Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by datakol » Thu, 18 Apr 2013 09:00:56


ahno really JB....you nride in the middle ? This isnot logical.

The original Mini was easy driving just absolutley flatout rain snow earthquakes migrating crabs sand drifts West Side Highway.. I would guess...I dunno if the dealer would let me testdrive....BM's Mini does it.

Butbutbut on the hole, the Mini are watching trying to drive good.

Mini in Portland are prob quicker than what byou expect.

You should test one !!!  trade in the Suby....I'll betto you can drive thru rush hour traffic goin 90 with a set o sticky ***.

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by Jame » Thu, 18 Apr 2013 09:08:59


Quote:

>> Even when taking the entire lane, cars may not see you due to visual
>> clutter.

> For a certain value of "may." If it were likely that a motorist didn't
> see me taking the lane due to visual clutter, I'd have been run over
> from behind long before now.

For certain values of "likely".

I recall a couple who were riding the local mountain.  He was in the
middle of the lane, while she was to his left (closest to the edge of
the road).  Quite visible in the middle of the day.

A female driver who was allegedly focused on her visual clutter (mobile
phone I think), hit him from behind, square in the middle of the bumper.
  He went over the car backwards and landed on the road behind - broken
but not dead.  His partner didn't get hit at all.

--
JS.

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by Frank Krygowsk » Thu, 18 Apr 2013 11:20:58


Quote:


> >> On Mon, 15 Apr 2013 10:48:54 -0700 (PDT), Jay Beattie


> >>> Even more O.T., my son was telling me that the approved hand position
> >>> on auto steering wheels is no longer ten-and-two, but somewhere near
> >>> nine and three (or even below, depending on the instructor) -- so when
> >>> the air bag deploys, your thumbs are not blown off. ?Of course, it
> >>> takes away your control of the car,

> >> Ten and two was for cars built before power steering became common --
> >> it made it easier to hand-over-hand the wheel around and around.

> >> Nine and three is for greater control -- you have your hands where
> >> they have the most leverage, and if you are bumped, the jerk
> >> transmitted to the wheel through one hand is opposed by the jerk
> >> transmitted to the wheel by the other hand, so you don't have swerving
> >> off in an unplanned direction added to your other troubles.

> >> If your driving instructor thinks it has anything to do with air bags,
> >> get another instructor. ? This one is making up stuff to fill in gaps
> >> in an explanation he didn't understand.

> > Actually, the 9 and 3 advice is the very latest thing, and it is
> > apparently based on fear of airbags injuring hands& ?arms, or worse.
> > Here's a link:
> >http://www.nbcnews.com/business/get-times-youre-driving-all-wrong-518710

> > Of course, I don't see that anyone's tallied the number of such hand
> > and arm injuries, to determine how likely they are. ?It seems to be
> > more of the usual mentality: ?"This _could_ happen, so you must
> > NEVER..."

> > I look at this as another unintended consequence of ever-increasing
> > standards for safety devices. ?"An explosive device in your steering
> > wheel that will propel plastic parts toward you at 200 mph? ?Sure!
> > What could go wrong?"

> > And before the airbag fans jump all over me: Yes, they've certainly
> > saved lives. ?But they've saved far fewer lives than projected, and
> > they may have saved most of those by simply scaring people into
> > actually wearing seat belts. ?When your car's visor has a warning that
> > your airbag can take off your head if you don't wear your seatbelt, it
> > tends to make you buckle up.

> I've thought for a while now that those who chose a car because it has
> all the safety features must be preparing to crash.

> I prefer to prepare to not crash, and drive what ever I feel I can
> control well enough to avoid an accident.

Exactly.  And learn to control it, too.  I took both my kids into
slippery parking lots to try a little skidding, when teaching them to
drive.

But I think the biggest part of accident avoidance control is to
control the situation so as to minimize crash risk.  For example, I
refuse to ride near other cyclists, or drive near other motorists, who
exhibit squirrelly behavior.  I do look ahead at traffic situations to
see what might develop, playing several moves ahead as in a chess
game.

