True/False: You can clean and lube your chain without removal _____

True/False: You can clean and lube your chain without removal _____

Post by Dan Musica » Thu, 17 Dec 1998 04:00:00


I have a 12 speed road bike and have always removed my chain before
cleaning and lubricating it.

I have another bike now with all Shimano components (Miyata
"One-Twelve") and have a few concerns:

1. I heard that some Shimano chains require a special tool and need to
be disassembled at a specific place. I don't know how to do this. How
can I tell if I have one of these chains?

2. I hear that taking off the chain weakens it, and if I can do the
whole thing without removing the chain (also a messy process, I've
found) that would be great.

Any tips appreciated...also suggestions for what to lube with.

Dan

 
 
 

True/False: You can clean and lube your chain without removal _____

Post by Adam Ri » Thu, 17 Dec 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

>I have a 12 speed road bike and have always removed my chain before
>cleaning and lubricating it.

>I have another bike now with all Shimano components (Miyata
>"One-Twelve") and have a few concerns:

>1. I heard that some Shimano chains require a special tool and need to
>be disassembled at a specific place. I don't know how to do this. How
>can I tell if I have one of these chains?

>2. I hear that taking off the chain weakens it, and if I can do the
>whole thing without removing the chain (also a messy process, I've
>found) that would be great.

>Any tips appreciated...also suggestions for what to lube with.

It is possible to clean a chain while on-bike (you can find little
doohickeys in the bike gear catalogs for just this purpose), but IMHO, it
is much more effective to remove the chain and soak it in some kind of
solvent (I've been using Simple Green lately). Chains need cleaning most
in the space hidden by the rollers, and you just can't get in there very
well with an on-bike cleaning (somebody somewhere commented that sticking
it in an ultrasonic cleaner really got the gunk out, but until they are
cheaper, I'm holding off).

Shimano wants you to use these special one-shot pins with their chains. My
solution to this inconvenience has been to avoid Shimano chains.

Breaking any chain does weaken it (which those special pins are meant to
address), but there is a nifty product called Craig's Superlink, which is
a special replacement link that allows you to open the chain with your
bare hands. This does not weaken the chain, and it makes chain removal
(and therefore cleaning) much easier. Sachs chains are now being sold with
something very similar, called a Powerlink. I'd suggest trying one of
these out and seeing if you like it.

As for lubes, this is a matter of some debate. I started using White
Lightning a while back, and I like it. This is a wax-based lube that
flakes off with use, so it keeps the chain cleaner but you need to apply
it more frequently. You also need to get any residual oil off your chain
before applying it for the first time. Other people might correctly point
out that WL is more expensive than other lubes. To put things in
perspective though, I have a $12 bottle that is half-empty after about one
year of use on four bikes. That works out to eight "bike-years" of use for
$12. Yes, there are cheaper solutions, but unless you are really, really
strapped for cash, the difference doesn't matter.


Austin TX USA | http://www.crossroads.net | XJ: Translation Jobs

 
 
 

True/False: You can clean and lube your chain without removal _____

Post by John Messie » Thu, 17 Dec 1998 04:00:00

    With the Chain cleaners available on the market today, it's a child's
play to clean your chain and lube it right on the bike.

    Just feed the chain through the brushes and the chain is routed
through the incorporated solvent bath.

    After you've cleaned it, just wipe it and let it dry before applying
the lube.

    Child's play.

JM

Quote:

> I have a 12 speed road bike and have always removed my chain before
> cleaning and lubricating it.

> I have another bike now with all Shimano components (Miyata
> "One-Twelve") and have a few concerns:

> 1. I heard that some Shimano chains require a special tool and need to
> be disassembled at a specific place. I don't know how to do this. How
> can I tell if I have one of these chains?

> 2. I hear that taking off the chain weakens it, and if I can do the
> whole thing without removing the chain (also a messy process, I've
> found) that would be great.

> Any tips appreciated...also suggestions for what to lube with.

> Dan


 
 
 

True/False: You can clean and lube your chain without removal _____

Post by Joshua_Putn » Thu, 17 Dec 1998 04:00:00


Quote:
>    With the Chain cleaners available on the market today, it's a child's
>play to clean your chain and lube it right on the bike.
>    Just feed the chain through the brushes and the chain is routed
>through the incorporated solvent bath.

After you've cleaned it, take it apart and notice how much
abrasive ***those pseudo-cleaner gizmos leave behind.  Unless
you repeat the cleaning process several times with fresh solvent
baths, all you're really doing is degreasing the outside of the
chain while washing grit into the rollers where it does the most
damage.

--

                       "My other bike is a car."                  
                     http://SportToday.org/~josh/

 
 
 

True/False: You can clean and lube your chain without removal _____

Post by Jeffrey J. Potof » Thu, 17 Dec 1998 04:00:00

Quote:



> >I have a 12 speed road bike and have always removed my chain before
> >cleaning and lubricating it.

> >I have another bike now with all Shimano components (Miyata
> >"One-Twelve") and have a few concerns:

> >1. I heard that some Shimano chains require a special tool and need to
> >be disassembled at a specific place. I don't know how to do this. How
> >can I tell if I have one of these chains?

