titanium cogs and chainrings

titanium cogs and chainrings

Post by spra.. » Wed, 29 Nov 1995 04:00:00


If anyone has personal experience buying and using titanium cogs or
inner chainrings, I would like to find out more about costs, successes and
failures, and good or bad name brands.

I have heard only two things so far. First is that a ti granny gear lasts forever.
Second is that the really light, drilled out rear cogs can flex so much as to
skip the chain.

 
 
 

titanium cogs and chainrings

Post by Mike Loc » Thu, 30 Nov 1995 04:00:00

Quote:

>If anyone has personal experience buying and using titanium cogs or
>inner chainrings, I would like to find out more about costs, successes and
>failures, and good or bad name brands.

>I have heard only two things so far. First is that a ti granny gear lasts forever.
>Second is that the really light, drilled out rear cogs can flex so much as to
>skip the chain.

On my roadbike I have a hodge-podge of cogs.
3 SRP cogs: 23, 20 and 18
1 Ultegra cog: 16
4 high end MTB cogs: 15,14,13,12

It doesn't shift real smooth off of the Ultegra cog onto the SRP cogs.
The ramps do not allign properly.  Other than that it works well.

I choose this setup after examining my worn out Ultegra cog set.
The 15 and 14 tooth cogs were badly worn, while the 23, 21, and 19
tooth cogs were like new.  OTOH, most of the weight of the cog set
is in the 23, 21, 19, 13, and 12 tooth cogs.  I noticed that the
steel MTB 12 & 13 tooth cogs were significantly lighter than the
Ultegra cogs, and comparable in weight to the SRP cogs of the same
size.

Thus I feel I have a set with about the same weight as a full SRP
set, but at half the cost and much greater life expectancy.

After talking to several people, I most certainly would not expect
a titanium cog or ring to last longer than a hardened steel cog
or ring.  Titanium does not have good wear properties.  Titanium
nitride does have good wear properties (I vaguely recollect seeing
an ad for nitride coated cogs), but its tendency to chip may make
it worse than straight titanium.  Nitrogen ion implantation yields
a chip proof titanium nitride surface over titanium metal, but this
process is so expensive that the military has rejected it for use
on the landing gear of F14s due to the cost (gave the best
performance of any material tried, though).

I have never have any problems with the cogs flexing, even when
climbing a 15% grade. YMMV, especially on your MTB with that
granny gear.

--
--
S'later, Mike Locke

 
 
 

titanium cogs and chainrings

Post by pp000.. » Fri, 01 Dec 1995 04:00:00

Quote:

> Path:

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usenet

Quote:

> Newsgroups: rec.bicycles.tech
> Subject: titanium cogs and chainrings
> Date: 28 Nov 1995 23:02:16 GMT
> Lines: 7


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> X-Newsreader: IBM NewsReader/2 v1.03

> If anyone has personal experience buying and using titanium cogs or
> inner chainrings, I would like to find out more about costs, successes
and
> failures, and good or bad name brands.

> I have heard only two things so far. First is that a ti granny gear
lasts forever.
> Second is that the really light, drilled out rear cogs can flex so much
as to
> skip the chain.

Allow me to preface what information I have to pass your way by first
stating that I have some 15,000 miles logged on titanium chainrings and
cogs  They are expensive, but I think worth it.  For as light as they
are, they wear rather well, unlike their aluminum counterparts.  As
concerns flex and chain skipping, I have not had such an experience.  
Ther are several manufacturers making chainrings and cogs out of
titanium,  In the cog arena, SRP's cogs have ramps like Shimano's
hyperglide cogs, if that matters to you.  I happen to be riding products
from Boone Industries.  These particular products are meticulously
machined and asthetically pleasing, besides being functional.  One might
refer to them as utilitarian titanium jewelry with which to dress up your
bike.  I am entirely satisfied with my choice.  If you are at all
interested call Booe Industries at (770) 974-COGS, and ask, and be sure
to tell him that I recommended him and gave him a plug on the Internet. -
Jim McNamara.

 
 
 

titanium cogs and chainrings

Post by Nick Colacin » Fri, 01 Dec 1995 04:00:00


Quote:
> If anyone has personal experience buying and using titanium cogs or
> inner chainrings, I would like to find out more about costs, successes and
> failures, and good or bad name brands.

> I have heard only two things so far. First is that a ti granny gear lasts forever.
> Second is that the really light, drilled out rear cogs can flex so much as to
> skip the chain.

Steel inner rings last a damn long time as well, and are dirt cheap. I
would put my money elsewhere to save 20 grams.

As far as ti cogs go, I've ridden an SRP 12-30 for the last year and a
half + and have not had a problem with undue wear or  a skipping chain. I
keep my bike in excellent shape, so I can't tell you what happens if you
just ride and never perform any maintenance. I liked the fact that you
can get different combinations than the stock Shimano offerings. I can't
tell if they are any better or not, they just do their job and don't
cause any fuss. I hope that helps.

Nick Colacino

 
 
 

titanium cogs and chainrings

Post by PEasl » Sun, 03 Dec 1995 04:00:00

I use a SRP cassette on my 18.2 lb triple road bike.  Works just fine!
 
 
 

titanium cogs and chainrings

Post by Zach Kapla » Sun, 03 Dec 1995 04:00:00

Quote:

>>If anyone has personal experience buying and using titanium cogs or
>>inner chainrings, I would like to find out more about costs, successes and
>>failures, and good or bad name brands.

>>I have heard only two things so far. First is that a ti granny gear lasts forever.
>>Second is that the really light, drilled out rear cogs can flex so much as to
>>skip the chain.

Maybe the flexing you mentioned is why my Boone 11-32 cogset sometimes
briefly skips when I am accelerating hard. It usually only happens in
the 32 cog, though it has sometimes happened in the 28. The rear mech is
adjusted fine so maybe it is from cog flex as they have a great deal of
material machined out of them, especially the largest cogs.

Otherwise the cogs shift adequately though not up to Hyperglide
standards in terms of power shifting under heavy load. So far they are
wearing OK though I had a previous experience with the Action-Tec cogs
were the 11t cog wore out rapidly.

Zach Kaplan

 
 
 

titanium cogs and chainrings

Post by Bob L » Mon, 04 Dec 1995 04:00:00


Nick Colacino says...
Quote:

>As far as ti cogs go, I've ridden an SRP 12-30 for the last year and a
>half + and have not had a problem with undue wear or  a skipping chain. I
>keep my bike in excellent shape, so I can't tell you what happens if you
>just ride and never perform any maintenance. I liked the fact that you
>can get different combinations than the stock Shimano offerings. I can't
>tell if they are any better or not, they just do their job and don't
>cause any fuss. I hope that helps.

Nick, did you order a custom tooth combination from SRP, or just one of
*their* stock combinations.  I spoke w/ them the other day and was told I
could order any combination I wanted, but warned me that it may not shift as
well as a stock set since the hyperglide ramps won't be lined up "right".  I'd
like to go with a 12-13-14-16-18-20-22-24, same as my steel cogset.  Any
thoughts?

Bob

--
-----------------
Bob Lee