I much prefer to avoid trouble in the first place, rather than to rely
on an airbag or helmet to save my life once I'm really in trouble.

- Frank Krygowski

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by Frank Krygowsk » Thu, 18 Apr 2013 11:25:45


Quote:


> >> Even when taking the entire lane, cars may not see you due to visual
> >> clutter.

> > For a certain value of "may." If it were likely that a motorist didn't
> > see me taking the lane due to visual clutter, I'd have been run over
> > from behind long before now.

> For certain values of "likely".

> I recall a couple who were riding the local mountain. ?He was in the
> middle of the lane, while she was to his left (closest to the edge of
> the road). ?Quite visible in the middle of the day.

> A female driver who was allegedly focused on her visual clutter (mobile
> phone I think), hit him from behind, square in the middle of the bumper.
> ? He went over the car backwards and landed on the road behind - broken
> but not dead. ?His partner didn't get hit at all.

Yes, that sometimes (rarely) happens.  There have also been incidents
of totally distracted drivers mowing down cyclists who were riding way
over on highway shoulders.  Nothing is 100% perfect.  I just keep in
mind that such crashes are very, very rare.

- Frank Krygowski

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by Joy Beeso » Thu, 18 Apr 2013 11:16:18

On Tue, 16 Apr 2013 08:09:15 -0700 (PDT), Frank Krygowski

Quote:

> Actually, the 9 and 3 advice is the very latest thing, and it is
> apparently based on fear of airbags injuring hands & arms, or worse.
> Here's a link:
> http://www.nbcnews.com/business/get-times-youre-driving-all-wrong-518710

Saying it's new doesn't make it new.  Air bags hadn't been invented
when I was taught to hold the wheel at nine and three.  

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://roughsewing.home.comcast.net/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by Dan » Thu, 18 Apr 2013 12:29:46


Quote:



> > >> Even when taking the entire lane, cars may not see you due to visual
> > >> clutter.

> > > For a certain value of "may." If it were likely that a motorist didn't
> > > see me taking the lane due to visual clutter, I'd have been run over
> > > from behind long before now.

> > For certain values of "likely".

> > I recall a couple who were riding the local mountain.  He was in the
> > middle of the lane, while she was to his left (closest to the edge of
> > the road).  Quite visible in the middle of the day.

> > A female driver who was allegedly focused on her visual clutter (mobile
> > phone I think), hit him from behind, square in the middle of the bumper.
> >   He went over the car backwards and landed on the road behind - broken
> > but not dead.  His partner didn't get hit at all.

> Yes, that sometimes (rarely) happens.  There have also been incidents
> of totally distracted drivers mowing down cyclists who were riding way
> over on highway shoulders.  Nothing is 100% perfect.  I just keep in
> mind that such crashes are very, very rare.

Maybe I just have an animal brain or something, but I don't seem to
need to "keep [such things] in mind"; don't need to "convince"
myself..  I just know it in my bones; the way things are.

A big part of my dynamic interaction with other traffic is getting a
sense of what is going on in the head of people.  Some base
assumptions can be made (expectations), but it's wildy variable from
there.  Fortunately clues are plentiful to the perceptive observer.

If there is anything to "keep in mind", it is the opposite of the
considered probability - that being that anything is possible (could
happen) - so as not to be taken completely by surprise when it does.

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by Dan » Thu, 18 Apr 2013 12:30:38


Quote:




> > > > > ... If it were likely that a motorist didn't
> > > > > see me taking the lane due to visual clutter, I'd have been run over
> > > > > from behind long before now.

> > > > I'm thinking of traffic entering from the right.  Taking the lane (or
> > > > more of the lane) does help, but when you get cloud cover and flat
> > > > lighting, objects can get lost in a background, and a right turning
> > > > motorists who looks quickly to the left  can miss a drab colored
> > > > cyclist.

