Mavic 230's

Mavic 230's

Post by Lynn Ril » Sun, 30 Jun 1996 04:00:00


I was recently checking out a problem with squealing rear brakes on my
Marin when I noticed the rim on my Mavic 230 was indented all the way
around where the brake pad hits it.  Has anyone had a similar problem?  
I've heard of freqeunt failure of the Mavic 230's, but not this.  I'm a
little leary of riding this bike now...  
 
 
 

Mavic 230's

Post by Char Ta » Sun, 30 Jun 1996 04:00:00


says...

Quote:
>I was recently checking out a problem with squealing rear brakes on my
>Marin when I noticed the rim on my Mavic 230 was indented all the way
>around where the brake pad hits it.  Has anyone had a similar problem?  
>I've heard of freqeunt failure of the Mavic 230's, but not this.  I'm a
>little leary of riding this bike now...  

        Time to replace the rim, buddy.  The 230's were notorious for having thin
sidewalls.  If you can already see the rim worn down from contact with the brake
pads, you might try to measure how thick the remaining sidewalls are.  I would
consider having the wheel rebuilt with something more durable like the ever so
popular 217.  I only run 230's up front and have a 217 in the back since I tend to
drag my rear brakes more.  Those were the good ol' days, when one could still
sacrifice durability for extra weight savings.  Truth is, I love my 230 up front, it's
stayed true longer than the 217 in back.  But then again, that's probably because I
have a suspension fork.  My next dream wheelbuild is a Chris King 28 hole front
hub and DT 15/17/15 either radial or 3-cross laced to a 217.  I'm just waiting for
my 230 to wear out.

 
 
 

Mavic 230's

Post by Dave Blak » Sun, 30 Jun 1996 04:00:00

Quote:

> I was recently checking out a problem with squealing rear brakes on my
> Marin when I noticed the rim on my Mavic 230 was indented all the way
> around where the brake pad hits it.  Has anyone had a similar problem?
> I've heard of freqeunt failure of the Mavic 230's, but not this.  I'm a
> little leary of riding this bike now...

See
http://www.keck.ucsf.edu/~dblake/fail.html and look at the rims section.
Mavic rims and the 230 in particular have a design flaw in their
sidewall construction. They will wear through and blow up your
tire when you least need it.

I would get a non-Mavic rim. I personally like Campy rims.

--
Dave Blake

http://www.keck.ucsf.edu/~dblake

 
 
 

Mavic 230's

Post by Matt O'Too » Sun, 30 Jun 1996 04:00:00


Quote:


>says...
>>I was recently checking out a problem with squealing rear brakes on my
>>Marin when I noticed the rim on my Mavic 230 was indented all the way
>>around where the brake pad hits it.  Has anyone had a similar problem?  
>>I've heard of freqeunt failure of the Mavic 230's, but not this.  I'm a
>>little leary of riding this bike now...  

>        Time to replace the rim, buddy.  The 230's were notorious for having
> thin
>sidewalls.  If you can already see the rim worn down from contact with the
> brake
>pads, you might try to measure how thick the remaining sidewalls are.  I would
>consider having the wheel rebuilt with something more durable like the ever so
>popular 217.  I only run 230's up front and have a 217 in the back since I tend
> to
>drag my rear brakes more.  Those were the good ol' days, when one could still
>sacrifice durability for extra weight savings.  Truth is, I love my 230 up
> front, it's
>stayed true longer than the 217 in back.  But then again, that's probably
> because I
>have a suspension fork.  My next dream wheelbuild is a Chris King 28 hole front

>hub and DT 15/17/15 either radial or 3-cross laced to a 217.  I'm just waiting
> for
>my 230 to wear out.

I've been riding a set of 230s for almost 2 years now.  Even
though they're definately showing signs of wear from
braking, they're still in great shape, and have only needing
truing once or twice.

I attribute the success I've had with these wheels to a few
things:

        They were built by someone who knows what he's
        doing.   I still firmly believe that most people    
        who build wheels, don't, and I don't care what kind
        of a rep they have or who they've built wheels for.

        I have a 7sp rear wheel, which I believe is a lot
        stronger than an overly dished 8sp.

        I have 32-36 spokes.   Removing 4 spokes only saves
        a half an ounce, and possibly makes the wheel a lot
        weaker, especially with such a light (and not as
        stiff) rim.

People keep harping on 230s, complaining of all kinds of
problems.  I think they were a great, lightweight product,
capable of long and reliable service, if used properly.  
They should never have ended up on production bikes with
dubious, machine-built wheels, with crappy, generic spokes.

Matt O.

 
 
 

Mavic 230's

Post by Ron Hea » Tue, 02 Jul 1996 04:00:00

 Matt:

I blew up 2 Mavic 230's when the sidewall spiraled out.  The wheels
were true.  Sidewall failure in this mode has
nothing to do with the spokes or the quality of the build.  The guy who
originally posted the bulging sidewall here is in trouble.  Just to prove
it, let's get him to wear a motorcycle helmet with a face shield and pump
his tire up to the max pressure posted on the tire.  I bet it blows...