> >2. I hear that taking off the chain weakens it, and if I can do the
> >whole thing without removing the chain (also a messy process, I've
> >found) that would be great.

> >Any tips appreciated...also suggestions for what to lube with.

> It is possible to clean a chain while on-bike (you can find little
> doohickeys in the bike gear catalogs for just this purpose), but IMHO, it
> is much more effective to remove the chain and soak it in some kind of
> solvent (I've been using Simple Green lately). Chains need cleaning most
> in the space hidden by the rollers, and you just can't get in there very
> well with an on-bike cleaning (somebody somewhere commented that sticking
> it in an ultrasonic cleaner really got the gunk out, but until they are
> cheaper, I'm holding off).

I've found that ridding in the rain does a nice job of cleaning a
chain.

Jeff

 
 
 

True/False: You can clean and lube your chain without removal _____

Post by Matt O'Tool » Thu, 17 Dec 1998 04:00:00

Quote:

>    With the Chain cleaners available on the market today, it's a child's
>play to clean your chain and lube it right on the bike.

>    Just feed the chain through the brushes and the chain is routed
>through the incorporated solvent bath.

>    After you've cleaned it, just wipe it and let it dry before applying
>the lube.

>    Child's play.

Chain cleaners do work, sort of.  They flex and brush the chain at the same
time, which probably does a better job than scrubbing by hand.  However,
they have one fatal flaw.  The fluid reservoir is way too small.  It fills
with gunk very quickly, so you wind up just flushing more dirt through the
rollers, maybe making things worse, not better.  You can do a really good
job with a chain cleaner, if you change the fluid several times, until it
runs clear.  You must also rinse off all traces of the water-based solvent
afterward, or your lube will be destroyed at the first puddle.  For me,
that's more trouble than it's worth.  Plus, chain cleaners are made of
brittle plastic, and don't last long.  You can't use petroleum-based
solvents in them, either.

Matt O.

 
 
 

True/False: You can clean and lube your chain without removal _____

Post by Lorenzo L. Lov » Thu, 17 Dec 1998 04:00:00

Quote:


> >    With the Chain cleaners available on the market today, it's a child's
> >play to clean your chain and lube it right on the bike.

> >    Just feed the chain through the brushes and the chain is routed
> >through the incorporated solvent bath.

> >    After you've cleaned it, just wipe it and let it dry before applying
> >the lube.

> >    Child's play.

> Chain cleaners do work, sort of.  They flex and brush the chain at the same
> time, which probably does a better job than scrubbing by hand.  However,
> they have one fatal flaw.  The fluid reservoir is way too small.  It fills
> with gunk very quickly, so you wind up just flushing more dirt through the
> rollers, maybe making things worse, not better.  You can do a really good
> job with a chain cleaner, if you change the fluid several times, until it
> runs clear.  You must also rinse off all traces of the water-based solvent
> afterward, or your lube will be destroyed at the first puddle.  For me,
> that's more trouble than it's worth.  Plus, chain cleaners are made of
> brittle plastic, and don't last long.  You can't use petroleum-based
> solvents in them, either.

> Matt O.

I have a Vetta chain cleaner that I been using for about 15 years with
kerosene. I do have to change the solvent at least three times, but that's
still quicker then removing the chain IF you don't have a Superlink. I recently
added a Superlink and that makes removing the chain for cleaning faster then
using the on-bike cleaner. In either case, kerosene does not need to rinsed off
like water-based solvents. I just let the chain air dry over night before
re-lubing. While kerosene is not recommeded as a skin lotion, it's not as hard
on the skin as some citrus water-based solvents which can peel your skin right
off. And at about $1.40 a gallon, you can't beat the price. I keep the dirty
kenosene for fire starting.

Lorenzo

 
 
 

True/False: You can clean and lube your chain without removal _____

Post by Tom Mihalc » Thu, 17 Dec 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

> I have a 12 speed road bike and have always removed my chain before
> cleaning and lubricating it.

> I have another bike now with all Shimano components (Miyata
> "One-Twelve") and have a few concerns:

> 1. I heard that some Shimano chains require a special tool and need to
> be disassembled at a specific place. I don't know how to do this. How
> can I tell if I have one of these chains?

> 2. I hear that taking off the chain weakens it, and if I can do the
> whole thing without removing the chain (also a messy process, I've
> found) that would be great.

> Any tips appreciated...also suggestions for what to lube with.

> Dan

I've used a Park chain cleaner with Castrol Super Clean.  I use the Park
chain cleaner because it also works on the tandem timing chain. Then I use
water in the chain cleaner. I lube the chain with a heat gun and paraffin
wax.  Make sure to heat the chain and melt the was with the hot chain so
the wax sweats into the chain.  The wax picks up very little dirt and most
of it comes out when the chain is waxed again.  I very seldom have to
reclean the chain.  

I replace the chain once a year since a Shimano chain let go and cost me
much skin.