> > > That's not been a problem for me when on my bicycle.  I actually can't
> > > remember a single such incident - which doesn't prove that it never
> > > happened or can't happen; just that it doesn't amount to much.

> > Translation:  You "should" work on becoming "comptent" (like Frank).

> Well, Dan, I've been told (by people who should know) that I am very
> competent; that they've learned from riding with me.  But whether or
> not their judgment was correct, a person _should_ work at becoming
> competent.  What are the other choices?  To work at incompetence?  To
> bumble along without any thought?  No thanks.

> > > One reason it might not amount to much could be the typically lower
> > > speed of a bicycle.  The motorist making a right turn would be tending
> > > to move away from you, so closing speed would be lower.  Besides, a
> > > bike doesn't need a whole lot of lane to avoid contact.

> > "Avoid contact"!?  Christ, man - (I understand the part about you
> > being slow, but) are you saying it hasn't been a problem for you
> > because you have had room to dodge?

> Re-read.  I did not say that.  I did say it has not been a problem for
> me.  I believe one big reason is that I do tend to take a very visible
> lane position; furthermore, I've described before (here, I think) my
> habit of moving further left in the lane when I see a car approaching
> a stop sign from my right.

> I recall one event (probably five years ago) when a motorist did start
> to pull out in front of me, then stopped and apologized.  It wasn't a
> close encounter; I was watching even more carefully than usual,
> because I was coming from a direction cars didn't come - a bike-ped
> shortcut into our village center, where it dumped out onto an
> otherwise dead end.  Only one little-used parking lot could have
> produced a car for this guy to yield to, so there's little wonder he
> was less than observant.

> > > I _do_ worry about that when on my motorcycle, and to a certain extent
> > > when in my car.  I worry less on a bicycle, although I generally shift
> > > to the left part of the lane (on either two wheeler) if someone is in
> > > a position to pull out like that.

> > When driving a car, I generally shift to avoid the potholes.  I don't
> > ride a motorcycle on the road, hence I am still alive today.

> I do ride a motorcycle on the road, and have since 1969 or so (with a
> few years off-time from time to time).  I'm still alive today.
> Competence _is_ worth striving for.

fuddy duddy
 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by Dan » Thu, 18 Apr 2013 13:04:34


Quote:




> > > > > ... If it were likely that a motorist didn't
> > > > > see me taking the lane due to visual clutter, I'd have been run over
> > > > > from behind long before now.

> > > > I'm thinking of traffic entering from the right.  Taking the lane (or
> > > > more of the lane) does help, but when you get cloud cover and flat
> > > > lighting, objects can get lost in a background, and a right turning
> > > > motorists who looks quickly to the left  can miss a drab colored
> > > > cyclist.

> > > That's not been a problem for me when on my bicycle.  I actually can't
> > > remember a single such incident - which doesn't prove that it never
> > > happened or can't happen; just that it doesn't amount to much.

> > Translation:  You "should" work on becoming "comptent" (like Frank).

> Well, Dan, I've been told (by people who should know) that I am very
> competent; that they've learned from riding with me.  But whether or
> not their judgment was correct, a person _should_ work at becoming
> competent.  What are the other choices?  To work at incompetence?  To
> bumble along without any thought?  No thanks.

So you *were* suggesting that Jay is incompetent?

My point was that there are many, *many* of us for whom motorists e.g.
pulling out in front of us *is* a problem when on our bicycles, and it
*doesn't* mean we're incompetent, and are long past sick and tired of
that mantra from you.

Quote:

> > > One reason it might not amount to much could be the typically lower
> > > speed of a bicycle.  The motorist making a right turn would be tending
> > > to move away from you, so closing speed would be lower.  Besides, a
> > > bike doesn't need a whole lot of lane to avoid contact.

> > "Avoid contact"!?  Christ, man - (I understand the part about you
> > being slow, but) are you saying it hasn't been a problem for you
> > because you have had room to dodge?

