Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by Frank Krygowsk » Thu, 11 Apr 2013 06:18:59


Yesterday evening, I biked up to the grocery store right at dusk.  As
I was parking the bike, a guy who had just parked his car came up to
me and asked "What is it that makes that headlight so good?  It's
really bright."  I briefly explained the Shimano hub generator and B&M
Cyo LED headlight.  He seemed impressed.

I like collecting these spontaneous compliments on my lights.

- Frank Krygowski

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by Jame » Thu, 11 Apr 2013 08:43:25


Quote:
> Yesterday evening, I biked up to the grocery store right at dusk.  As
> I was parking the bike, a guy who had just parked his car came up to
> me and asked "What is it that makes that headlight so good?  It's
> really bright."  I briefly explained the Shimano hub generator and B&M
> Cyo LED headlight.  He seemed impressed.

> I like collecting these spontaneous compliments on my lights.

I had some motorists wait for what seemed like an eternity the other
night for me to pass before they pulled out of a side road.  I take that
as a compliment.

On a similar technical note, I saw an advert for a 2200 lumen bike light
the other day.  WTF?  That equates to about 22W of electrical power, and
a heat sink that must get to hot to touch!  Really, the absurdity of
lumen wars between manufacturers has got to come to a head, doesn't it?

--
JS

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by Dan » Thu, 11 Apr 2013 09:22:53


Quote:
> Yesterday evening, I biked up to the grocery store right at dusk.  As
> I was parking the bike, a guy who had just parked his car came up to
> me and asked "What is it that makes that headlight so good?  It's
> really bright."  I briefly explained the Shimano hub generator and B&M
> Cyo LED headlight.  He seemed impressed.

> I like collecting these spontaneous compliments on my lights.

And you should do what you like if it doesn't hurt anyone else.

I, too, like to be acknowledged - but more so just to be treated with
respect than have my ego puffed; and I like to see where I'm going,
use my headlight on different bikes, and fix flats with a minimum of
hassle.

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by Andre Jut » Thu, 11 Apr 2013 09:23:31

Quote:


> > Yesterday evening, I biked up to the grocery store right at dusk.  As

> > I was parking the bike, a guy who had just parked his car came up to

> > me and asked "What is it that makes that headlight so good?  It's

> > really bright."  I briefly explained the Shimano hub generator and B&M

> > Cyo LED headlight.  He seemed impressed.

> > I like collecting these spontaneous compliments on my lights.

> I had some motorists wait for what seemed like an eternity the other

> night for me to pass before they pulled out of a side road.  I take that

> as a compliment.

> On a similar technical note, I saw an advert for a 2200 lumen bike light

> the other day.  WTF?  That equates to about 22W of electrical power, and

> a heat sink that must get to hot to touch!  Really, the absurdity of

> lumen wars between manufacturers has got to come to a head, doesn't it?

> --

> JS

I have an 36V 8.8aH battery. With a 2200 lumen lamp I could almost make it to the shops and back...

Andre Jute

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by Dan » Thu, 11 Apr 2013 09:27:56


Quote:

> > Yesterday evening, I biked up to the grocery store right at dusk.  As
> > I was parking the bike, a guy who had just parked his car came up to
> > me and asked "What is it that makes that headlight so good?  It's
> > really bright."  I briefly explained the Shimano hub generator and B&M
> > Cyo LED headlight.  He seemed impressed.

> > I like collecting these spontaneous compliments on my lights.

> I had some motorists wait for what seemed like an eternity the other
> night for me to pass before they pulled out of a side road.  I take that
> as a compliment.

What I said to Frank about "... more so... "

Quote:
> On a similar technical note, I saw an advert for a 2200 lumen bike light
> the other day.  WTF?  That equates to about 22W of electrical power, and
> a heat sink that must get to hot to touch!  Really, the absurdity of
> lumen wars between manufacturers has got to come to a head, doesn't it?

There's this guy on a bike that I pass in opposite directions out in
the sticks (we're really about the only ones ever out there).  He's
obviously into maximum lighting power.  Right after Christmas I see
him coming at me from a *long* way, but I didn't recognize it as him.
He had new headlights - one on the bike and one on his head - *killer*
bright.  It looked like the aliens had landed and were on the move
across land.

People are different (and kind of the same).  Personally, I guess I'm
not quite that afraid of the dark.

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by datakol » Thu, 11 Apr 2013 20:30:26

http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2004/elephants.jpg

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by datakol » Sat, 13 Apr 2013 08:45:00

so what's new since then ?
 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by SMS » Mon, 15 Apr 2013 04:08:21


Quote:
> I, too, like to be acknowledged - but more so just to be treated with
> respect than have my ego puffed; and I like to see where I'm going,
> use my headlight on different bikes, and fix flats with a minimum of
> hassle.

That's the ultimate compliment.

However this morning I rode over to the electronics flea market at the
local community college and while walking around with my bicycle I
received three spontaneous compliments on my lights in just 30 minutes.
This was the Costco/Feit 500 lumen flashlight attached with heat shrink
covered conduit clamps. One person asked where I got the clamp, because
it doesn't look like a home-brew device (probably due to the fact that
it's covered with black heat shrink so it looks more like a clamp used
for bicycle accessories).

