Is Oxidation of NOS rims a cause for concern?

Is Oxidation of NOS rims a cause for concern?

Post by Steve Freide » Thu, 07 Jan 1999 04:00:00


I have a chance to try some NOS Fiamme Ergal tubular rims in both 28-
and 36-hole, but the person selling them says they're a little
"oxidized" in places.  To me, that means rust, and that could mean
serious compromise of the metal that's supposed to be between me and the
ground when I'm riding, and that makes me nervous!  I haven't seen them
for myself.

Is this the sort of thing where I could just take a bit of fine
sandpaper and get rid of it, presuming it's very light rust, and not
have any worries, or should I "just say 'no'" here?

I thought having the same rims in 28- and 36-hole configurations could
make for some interesting comparisons, and was thinking of building them
up with the same brand of hubs, possibly different spokes, and seeing
how they both held up.

Thanks in advance for your advice.

-S-

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Is Oxidation of NOS rims a cause for concern?

Post by Sheldon Brow » Thu, 07 Jan 1999 04:00:00

Quote:

> I have a chance to try some NOS Fiamme Ergal tubular rims in both 28-
> and 36-hole, but the person selling them says they're a little
> "oxidized" in places.  To me, that means rust, and that could mean
> serious compromise of the metal that's supposed to be between me and the
> ground when I'm riding, and that makes me nervous!  I haven't seen them
> for myself.

No, "rust" only happens on ferrous metals.  Aluminum oxidizes very
rapidly, but the oxide forms an impermeable coating, which prevents
oxygen from reaching the underlying metal.  Thus, oxidation of the
aluminum rim is only a cosmetic concern.

Quote:
> Is this the sort of thing where I could just take a bit of fine
> sandpaper and get rid of it, presuming it's very light rust, and not
> have any worries, or should I "just say 'no'" here?

Sandpaper would be overkill; at most, very fine steel wool would be
appropriate, but a paste-type aluminum polish would probably be better yet.

It is possible that there is rust on the eyelets...I can't remember
whether these were stainless or not on these excellent rims.

Quote:
> I thought having the same rims in 28- and 36-hole configurations could
> make for some interesting comparisons, and was thinking of building them
> up with the same brand of hubs, possibly different spokes, and seeing
> how they both held up.

I'd VERY highly recommend using the 28's on the front, 36's on the rear.
 This setup is considerably better all around than the ubiquitous 32/32 arrangement.

These rims, by the way, are better than anything currently in
production...they are not "museum pieces."

Sheldon "Used To Use One Of These In Back, With Even Lighter Nisi Track
Rim In Front" Brown
Newtonville, Massachusetts
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Is Oxidation of NOS rims a cause for concern?

Post by Philcycl » Thu, 07 Jan 1999 04:00:00

I can second Sheldon's comments about Ergal rims. I have several in use, some
for more than twenty years, and I weigh 210#.
Phil Brown

 
 
 

Is Oxidation of NOS rims a cause for concern?

Post by MAPaceBi » Thu, 07 Jan 1999 04:00:00

I hope you'll do the kind, decent, and responsible thing, and use the 28's as
fronts, and the 36's as rears. The fronts will still be stronger, unless you
manage to also make the rears nearly dishless.  If the eyelets are a little
rusty, just put a drop of oil between each *** and eyelet (like you should
anyway) and no one will even notice, and you can restore the original polish
very quickly with some Flitz, Simichrome, or Mother's (aluminum polishes).
Mark Pace
Quote:
>I have a chance to try some NOS Fiamme Ergal tubular rims in both 28-
>and 36-hole, but the person selling them says they're a little
>"oxidized" in places.  To me, that means rust, and that could mean
>serious compromise of the metal that's supposed to be between me and the
>ground when I'm riding, and that makes me nervous!  I haven't seen them
>for myself.

>Is this the sort of thing where I could just take a bit of fine
>sandpaper and get rid of it, presuming it's very light rust, and not
>have any worries, or should I "just say 'no'" here?

>I thought having the same rims in 28- and 36-hole configurations could
>make for some interesting comparisons, and was thinking of building them
>up with the same brand of hubs, possibly different spokes, and seeing
>how they both held up.

>Thanks in advance for your advice.

 
 
 

Is Oxidation of NOS rims a cause for concern?

Post by Jobst Bran » Thu, 07 Jan 1999 04:00:00

Quote:

> I have a chance to try some NOS Fiamme Ergal tubular rims in both
> 28- and 36-hole, but the person selling them says they're a little
> "oxidized" in places.  To me, that means rust, and that could mean
> serious compromise of the metal that's supposed to be between me and
> the ground when I'm riding, and that makes me nervous!  I haven't
> seen them for myself.

That may mean that the sockets and eyelets are rusty and that can't
be fixed easily without replacing them.  I don't know of anyone that
has such machinery except rim manufacturers.

Quote:
> Is this the sort of thing where I could just take a bit of fine
> sandpaper and get rid of it, presuming it's very light rust, and not
> have any worries, or should I "just say 'no'" here?

I would look at them and see if the structural integrity is
compromised by the "little oxidized" feature, especially if it is not
the exposed part of the eyelet but rather the socket, something that
is more cosmetic than functional.

Quote:
> I thought having the same rims in 28- and 36-hole configurations
> could make for some interesting comparisons, and was thinking of
> building them up with the same brand of hubs, possibly different
> spokes, and seeing how they both held up.

The problem with this is that even 24 spoke wheels work but have less
margin.  Unless you crash from a folded wheel, you'll not know whether
the wheel was strong enough.  These things are statistical and many
riders never exceed the limit.  That is why so many oddball wheels are
in vogue and no one knows how near the edge of a cliff they are.  I
don't think you will generate enough data to discern whether these
wheels are more or less durable than Rolf wheels, for instance.