> Re-read.  I did not say that.  I did say it has not been a problem for
> me.

You did say that it hasn't been a problem for you, and then you
supported that with the reasoning, "... a bike doesn't need a whole
lot of lane to avoid contact."  What was that about?

Quote:
> I believe one big reason is that I do tend to take a very visible
> lane position;

That's all well and good - to the extent that it's practicable while
reasonably accommodating other traffic.

Quote:
> ... furthermore, I've described before (here, I think) my
> habit of moving further left in the lane when I see a car approaching
> a stop sign from my right.

So you "take the lane" if a car approaches a stop sign on cross street
to your right?

Quote:
> I recall one event (probably five years ago) when a motorist did start
> to pull out in front of me, then stopped and apologized.  It wasn't a
> close encounter; I was watching even more carefully than usual,
> because I was coming from a direction cars didn't come - a bike-ped
> shortcut into our village center, where it dumped out onto an
> otherwise dead end.  Only one little-used parking lot could have
> produced a car for this guy to yield to, so there's little wonder he
> was less than observant.

Recall earlier in this thread where I said and explained how I can
even kind of understand why motorists are not apt to pay us (positive)
attention.

Quote:

> > > I _do_ worry about that when on my motorcycle, and to a certain extent
> > > when in my car.  I worry less on a bicycle, although I generally shift
> > > to the left part of the lane (on either two wheeler) if someone is in
> > > a position to pull out like that.

> > When driving a car, I generally shift to avoid the potholes.  I don't
> > ride a motorcycle on the road, hence I am still alive today.

> I do ride a motorcycle on the road, and have since 1969 or so (with a
> few years off-time from time to time).  I'm still alive today.
> Competence _is_ worth striving for.

Nobody is saying that it isn't; we're just offended at your constant
suggestion that we are lacking it.
 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by Frank Krygowsk » Thu, 18 Apr 2013 13:35:28


Quote:
> On Apr 16, 3:44 pm, Frank Kr
> > I do ride a motorcycle on the road, and have since 1969 or so (with a
> > few years off-time from time to time). ?I'm still alive today.
> > Competence _is_ worth striving for.

> fuddy duddy

:-) Typical Dan O attitude:  "You're not crashing? You try to be
competent? You're still alive? You fuddy duddy!"

Dan, I notice you're still alive too.  Isn't it time for you to meet
your own standards?

- Frank Krygowski

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by Jame » Thu, 18 Apr 2013 13:40:09


Quote:





>>>>>> ... If it were likely that a motorist didn't
>>>>>> see me taking the lane due to visual clutter, I'd have been run over
>>>>>> from behind long before now.

>>>>> I'm thinking of traffic entering from the right.  Taking the lane (or
>>>>> more of the lane) does help, but when you get cloud cover and flat
>>>>> lighting, objects can get lost in a background, and a right turning
>>>>> motorists who looks quickly to the left  can miss a drab colored
>>>>> cyclist.

>>>> That's not been a problem for me when on my bicycle.  I actually can't
>>>> remember a single such incident - which doesn't prove that it never
>>>> happened or can't happen; just that it doesn't amount to much.

>>> Translation:  You "should" work on becoming "comptent" (like Frank).

>> Well, Dan, I've been told (by people who should know) that I am very
>> competent; that they've learned from riding with me.  But whether or
>> not their judgment was correct, a person _should_ work at becoming
>> competent.  What are the other choices?  To work at incompetence?  To
>> bumble along without any thought?  No thanks.

> So you *were* suggesting that Jay is incompetent?

> My point was that there are many, *many* of us for whom motorists e.g.
> pulling out in front of us *is* a problem when on our bicycles, and it
> *doesn't* mean we're incompetent, and are long past sick and tired of
> that mantra from you.

I'm still wondering how Frank has never had a car pull out in front of
him from a side road.  He makes it sound like he's never even needed to
dodge one, or yell so that they stop.