Ron

 
 
 

Mavic 230's

Post by Steve Bottomle » Wed, 03 Jul 1996 04:00:00



Quote:
>I was recently checking out a problem with squealing rear brakes on my
>Marin when I noticed the rim on my Mavic 230 was indented all the way
>around where the brake pad hits it.  Has anyone had a similar problem?  
>I've heard of freqeunt failure of the Mavic 230's, but not this.  I'm a
>little leary of riding this bike now...  

While inflating rear tyre on a Mavic 230 to within max pressure the
entire bead blew off one side.  These rims have a high wear rate and I
had not thought to check regularly.  Talking to the guys at work, they
all have worn rims and hadn't been checking.  After the blow I switched
to a Mavic 217 which seems more robust (I weigh 230lbs so it needs to
be!).
My bike is in for Pace forks and Hope hydraulic discs at the moment but
I'm going to stick with a Mavic 230/217 combination.  Very expensive but
no more rim wear.
--
Steve Bottomley
 
 
 

Mavic 230's

Post by Dave Blak » Thu, 04 Jul 1996 04:00:00

Quote:

> ...  Talking to the guys at work, they
> all have worn rims and hadn't been checking.  After the blow I switched
> to a Mavic 217 which seems more robust (I weigh 230lbs so it needs to
> be!).
> My bike is in for Pace forks and Hope hydraulic discs at the moment but
> I'm going to stick with a Mavic 230/217 combination.  Very expensive but
> no more rim wear.

There is essentially no need to go to hydraulic discs because of your
weight. You do need to get a rim with an adequately designed sidewall.
I have seen guys much lighter than you wear through Mavic 230 rims. And
I have seen guys around your weight that have no problems with rim wear
and ride tons and tons - but not on Mavic rims.

The hydraulic disc decreases the radius of action and thus requires larger
applied forces to achieve the same amount of braking. Normal cantilevers
are adequate for very nearly all situations.

--
Dave Blake

http://www.keck.ucsf.edu/~dblake

 
 
 

Mavic 230's

Post by Steve Bottomle » Fri, 05 Jul 1996 04:00:00


writes

Quote:

>> ...  Talking to the guys at work, they
>> all have worn rims and hadn't been checking.  After the blow I switched
>> to a Mavic 217 which seems more robust (I weigh 230lbs so it needs to
>> be!).
>> My bike is in for Pace forks and Hope hydraulic discs at the moment but
>> I'm going to stick with a Mavic 230/217 combination.  Very expensive but
>> no more rim wear.

>There is essentially no need to go to hydraulic discs because of your
>weight. You do need to get a rim with an adequately designed sidewall.
>I have seen guys much lighter than you wear through Mavic 230 rims. And
>I have seen guys around your weight that have no problems with rim wear
>and ride tons and tons - but not on Mavic rims.

>The hydraulic disc decreases the radius of action and thus requires larger
>applied forces to achieve the same amount of braking. Normal cantilevers
>are adequate for very nearly all situations.

>The purpose of going over to discs is a reluctance to wear away that

which holds me up,  to shed loads of cash,  to stand out in a crowd,
and to experiment with new toys.  Weight may not be the problem but I
definitely slow down slowly?!.

My contacts tell me that V brakes are not all they're cracked up to be
and I currently have the disposable income to try something different so
I'll try discs and share the results.  

I still say watch the rims carefully and make your own judgements.

Component weight watchers could do well to look at their own personal
baggage to improve performance.
--
Steve Bottomley

 
 
 

Mavic 230's

Post by TBGi » Wed, 10 Jul 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>After being chased most of the way into an intersection by an
>inattentive driver rolling a stop sign, I have decided that I need a
>signaling device other than shouting insults.  Little 'tink-tink' bells
>won't get a driver's attention, but a boat-type air-horn may be
>overkill.  Anybody out there have experience with horns, either
>air-powered or electronic, that can alert a car that they're about to
>encounter a lycra speed bump?  Postings or direct e-mail appreciated.  

From my experience with autos with "loose nuts behind the wheel" a boat
type air horn IS NOT an overkill.  If you could get a water bottle cage
that mounts on the handle bars you would be in position to use it at a
moment's notice.  

Good Luck


 
 
 

Mavic 230's

Post by Allan Butl » Thu, 11 Jul 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>From my experience with autos with "loose nuts behind the wheel" a boat
>type air horn IS NOT an overkill.  If you could get a water bottle cage
>that mounts on the handle bars you would be in position to use it at a
>moment's notice.

        In the back of some of the bicycling magazines there is an airhorn
that is made for bicycling.  The air reservoir is placed in a bottle cage
and pumped up to as high as 150 psi.  The horn itself mounts on the
handlebar very quickly and easily.  It is rated at 120 dB and is called the
"Traffic Survival Kit".  

        Loud?  YUP!!!  It will definately be heard above traffic noise.  
Just limit exposure to it as it sets ones ears to ringing.

--
                                  Allan Butler KA0IES

                                  http://www.rf.org/farmers/ka0ies.html