I also ran into (not literally) a co-worker of mine from the 1980's who
told me that he had just had an accident with a bicycle a week ago when
he turned into a parking lot in front of a bicycle that was going
straight, with the usual "I just didn't see him coming up on the side."
This highlights why it is so desirable for daytime cyclists to have
front strobes, they make the cyclist much more visible. Fortunately the
cyclist wasn't injured and my former colleague paid him for a new wheel.

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by Dan » Mon, 15 Apr 2013 04:35:26


Quote:

> > I, too, like to be acknowledged - but more so just to be treated with
> > respect than have my ego puffed; and I like to see where I'm going,
> > use my headlight on different bikes, and fix flats with a minimum of
> > hassle.

> That's the ultimate compliment.

> However this morning I rode over to the electronics flea market at the
> local community college and while walking around with my bicycle I
> received three spontaneous compliments on my lights in just 30 minutes.
> This was the Costco/Feit 500 lumen flashlight attached with heat shrink
> covered conduit clamps. One person asked where I got the clamp, because
> it doesn't look like a home-brew device (probably due to the fact that
> it's covered with black heat shrink so it looks more like a clamp used
> for bicycle accessories).

> I also ran into (not literally) a co-worker of mine from the 1980's who
> told me that he had just had an accident with a bicycle a week ago when
> he turned into a parking lot in front of a bicycle that was going
> straight, with the usual "I just didn't see him coming up on the side."
> This highlights why it is so desirable for daytime cyclists to have
> front strobes, they make the cyclist much more visible. Fortunately the
> cyclist wasn't injured and my former colleague paid him for a new wheel.

Daytime?  If you don't look for a blithe bicyclist coming up on the
side, you're not going to see the strobe any more than you'll see the
bicyclist themself (at night I can envision the potential for an
auxilliary strobe reflecting off of things to gain attention, but I
can't stand everything flashing in front of me while riding in the
dark anyway, and only use my strobe in reduced visibility - but enough
ambient light that solid light gains no appreciable light to see by,
and sometimes in e.g. heavy traffic where it *might* be the extra
noticeability against distraction / inattention).

The main thing there, of course if a non-blithe bicyclist anticipating
blockhead actions like the ol' right hook.

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by Frank Krygowsk » Mon, 15 Apr 2013 05:08:19


Quote:

> > I, too, like to be acknowledged - but more so just to be treated with
> > respect than have my ego puffed; and I like to see where I'm going,
> > use my headlight on different bikes, and fix flats with a minimum of
> > hassle.

> That's the ultimate compliment.

> However this morning I rode over to the electronics flea market at the
> local community college and while walking around with my bicycle I
> received three spontaneous compliments on my lights in just 30 minutes.

You were walking around with your handlebar-mounted flashlight on??

Quote:
> This was the Costco/Feit 500 lumen flashlight attached with heat shrink
> covered conduit clamps. One person asked where I got the clamp, because
> it doesn't look like a home-brew device (probably due to the fact that
> it's covered with black heat shrink so it looks more like a clamp used
> for bicycle accessories).

> I also ran into (not literally) a co-worker of mine from the 1980's who
> told me that he had just had an accident with a bicycle a week ago when
> he turned into a parking lot in front of a bicycle that was going
> straight, with the usual "I just didn't see him coming up on the side."
> This highlights why it is so desirable for daytime cyclists to have
> front strobes, they make the cyclist much more visible. Fortunately the
> cyclist wasn't injured and my former colleague paid him for a new wheel.

That sounds like a right hook crash.  The proper cure for a right hook
is not a strobe light, and in fact, a strobe light won't show up when
a cyclist is in a motorist's _blind_ spot.

That cyclist should not have been "coming up on the side"; that is, he
shouldn't have been passing on the right where there's any likelihood
that a motorist will turn right, unless he's riding slowly and ready
for an instantaneous panic stop.  Passing on the right is always dicey
at best, and if done at all, should be done with tremendous care,
strobe light or not.

No competent traffic engineer would ever put a straight-through lane
to the right of a right turn lane. Yet incompetent traffic engineers
do exactly that with some bike lanes; and cyclists with even less
competence ride that same way on their own volition.

- Frank Krygowski

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by Dan » Mon, 15 Apr 2013 07:10:09


Quote:


> > > I, too, like to be acknowledged - but more so just to be treated with
> > > respect than have my ego puffed; and I like to see where I'm going,
> > > use my headlight on different bikes, and fix flats with a minimum of
> > > hassle.

> > That's the ultimate compliment.

> > However this morning I rode over to the electronics flea market at the
> > local community college and while walking around with my bicycle I
> > received three spontaneous compliments on my lights in just 30 minutes.

> You were walking around with your handlebar-mounted flashlight on??

I think if you read the whole post it was clear that the compliments
were on the installation.

- Show quoted text -

Quote:
> > This was the Costco/Feit 500 lumen flashlight attached with heat shrink
> > covered conduit clamps. One person asked where I got the clamp, because
> > it doesn't look like a home-brew device (probably due to the fact that
> > it's covered with black heat shrink so it looks more like a clamp used
> > for bicycle accessories).