His competence must stick out like a sore thumb. ;-)

Quote:
>>>> One reason it might not amount to much could be the typically lower
>>>> speed of a bicycle.  The motorist making a right turn would be tending
>>>> to move away from you, so closing speed would be lower.  Besides, a
>>>> bike doesn't need a whole lot of lane to avoid contact.

>>> "Avoid contact"!?  Christ, man - (I understand the part about you
>>> being slow, but) are you saying it hasn't been a problem for you
>>> because you have had room to dodge?

>> Re-read.  I did not say that.  I did say it has not been a problem for
>> me.

> You did say that it hasn't been a problem for you, and then you
> supported that with the reasoning, "... a bike doesn't need a whole
> lot of lane to avoid contact."  What was that about?

Back pedaling?

Quote:
>> I believe one big reason is that I do tend to take a very visible
>> lane position;

> That's all well and good - to the extent that it's practicable while
> reasonably accommodating other traffic.

>> ... furthermore, I've described before (here, I think) my
>> habit of moving further left in the lane when I see a car approaching
>> a stop sign from my right.

> So you "take the lane" if a car approaches a stop sign on cross street
> to your right?

I do, and if I have enough time to check what's behind me and there's
nothing, I move out even further.  I have had to move out to the next
lane and go around a car that pulled out in front of me.

In fact the situation arose not that long ago.  I was on a smallish
rural road with few other cars around, in the middle of a bright sunny
day when an oncoming car turned right into a driveway and stopped just
ahead of me.  That was fine, but I thought "Hmm, I bet he's going to
reverse out and head in my direction."  So I check what was behind me -
nothing - and as I approached I moved out and saw the reverse lights on.
  As I got closer, so he reversed out  in front of me, completely
blocking the lane I was in, so I moved over to the wrong side of the
road and passed him.

Before I had moved back to my normal position on the road, he
accelerated up on my left (your right) and literally held me out there
until he'd got back in front of me.  He had his window down.  I said as
he passed, "What are you doing?"  He just waved like it was nothing and
kept going.

So much for giving way.

Quote:
>> I recall one event (probably five years ago) when a motorist did start
>> to pull out in front of me, then stopped and apologized.  It wasn't a
>> close encounter; I was watching even more carefully than usual,
>> because I was coming from a direction cars didn't come - a bike-ped
>> shortcut into our village center, where it dumped out onto an
>> otherwise dead end.  Only one little-used parking lot could have
>> produced a car for this guy to yield to, so there's little wonder he
>> was less than observant.

> Recall earlier in this thread where I said and explained how I can
> even kind of understand why motorists are not apt to pay us (positive)
> attention.

I was wondering how it had never happened to Frank, but now I find it
has.  Fancy that!  His competence wasn't conspicuous enough that day.

--
JS

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by Jame » Thu, 18 Apr 2013 13:45:35


Quote:

>> On Apr 16, 3:44 pm, Frank Kr
>>> I do ride a motorcycle on the road, and have since 1969 or so (with a
>>> few years off-time from time to time).  I'm still alive today.
>>> Competence _is_ worth striving for.

>> fuddy duddy

> :-) Typical Dan O attitude:  "You're not crashing? You try to be
> competent? You're still alive? You fuddy duddy!"

> Dan, I notice you're still alive too.  Isn't it time for you to meet
> your own standards?

Like the Immortals motor bike club out here, I wonder what happens when
one inevitably dies.  Do they strip him of his Immortals jacket and
excommunicate him?  After all, he wasn't a real immortal.

http://www.immortals.com.au/

--
JS.

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by Dan » Thu, 18 Apr 2013 13:50:39


Quote:

> > On Apr 16, 3:44 pm, Frank Kr
> > > I do ride a motorcycle on the road, and have since 1969 or so (with a
> > > few years off-time from time to time).  I'm still alive today.
> > > Competence _is_ worth striving for.

