, and left the top down, he
walked around the parking lot picking up any trash he could find and he
dumped it into the convertible.

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by Dan » Fri, 19 Apr 2013 07:05:13


Quote:

> 13:19:58 -0700 (PDT) the perfect time to write:



> >> > ... If it were likely that a motorist didn't
> >> > see me taking the lane due to visual clutter, I'd have been run over
> >> > from behind long before now.

> >> I'm thinking of traffic entering from the right. ?Taking the lane (or
> >> more of the lane) does help, but when you get cloud cover and flat
> >> lighting, objects can get lost in a background, and a right turning
> >> motorists who looks quickly to the left ?can miss a drab colored
> >> cyclist.

> >That's not been a problem for me when on my bicycle. ?I actually can't
> >remember a single such incident - which doesn't prove that it never
> >happened or can't happen; just that it doesn't amount to much.

> >One reason it might not amount to much could be the typically lower
> >speed of a bicycle. ?The motorist making a right turn would be tending
> >to move away from you, so closing speed would be lower. ?Besides, a
> >bike doesn't need a whole lot of lane to avoid contact.

> >I _do_ worry about that when on my motorcycle, and to a certain extent
> >when in my car. ?I worry less on a bicycle, although I generally shift
> >to the left part of the lane (on either two wheeler) if someone is in
> >a position to pull out like that.

> I refine that slightly, in that my move to the left is timed to
> coincide with the driver looking in my direction, so that the lateral
> movement attracts their attention.

It is, indeed, quite helpful if the driver is *ever* looking in my
direction.

Quote:
> That's a technique taught to police advanced motorcyclists, but it can
> be used to good effect by the rider of any two wheeler.

I refine it further.  Since you have to check or be aware that it's
clear to move left, once I've done that (positioned for maneuvering as
may be necessary), I am checking the *next* lane, too - even if it's
for oncoming traffic.  I am also dynamically assessing what the
"threat" is apt to do, and have probably already scoped out a host of
options.

If they are oblivious to your presence and pulling out in front of you
to turn right, bonus for slapping the driver's side window as you blow
past them (carries some risk, though - as since they're obviously at
least distracted and/or oblivious and quite possibly inherently
scatterbrained, it's always possible that they suddenly realize they
meant to turn left and then try to throw a U-turn or something)... and
of course none of that works anyway if you're "typically lower speed".

- Show quoted text -

Quote:

> >> My commute this morning, however, is proof that conspicuity is no
> >> guaranty of anything. ?I had so many conflicts, I thought I was in one
> >> of those old driver's ed simulator movies. ?I was wearing a ghastly
> >> green PI jacket and had my eye-popping 700 lumen flasher blazing away,
> >> yet people turned in front of me, pulled out in to me, etc., etc. ?I
> >> had to check my body to make sure I hadn't turned invisible.

> >What was your lane position like? ?Or were you in a bike lane?

> >> And last gripe, some ass clown in a Mini about ran me down last
> >> night. ?This is more confirmation that Mini drivers are the absolute
> >> worst -- notwithstanding the Bohemian cred of the car. ?I think the
> >> drivers believe they are so small that they can pass bicyclists under
> >> any circumstances -- like a bicyclist passing a bicyclist. ?Anytime I
> >> see one, I now take ALL the lanes -- my SMS approved side flags drop
> >> in to place, ten flashers activate and my Planet Bike MP3 calliope
> >> starts blaring "I Love a Parade."

> >Too bad sirens are illegal, no?

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by Dan » Fri, 19 Apr 2013 07:29:18


Quote:

> >http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yw2WjH0v5sw? This guy is getting a
> > left hook where I often get traffic entering from the right.

> Sounds like a more leftward position would help both problems. ?But then Oregon's got that mandatory bike lane law...

That one looks to me more like the driver had probably - certainly
*should* have - seen the bicyclist, but assumed your "typically lower
speed".

<snip>

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by Dan » Fri, 19 Apr 2013 08:18:22


Quote:


> > >http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yw2WjH0v5sw?This guy is getting a
> > > left hook where I often get traffic entering from the right.

> > Sounds like a more leftward position would help both problems. ?But then Oregon's got that mandatory bike lane law...

> That one looks to me more like the driver had probably - certainly
> *should* have - seen the bicyclist, but assumed your "typically lower
> speed".

> <snip>

"The driver was using the western-most northbound lane as a left turn
lane. That is, the driver was traveling southbound in a northbound
lane."
 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by frkry.. » Fri, 19 Apr 2013 08:49:02

Quote:



> > >http://SportToday.org/

> > > left hook where I often get traffic entering from the right.