> > I also ran into (not literally) a co-worker of mine from the 1980's who
> > told me that he had just had an accident with a bicycle a week ago when
> > he turned into a parking lot in front of a bicycle that was going
> > straight, with the usual "I just didn't see him coming up on the side."
> > This highlights why it is so desirable for daytime cyclists to have
> > front strobes, they make the cyclist much more visible. Fortunately the
> > cyclist wasn't injured and my former colleague paid him for a new wheel.

> That sounds like a right hook crash.  The proper cure for a right hook
> is not a strobe light, and in fact, a strobe light won't show up when
> a cyclist is in a motorist's _blind_ spot.

Ah, but in reduced ambient lighting it will reflect very noticeably
for a great distance off of all manner of surrounding street signs and
mirrors and...

Quote:
> That cyclist should not have been "coming up on the side"; that is, he
> shouldn't have been passing on the right where there's any likelihood
> that a motorist will turn right, unless he's riding slowly and ready
> for an instantaneous panic stop.  Passing on the right is always dicey
> at best, and if done at all, should be done with tremendous care,
> strobe light or not.

"Should" this, "shouldn't" that.

The right hooked bicyclist is not necessarily "passing on the right";
they're JRA and the passing motorist suddenly slows dramatically and
chops off the bicyclist.

That said, it is anticipatable.  Right hook crashes are either the
result of blitheness or maybe stubborn, stupid insistence on
exercising right-of-way.

Quote:
> No competent traffic engineer would ever put a straight-through lane
> to the right of a right turn lane. Yet incompetent traffic engineers
> do exactly that with some bike lanes; and cyclists with even less
> competence ride that same way on their own volition.

Bumbling incompetents!  (Stop wringing your damn hands.)

The law and cooperative common sense is pretty much universal "as far
right as practicable".  "Lanes" have nothing to do with it.  There's
no problem whatsoever with riding straight through to the right of a
right turn lane; the problem only arises when riding straight through
to the right of right turning traffic - lanes notwithstanding.  People
have to use their heads, navigate, anticipate, and negotiate rather
than expect everything to be layed out and prescribed for them.

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by SMS » Mon, 15 Apr 2013 09:34:53


Quote:
> Daytime?  If you don't look for a blithe bicyclist coming up on the
> side, you're not going to see the strobe any more than you'll see the
> bicyclist themself.

In the daytime unlit cyclists are much less conspicuous than a well lit
cyclist at night. In the daytime unlit cyclists blend in with all the
other unlit stuff between the sidewalk and the traffic lane such as
parked cars, street light poles, etc. At night, a properly lit cyclist
is distinguished from all these other items.

I know that when I'm driving in the daytime a cyclist with a strobe
light is far more visible than an unlit cyclist.

Of course the whole idea behind daytime running lights, and especially
the requirement in many states that motorcycles have their lights on all
the time is based on the fact that the light makes the vehicle more
visible in the daytime.

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by SMS » Mon, 15 Apr 2013 10:19:36


Part of it was that. But part of it was that I guess I forgot to turn
off the strobe when I reached the venue of the event.

Quote:
> The law and cooperative common sense is pretty much universal "as far
> right as practicable".  "Lanes" have nothing to do with it.  There's
> no problem whatsoever with riding straight through to the right of a
> right turn lane; the problem only arises when riding straight through
> to the right of right turning traffic - lanes notwithstanding.  People
> have to use their heads, navigate, anticipate, and negotiate rather
> than expect everything to be layed out and prescribed for them.

In this case there was no right turn lane. There was the right lane and
the bike lane. The cyclist should have been exceptionally careful
because of the type of shopping center. It was on a Saturday too, when
this particular shopping center is rather terrifying.

The key thing in this sort of traffic configuration is for the cyclists
to make themselves as conspicuous as possible. A front strobe definitely
helps. It won't stop someone who doesn't look to the right rear before
turning, but it will help someone who does glance because a strobe is so
conspicuous.

 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by SMS » Mon, 15 Apr 2013 10:20:22


Quote:

>> Daytime?  If you don't look for a blithe bicyclist coming up on the
>> side, you're not going to see the strobe any more than you'll see the
>> bicyclist themself.

> In the daytime unlit cyclists are much less conspicuous than a well lit
> cyclist at night. In the daytime unlit cyclists blend in with all the
> other unlit stuff between the sidewalk and the traffic lane such as
> parked cars, street light poles, etc. At night, a properly lit cyclist
> is distinguished from all these other items.

> I know that when I'm driving in the daytime a cyclist with a strobe
> light is far more visible than an unlit cyclist.

> Of course the whole idea behind daytime running lights, and especially
> the requirement in many states that motorcycles have their lights on all
> the time is based on the fact that the light makes the vehicle more
> visible in the daytime.

Forgot the picture link for the area: <http://oi45.tinypic.com/fnbipj.jpg>
 
 
 

Another spontaneous headlight compliment

Post by datakol » Mon, 15 Apr 2013 12:06:35

good photo...move immediately to cleaner air.
walk
do not drink the tap water