> > fuddy duddy

> :-) Typical Dan O attitude:  "You're not crashing? You try to be
> competent? You're still alive? You fuddy duddy!"

Let me take a page from Frank's playbook...

"Let's summarize:  You've descibed at length your [blah, blah, blah],
you've bragged about [blah, blah, blah]... "

fuddy duddy

Quote:
> Dan, I notice you're still alive too.  Isn't it time for you to meet
> your own standards?

I am alive today more thanks to my competency than you are thanks to
yours.  You are alive today more due being chickenshit.
 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by Frank Krygowsk » Thu, 18 Apr 2013 14:03:28


Quote:


> > > Translation: ?You "should" work on becoming "comptent" (like Frank).

> > Well, Dan, I've been told (by people who should know) that I am very
> > competent; that they've learned from riding with me. ?But whether or
> > not their judgment was correct, a person _should_ work at becoming
> > competent. ?What are the other choices? ?To work at incompetence? ?To
> > bumble along without any thought? ?No thanks.

> So you *were* suggesting that Jay is incompetent?

That's not what I said, Dan.  You need to get more competent at
reading.

Quote:
> My point was that there are many, *many* of us for whom motorists e.g.
> pulling out in front of us *is* a problem when on our bicycles, and it
> *doesn't* mean we're incompetent, and are long past sick and tired of
> that mantra from you.

Let's review.  You and I have very different riding styles, based on
what's posted here.  You say you are one of many, *many* who have lots
of problems on the road.  I don't seem to have those problems nearly
as often.

Yet you think your riding style is just as good as mine - or, really,
far better.  Based on your own complaints, how on earth can you
justify that?  Are you pretending that your misfortune is due only to
weirdly consistent bad luck?  Or were you born under the wrong
astrological sign?  Or is some witchcraft working against you?

I believe in cause and effect.  I made serious effort to read, study,
attend programs and classes, and LEARN the best way to ride.  And -
son of a gun! - it seems to work. Getting knowledge and training has
produced beneficial results.

Meanwhile, you have apparently spent your time pretending that you are
uniquely observant, hyper-perceptive, tremendously skilled, and much
smarter than those people who ride non-chaotically.  But motorists
pulling out is a problem for you - as is crashing in various other
ways.  Funny how you don't connect your riding style to your problems
on the road!

Maybe you need to sacrifice some chickens to the gods of the chaotic
road, so they'll bless your primitive, uneducated riding style.  Or
maybe you need to learn what the hell you're supposed to do on a
bicycle.  It's your choice, of course.

I know which one works for most people. But I also "know" you're 100%
unique and not described by any data - exactly like all the other
wrong-way, drunk, sidewalk-zooming, no-lights-at-night, "don't tell me
what to do" bike riders that dominate the crash counts.

- Frank Krygowski

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by Dan » Thu, 18 Apr 2013 14:26:32


Quote:



> > > > Translation:  You "should" work on becoming "comptent" (like Frank).

> > > Well, Dan, I've been told (by people who should know) that I am very
> > > competent; that they've learned from riding with me.  But whether or
> > > not their judgment was correct, a person _should_ work at becoming
> > > competent.  What are the other choices?  To work at incompetence?  To
> > > bumble along without any thought?  No thanks.

> > So you *were* suggesting that Jay is incompetent?

> That's not what I said, Dan.  You need to get more competent at
> reading.

you said some of th eusual stuff suggesting that Jay's problem may (or
must) be due to his incompetence.  I called you on it.  Then you
*defended*  the need to work on becoming competent!  Jeez Louise, man!

Quote:
> > My point was that there are many, *many* of us for whom motorists e.g.
> > pulling out in front of us *is* a problem when on our bicycles, and it
> > *doesn't* mean we're incompetent, and are long past sick and tired of
> > that mantra from you.

> Let's review.  You and I have very different riding styles, based on
> what's posted here.

