"Old," "Young," "Midddle Aged," "Elderly," "Teenie Boppie,"and other terms.

"Old," "Young," "Midddle Aged," "Elderly," "Teenie Boppie,"and other terms.

Post by Colorado Bicycle » Tue, 31 May 2005 21:41:12


"Old," "Young," "Midddle Aged," "Elderly," "***ie Boppie,"and other
terms.

None of the above terms has any real meaning to the author and
especialy to the reader.  Each is used in the context of the writer and
his/her own plane of reference.

So, Claire, why not say something like this:

"I was trying to pass a gentleman who appeared to be about 80 years
old" (or whatever his age appeared to you) rather than an "old" man?
This leaves much less to the imagination (perhaps not the intention
desired) and helps the reader to form a much more accurate impression
of the subject character.  Certainly more appropriate, IMHO.

 
 
 

"Old," "Young," "Midddle Aged," "Elderly," "Teenie Boppie,"and other terms.

Post by Maggi » Tue, 31 May 2005 22:00:23

Quote:

> "Old," "Young," "Midddle Aged," "Elderly," "***ie Boppie,"and other
> terms.

> None of the above terms has any real meaning to the author and
> especialy to the reader.  Each is used in the context of the writer and
> his/her own plane of reference.

Boy, isn't that the truth. I remember when I was 19 and I met my future
sister in law.  She was 30.  I was horrified.  I thought she was so
old. I will never forget that. To me, at that time, 30 was very old.

We certainly are writing from our own plane of reference.  My youngest
son thinks my older son is old because he will be 30 soon.  My 30 year
old thinks his 40 year old cousin is over the hill.  I guess I should
have one foot in the grave.  Yet my parents, who are 85, think I am
young. ;-)  The words old and young mean something different to
everyone.

BTW...my future son in law installed the cyclocomputer on my bicycle
this morning and I went for a 5 mile ride.  It was very nice to know
the distance.  Now tomorrow I can see how many miles it is to ride to
work.

Maggie

 
 
 

"Old," "Young," "Midddle Aged," "Elderly," "Teenie Boppie,"and other terms.

Post by psycholis » Tue, 31 May 2005 22:45:16


Quote:


>> "Old," "Young," "Midddle Aged," "Elderly," "***ie Boppie,"and other
>> terms.

>> None of the above terms has any real meaning to the author and
>> especialy to the reader.  Each is used in the context of the writer and
>> his/her own plane of reference.

> Boy, isn't that the truth. I remember when I was 19 and I met my future
> sister in law.  She was 30.  I was horrified.  I thought she was so
> old. I will never forget that. To me, at that time, 30 was very old.

> We certainly are writing from our own plane of reference.  My youngest
> son thinks my older son is old because he will be 30 soon.  My 30 year
> old thinks his 40 year old cousin is over the hill.  I guess I should
> have one foot in the grave.  Yet my parents, who are 85, think I am
> young. ;-)  The words old and young mean something different to
> everyone.

> BTW...my future son in law installed the cyclocomputer on my bicycle
> this morning and I went for a 5 mile ride.  It was very nice to know
> the distance.  Now tomorrow I can see how many miles it is to ride to
> work.

> Maggie

On Saturday, I was a spry, young 49 year old as I banged out a sub-4 1/2
hour century finishing in the front group of three accompanied by a couple
of guys nearly 20 years younger than me.

Then I woke up Sunday morning and I was most definately an old man again.
Ouch.

--
Bob C.

"Of course it hurts.  The trick is not minding that it hurts."
T. E. Lawrence (of Arabia)

 
 
 

"Old," "Young," "Midddle Aged," "Elderly," "Teenie Boppie,"and other terms.

Post by Rich » Tue, 31 May 2005 23:24:36

Quote:

> BTW...my future son in law installed the cyclocomputer on my bicycle
> this morning and I went for a 5 mile ride.

That's great!  I personally find that having a cyclocomputer encourages
me to go just a little bit faster each time in an effort to beat the
last ride's average.

Rich

 
 
 

"Old," "Young," "Midddle Aged," "Elderly," "Teenie Boppie,"and other terms.

Post by Peter Col » Tue, 31 May 2005 23:54:04

Quote:

> So, Claire, why not say something like this:

> "I was trying to pass a gentleman who appeared to be about 80 years
> old" (or whatever his age appeared to you) rather than an "old" man?
> This leaves much less to the imagination (perhaps not the intention
> desired) and helps the reader to form a much more accurate impression
> of the subject character.  Certainly more appropriate, IMHO.

I agree that that form is more appropriate, but it's still based on
appearances (beard, white hair, age of helmet, etc.). Even if you knew
the guy's exact age, how much should that color your expectations? Sure,
there's an inevitable physical decline of some capacities with age, but
I think there's an unfortunate tendency to exaggerate them or attribute
them to the wrong cause.