--
Tom Mihalcik

 
 
 

True/False: You can clean and lube your chain without removal _____

Post by TC » Thu, 17 Dec 1998 04:00:00

I own about eight different bikes, I ride about 8 to 10K miles on the
road a year, I never take my chain off the bike unless it needs
replacement. Chain cleaning can always be done without the removal from
frame.
 
 
 

True/False: You can clean and lube your chain without removal _____

Post by S. Evan » Thu, 17 Dec 1998 04:00:00

Quote:


> >    With the Chain cleaners available on the market today, it's a child's
> >play to clean your chain and lube it right on the bike.

> >    Just feed the chain through the brushes and the chain is routed
> >through the incorporated solvent bath.

> >    After you've cleaned it, just wipe it and let it dry before applying
> >the lube.

> >    Child's play.

> Chain cleaners do work, sort of.  They flex and brush the chain at the same
> time, which probably does a better job than scrubbing by hand.  However,
> they have one fatal flaw.  The fluid reservoir is way too small.  It fills
> with gunk very quickly, so you wind up just flushing more dirt through the
> rollers, maybe making things worse, not better.  You can do a really good
> job with a chain cleaner, if you change the fluid several times, until it
> runs clear.  You must also rinse off all traces of the water-based solvent
> afterward, or your lube will be destroyed at the first puddle.  For me,
> that's more trouble than it's worth.  Plus, chain cleaners are made of
> brittle plastic, and don't last long.  You can't use petroleum-based
> solvents in them, either.

> Matt O.

Matt,
Are you saying that there is a residue left on that chain that when it
gets wet, will displace the oil on the chain?  I clean my chain with
some product from Finish Line, don't remember the name, let it dry, then
oil with what ever motor oil I happen to have for the cars.  I do not
mix the cleaner with waer, or rinse it off.  I ride to work two to three
times a week, sometimes in rain.  I haven't noticed the oil washing
away.  But the chain gets really black, quickly.  Of course, so do my
legs.
Steve Evans
 
 
 

True/False: You can clean and lube your chain without removal _____

Post by Stella Hacke » Thu, 17 Dec 1998 04:00:00

Riding in the rain leaves my chain clean on the outside, but full of grit.
Why doesn't that happen to yours?


Quote:

> I've found that ridding in the rain does a nice job of cleaning a
> chain.

> Jeff

--

Whom are you going to call?  GRAMMAR BUSTERS!!!

 
 
 

True/False: You can clean and lube your chain without removal _____

Post by Matt O'Tool » Thu, 17 Dec 1998 04:00:00

Quote:

>Matt,
>Are you saying that there is a residue left on that chain that when it
>gets wet, will displace the oil on the chain?  I clean my chain with
>some product from Finish Line, don't remember the name, let it dry, then
>oil with what ever motor oil I happen to have for the cars.  I do not
>mix the cleaner with waer, or rinse it off.  I ride to work two to three
>times a week, sometimes in rain.  I haven't noticed the oil washing
>away.  But the chain gets really black, quickly.  Of course, so do my
>legs.

It can wash away, and I've had it happen after using that same citrus stuff.
However, there's probably enough motor oil there to still provide
lubrication, especially if there's enough to make black marks on your legs.

Matt O.

 
 
 

True/False: You can clean and lube your chain without removal _____

Post by Nick Payn » Fri, 18 Dec 1998 04:00:00

I just clean it on the bike using some solvent in an old two litre icecream
container and a cheap paintbrush.

Nick

Quote:

>I have a 12 speed road bike and have always removed my chain before
>cleaning and lubricating it.

 
 
 

True/False: You can clean and lube your chain without removal _____

Post by Tadeusz Jerzy Korsa » Fri, 18 Dec 1998 04:00:00

Quote:

> Any tips appreciated...also suggestions for what to lube with.

In my Trek 6000 I have Sachs SC90 chain with Masterlink, so I can remove
the chain from bicycle with my bare hands. After removing, I use rag and
old toothbrush to brush away any debris and dirt. No solvents used. And
now, I'm*** the chain verticaly from the nail and after shaking
bootle of ?Finish Line Krytech for about minute, I apply a few drops
from top of the chain to the bottom. Such application needs e few hours
drying time and lasts about 100 km, and quality of lubrication improves
after a few applications. Krytech (or Teflon in it) needs time to grinds
itself into surface of metal. Cleaning bicycle, I use dishwasher liquid
and old toothbrush to clean chainrings with chain removed. No lube here!
Kind regards, Tadeusz
 
 
 

True/False: You can clean and lube your chain without removal _____

Post by Jon Isaa » Fri, 18 Dec 1998 04:00:00

I ride about 7k miles/year.  Ever since While Lightening came out, I just use
WL and when the chain is worn according to a gauge, I replace it.  The chain
seems to stay reasonably clean.

By the way, I don't know if anyone ever posted it, but there was a bad batch of
WL that was way to thick, my LBS will exchange partially used bottles for new
ones of the good stuff.

Also, someone gave a Christmas kit of White Lightening, bottle of red and
bottle of green.  Since I have three green bikes and 5 red bikes, to go along
with a white bike or two, now I can keep my chain lube color coordinated with
the paint and the unsightly waxy build up will no longer plague me.

Jon Isaacs