Frank and Dan riding bikes (motorized or not) through town.  Everyone
swoons when they see Frank, "Oh, he's so *competent*, *so* brave!" ;-)

Quote:
> You say you are one of many, *many* who have lots
> of problems on the road.

I think I say, "there are many, *many* of us for whom motorists e.g.
pulling out in front of us *is* a problem when on our bicycles"

Quote:
>  I don't seem to have those problems nearly
> as often.

Risk / reward.  Different values.

Quote:
> Yet you think your riding style is just as good as mine - or, really,
> far better.

Far better for my purposes.  I've been quite clear on that.  I
wouldn't even call you a fuddy duddy - would instead say, "nothing
worng with that" - if you didn't so egregiously denigrate me
personally.

Quote:
>  Based on your own complaints, how on earth can you
> justify that?  Are you pretending that your misfortune is due only to
> weirdly consistent bad luck?  Or were you born under the wrong
> astrological sign?  Or is some witchcraft working against you?

"Consistent bad luck"?  I have a mix of luck like everyone (forgot to
mention how luck - or providence, whatever - figures prominently
alonside competency in keeping me alive.)

Quote:
> I believe in cause and effect.  I made serious effort to read, study,
> attend programs and classes, and LEARN the best way to ride.

Phhhhbbbbbttt!!

Quote:
>  And -
> son of a gun! - it seems to work. Getting knowledge and training has
> produced beneficial results.

Alonside being chickenshit.

Quote:
> Meanwhile, you have apparently spent your time pretending that you are
> uniquely observant, hyper-perceptive, tremendously skilled, and much
> smarter than those people who ride non-chaotically.  But motorists
> pulling out is a problem for you - as is crashing in various other
> ways.  Funny how you don't connect your riding style to your problems
> on the road!

I absolutely understand cause and effect and risk / reward.

Quote:
> Maybe you need to sacrifice some chickens to the gods...

Speaking of chickens...

Quote:
> ... of the chaotic
> road,

Where have you gone, Hans Monderman?

Quote:
> ... so they'll bless your primitive, uneducated riding style.  Or
> maybe you need to learn what the hell you're supposed to do on a
> bicycle.  It's your choice, of course.

"Supposed to do".  And there we have it in a nutshell.

Quote:
> I know which one works for most people. But I also "know" you're 100%
> unique and not described by any data...

I know data pretty well, man.

Quote:
> - exactly like all the other
> wrong-way, drunk, sidewalk-zooming, no-lights-at-night, "don't tell me
> what to do" bike riders that dominate the crash counts.

Sure, just pick one at random.  Call him Dan... or Fred - whatever.
Of course you're "exactly" right.

And you tell everyone else there is always more to learn.

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by frkry.. » Thu, 18 Apr 2013 23:12:39

Quote:

> I'm still wondering how Frank has never had a car pull out in front of

> him from a side road.  He makes it sound like he's never even needed to

> dodge one, or yell so that they stop.

That's not what I said.  I have yelled at car drivers and gotten them to stop.  About a week ago, I yelled at a ***ager backing rapidly out his driveway from my left.  (This was at the other end of the short village bike-ped path, and his house is the last on the portion of street that's a dead end except for bikes, so I suppose he feels there's no need to check.)

Still, I've never come within ten feet of a car-bike collision from someone pulling out in front of me from a stop sign or driveway.  And Jay was originally talking about motorists turning right from a stop sign, which should be even less of a problem, since they'd be turning away from my travel.

Quote:
> > So you "take the lane" if a car approaches a stop sign on cross street

> > to your right?

> I do, and if I have enough time to check what's behind me and there's

> nothing, I move out even further.  I have had to move out to the next

> lane and go around a car that pulled out in front of me.

I do as well, and I still remember the day (years ago) when I realized it was an automatic reaction on my part - that I do it as a matter of habit or reflex.  And like many reflexes, I think it improves with conscious practice.

- Frank Krygowski