Even if you knew the guy was 80, what expectation should you have?
Classic ideas about aging predicted a 1%/yr drop in VO2 max after 40, so
that would put him at 60%. That would give him roughly a 30% decline in
speed, turning him from perhaps a 20 mph rider to a 14 mph one. More
recent studies have shown that it should be possible to at least halve
this decline, by maintaining fitness, so he might have gone from 20 to
17-18. Of course this is just for intensity, endurance is another story.
I have been cheerfully passed by riders with 2 decades on me many times
on ultra rides while I was suffering badly, endurance doesn't seem to
decline as much (although recovery may).

Expectations that are more pessimistic than science supports are simply
negative biases. It's a subtle thing. The most troubling aspect of it is
that people tend to live up to their expectations. Trying to break out
of all that is difficult enough without the condescension of younger
people, well intentioned or not.

 
 
 

"Old," "Young," "Midddle Aged," "Elderly," "Teenie Boppie,"and other terms.

Post by Maggi » Wed, 01 Jun 2005 00:06:52

Quote:

> Then I woke up Sunday morning and I was most definately an old man again.
> Ouch.

> --
> Bob C.

Don't ya just love it when you do something absolutely wonderful and do
it as if you were 21 again.....it just makes you feel so great.  Then
the next day, you want to take 6 tylenol and sleep in all day.  I went
to a party this past year, and partied like I was in my twenties again.
 It took me a week to recover.   But it was fun while I was dancing my
ass off and drinking one too many vodka and tonics.  Big Ouch and Big
Headache and a long recovery from one party.  Bi reminder that I am not
20 any longer.

When I was 20, I could party hearty and jump out of bed the next day
and go to work.  No problemo.  We get older. We adjust.  Or we at least
try to adjust.  

Maggie

 
 
 

"Old," "Young," "Midddle Aged," "Elderly," "Teenie Boppie,"and other terms.

Post by Maggi » Wed, 01 Jun 2005 00:12:19

Quote:


> > BTW...my future son in law installed the cyclocomputer on my bicycle
> > this morning and I went for a 5 mile ride.

> That's great!  I personally find that having a cyclocomputer encourages
> me to go just a little bit faster each time in an effort to beat the
> last ride's average.

> Rich

I have to admit, it was fun using it.  My future son-in-law had one on
his bike, so he knew exactly how to install it.  It took him a few
minutes.  Now he spends most of his time flying all over the country
for work, so he doesn't use his bike much. He commutes by plane. :-)
It was fun though....especially knowing the distance.  I avoided
looking at the speed. I am slow. That I know. I don't need a computer
to tell me that.
Maggie.
 
 
 

"Old," "Young," "Midddle Aged," "Elderly," "Teenie Boppie,"and other terms.

Post by Mark Hicke » Wed, 01 Jun 2005 00:29:38

Quote:

>Don't ya just love it when you do something absolutely wonderful and do
>it as if you were 21 again.....

Not really.  Other than the fact I'm considerably faster now than when
I was 21, I like to think I do most things a lot better than when I
had only 44% of my current experience.

Mark Hickey
Habanero Cycles
http://www.habcycles.com
Home of the $695 ti frame

 
 
 

"Old," "Young," "Midddle Aged," "Elderly," "Teenie Boppie,"and other terms.

Post by jj » Wed, 01 Jun 2005 00:45:19


Quote:


>> Then I woke up Sunday morning and I was most definately an old man again.
>> Ouch.

>> --
>> Bob C.

>Don't ya just love it when you do something absolutely wonderful and do
>it as if you were 21 again.....it just makes you feel so great.  Then
>the next day, you want to take 6 tylenol and sleep in all day.  I went
>to a party this past year, and partied like I was in my twenties again.
> It took me a week to recover.   But it was fun while I was dancing my
>ass off and drinking one too many vodka and tonics.  Big Ouch and Big
>Headache and a long recovery from one party.  Bi reminder that I am not
>20 any longer.

>When I was 20, I could party hearty and jump out of bed the next day
>and go to work.  No problemo.  We get older. We adjust.  Or we at least
>try to adjust.  

>Maggie

Face it you're OLD. Do you HEAR ME you're OLD, OLD, OLD. LOL.

jj

 
 
 

"Old," "Young," "Midddle Aged," "Elderly," "Teenie Boppie,"and other terms.

Post by Colorado Bicycle » Wed, 01 Jun 2005 00:57:17

 ">>I was trying to pass a gentleman who appeared to be about 80 years

"appeared" is the operative word here..

If he meets all of Peter's other requirements, then likely he will not
"appear" to be 80, even if he is.