> > Sounds like a more leftward position would help both problems. ?But then Oregon's got that mandatory bike lane law...

> But then almost everywhere has that "as far right as practicable

> law".  Oregon's mandatory bike lane law amply exempts when "not

> practicable".

> And (especially in a place like Portland), motorists may expect to see

> a bicyclist in a bike lane (and bike lanes should be quite noticeable,

> seeing as drivers are supposed to pay attention to paint stripes

> they're driving over).

> > > More common condition at/near same

> > > spot:http://SportToday.org/

> > For situations like that, I'd be tempted to use the following accessory: ?A venting schrader valve cap, with a vent hole plus an internal pin. ?You'd remove one of the truck's valve caps,***on the venting valve cap, and ride off as his tire quickly went flat.

> > I think this could work in a place with as many cyclists as Portland. ?Those UPS guys have tight schedules. ?They'd soon figure out that it's better to park elsewhere.

> Motor vehicle sabotage?  Man, that sounds really, *really* illegal!

Probably vandalism in the eyes of the law.  Which is why I said I'd be tempted, but didn't say I would actually do it.  It's not a recommendation; it's more of a daydream.

Quote:

> And potentially very dangerous for innocent others.

Not very dangerous, I think.  If a truck driver came out and found a flat tire, he'd not go careening off in spite of it.  He'd be sure it got fixed.

Our car got a flat while on vacation a few weeks ago.  All survived.

- Frank Krygowski

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by frkry.. » Fri, 19 Apr 2013 08:51:04

Quote:


> > Motor vehicle sabotage?  Man, that sounds really, *really* illegal!

> > And potentially very dangerous for innocent others.

> I knew someone that used to carry around a valve core removal tool. If

> he saw someone driving crazy he would follow them until they stopped and

> then he would remove all four of the valve cores and let the tires go

> flat and throw the valve cores away. No permanent damage but a huge hassle.

> He also did other things, based on the situation. One day he saw a

> convertible racing through the parking lot at Stanford Shopping Center,

> threatening pedestrians. After the guy parked, and left the top down, he

> walked around the parking lot picking up any trash he could find and he

> dumped it into the convertible.

IIRC, Edgar Allen Poe pointed out that it's not enough to get revenge.  The recipient has to know why it's happening.  Maybe carry some Post-It notes?

- Frank Krygowski

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by Dan » Sat, 20 Apr 2013 00:53:02


Quote:



> > > >http://SportToday.org/

> > > > left hook where I often get traffic entering from the right.

> > > Sounds like a more leftward position would help both problems. ?But then Oregon's got that mandatory bike lane law...

> > But then almost everywhere has that "as far right as practicable

> > law". ?Oregon's mandatory bike lane law amply exempts when "not

> > practicable".

> > And (especially in a place like Portland), motorists may expect to see

> > a bicyclist in a bike lane (and bike lanes should be quite noticeable,

> > seeing as drivers are supposed to pay attention to paint stripes

> > they're driving over).

> > > > More common condition at/near same

> > > > spot:http://SportToday.org/

> > > For situations like that, I'd be tempted to use the following accessory: ?A venting schrader valve cap, with a vent hole plus an internal pin. ?You'd remove one of the truck's valve caps,***on the venting valve cap, and ride off as his tire quickly went flat.

> > > I think this could work in a place with as many cyclists as Portland. ?Those UPS guys have tight schedules. ?They'd soon figure out that it's better to park elsewhere.

> > Motor vehicle sabotage? ?Man, that sounds really, *really* illegal!

> Probably vandalism in the eyes of the law.

Intentional sabotage pure and simple.

Quote:
> ?Which is why I said I'd be tempted, but didn't say I would actually do it. ?It's not a recommendation; it's more of a daydream.

Well, nice of you to diagram the technical specifications and use
instructions of your proposed device for the more earnest saboteurs
out there.

Quote:

> > And potentially very dangerous for innocent others.

> Not very dangerous, I think. ?If a truck driver came out and found a flat tire, he'd not go careening off in spite of it. ?He'd be sure it got fixed.

You said you'd "ride off as his tire quickly went flat".  Let's *hope*
that (once sabotaged) it actually does go completely flat... disables
the vehicle from (hazardous) operation... and that the driver notices
before pulling onto the road.

And even if it works, what have you accomplished?  Prolonged the
initial problem for more people?  No chance of anybody getting hurt
because of that situation, eh?

Quote:
> Our car got a flat while on vacation a few weeks ago. ?All survived.

Well then, I guess that's evidence that it's perfectly safe.  Sabotage
away.