)Hey, have to go for my afternoon nap!  See ya later.)

 
 
 

"Old," "Young," "Midddle Aged," "Elderly," "Teenie Boppie,"and other terms.

Post by Just zis Guy, you know » Wed, 01 Jun 2005 01:07:16




Quote:
>"I was trying to pass a gentleman who appeared to be about 80 years
>old"

Hey, I can pass for 80 on a bad day, too ;-)

Guy
--
May contain traces of irony.  Contents liable to settle after posting.
http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

85% of helmet statistics are made up, 69% of them at CHS, Puget Sound

 
 
 

"Old," "Young," "Midddle Aged," "Elderly," "Teenie Boppie,"and other terms.

Post by frkry.. » Wed, 01 Jun 2005 01:13:51

Quote:

> "Old," "Young," "Midddle Aged," "Elderly," "***ie Boppie,"and other
> terms.

> None of the above terms has any real meaning to the author and
> especialy to the reader.  Each is used in the context of the writer and
> his/her own plane of reference.

I think it's time to take a bold step forward!

We've come miles in our sensitivity in recent decades, although not
everyone's caught on.  Those who are more enlightened no longer label
people by their race.  We understand when calling attention to gender
can be sexist.  We understand that calling attention to a disability
can be offensive - that a person may be "differently-abled" rather than
disabled.  And the world's certainly a better place because of these
efforts!

If these threads have done anything at all of value, they've pointed
out the obvious:  We need to go further!

Yes, the time has come to stop using adjectives!

When describing a person, we should eschew the use of "fat" or "plump"
or "large" or "great big" and just use the word "person."

We should stop references to a person's stature!  Who knows how much
the word "short" might hurt a Shaq admirer?  Who knows how much pain
the word "tall" might bring to a person who's always wanted to be a
jockey?  They're not short, nor tall; they're just a "person"!

Perhaps a woman _does_ look like Nicole Kidman; does that mean she
wants to be labeled "beautiful"?  Perhaps she craves anonymity and
simply hasn't figured out how to blend in with everyone else!  Have a
heart, folks!  She's just a "person."

"Person"!  That should do it!  If you can't describe a person as a
person, just don't describe them at all.

- Frank Krygowski - an old guy with a grey beard who gets slower every
year.

 
 
 

"Old," "Young," "Midddle Aged," "Elderly," "Teenie Boppie,"and other terms.

Post by jj » Wed, 01 Jun 2005 01:50:40


Quote:


>> "Old," "Young," "Midddle Aged," "Elderly," "***ie Boppie,"and other
>> terms.

>> None of the above terms has any real meaning to the author and
>> especialy to the reader.  Each is used in the context of the writer and
>> his/her own plane of reference.

>I think it's time to take a bold step forward!

>We've come miles in our sensitivity in recent decades, although not
>everyone's caught on.  Those who are more enlightened no longer label
>people by their race.  We understand when calling attention to gender
>can be sexist.  We understand that calling attention to a disability
>can be offensive - that a person may be "differently-abled" rather than
>disabled.  And the world's certainly a better place because of these
>efforts!

>If these threads have done anything at all of value, they've pointed
>out the obvious:  We need to go further!

>Yes, the time has come to stop using adjectives!

>When describing a person, we should eschew the use of "fat" or "plump"
>or "large" or "great big" and just use the word "person."

>We should stop references to a person's stature!  Who knows how much
>the word "short" might hurt a Shaq admirer?  Who knows how much pain
>the word "tall" might bring to a person who's always wanted to be a
>jockey?  They're not short, nor tall; they're just a "person"!

>Perhaps a woman _does_ look like Nicole Kidman; does that mean she
>wants to be labeled "beautiful"?  Perhaps she craves anonymity and
>simply hasn't figured out how to blend in with everyone else!  Have a
>heart, folks!  She's just a "person."

>"Person"!  That should do it!  If you can't describe a person as a
>person, just don't describe them at all.

>- Frank Krygowski - an old guy with a grey beard who gets slower every
>year.

Can we still call them 'dumb-ass'? (as in 'that dumb-ass over there') ;-p

jj

 
 
 

"Old," "Young," "Midddle Aged," "Elderly," "Teenie Boppie,"and other terms.

Post by Colorado Bicycle » Wed, 01 Jun 2005 02:50:14

Quote:
>>Yes, the time has come to stop using adjectives!

Finally, finally, Frank understands!
 
 
 

"Old," "Young," "Midddle Aged," "Elderly," "Teenie Boppie,"and other terms.

Post by Leo Lichtma » Wed, 01 Jun 2005 03:00:26

^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Yes, of course, so long as you avoid:  "fat dumb-ass," "old dumb-ass," and
especially, "fat old dumb-ass."