Road brake levers and V-brakes

Road brake levers and V-brakes

Post by G.E.T » Tue, 13 Oct 1998 04:00:00


Is there a combo that will work?  I want to put drop bars on my
commuter/beater bike which has 1998 LX brakes.

Thanks, Greg


 
 
 

Road brake levers and V-brakes

Post by Jobst Bran » Tue, 13 Oct 1998 04:00:00

Quote:
Greg .E.T. writes:
> Is there a combo that will work?  I want to put drop bars on my
> commuter/beater bike which has 1998 LX brakes.

There is a converter called a "rollamajig" or the like that fits in
place of the curved cable tube.  It is a two diameter cable pulley
that corrects for the leverage of the road brake lever.



 
 
 

Road brake levers and V-brakes

Post by TBGi » Tue, 13 Oct 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

>Is there a combo that will work?  I want to put drop bars on my
>commuter/beater bike which has 1998 LX brakes.

There are two devices (at least) that make the two compatible.  One is the
"World Class V adaptor" and the other is the "Travel Agent."  I've never used
either.  



 
 
 

Road brake levers and V-brakes

Post by Alex Wetmor » Tue, 13 Oct 1998 04:00:00

Quote:

>Is there a combo that will work?  I want to put drop bars on my
>commuter/beater bike which has 1998 LX brakes.

Diacompe is supposed to have some levers called 287V which will work.  I
don't know if they are available through stores yet though, or just on new
bikes.

Otherwise you can get the Diacompe 287 (no V) and use them with Travel
Agents or World Class V-dapters.  I have this setup on two of my bikes and
it works well.  The setup will cost you about $90 though ($50-$60 for the
levers, $30-$40 for the V-dapters or Travel Agents).

alex

 
 
 

Road brake levers and V-brakes

Post by G.E.T » Tue, 13 Oct 1998 04:00:00

thanks for the tip.  i heard the travel agents work but that the world class
don't.
Quote:
>>Is there a combo that will work?  I want to put drop bars on my
>>commuter/beater bike which has 1998 LX brakes.

>Diacompe is supposed to have some levers called 287V which will work.  I
>don't know if they are available through stores yet though, or just on new
>bikes.

>Otherwise you can get the Diacompe 287 (no V) and use them with Travel
>Agents or World Class V-dapters.  I have this setup on two of my bikes and
>it works well.  The setup will cost you about $90 though ($50-$60 for the
>levers, $30-$40 for the V-dapters or Travel Agents).

 
 
 

Road brake levers and V-brakes

Post by G.E.T » Tue, 13 Oct 1998 04:00:00

Quote:

>>Is there a combo that will work?  I want to put drop bars on my
>>commuter/beater bike which has 1998 LX brakes.

>There are two devices (at least) that make the two compatible.  One is the
>"World Class V adaptor" and the other is the "Travel Agent."  I've never
used
>either.

I did a little research and the word I've seen is that the world class is
worthless.  The travel agent doubles the cable travel and seems to work ok.
It looks like a combo of the two would be great.
 
 
 

Road brake levers and V-brakes

Post by Mark Atanowi » Tue, 13 Oct 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

> Is there a combo that will work?  I want to put drop bars on my
> commuter/beater bike which has 1998 LX brakes.

Dia Compe makes a long travel lever and there are gizmos that you can
attached to the brakes to decrease leverage.  I've had no problems,
though, running Ergos and canti's without these.  I just need to run
the pads a bit closer to the rim.  My biggest issue was the lack of
adjustment which I recently solved with some barrel adjusters that fit
between the cables and cable stops.  You can find them at:

http://members.aol.com/Buildhpv/brazeons/brazeons.html

Mark Atanowicz

 
 
 

Road brake levers and V-brakes

Post by Mike Prybel » Tue, 13 Oct 1998 04:00:00

Actually they are called "Travel Agents".   They are made by Quality Bike
products, and they work, but not as good as a dedicated V brake lever.

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Quote:

>Greg .E.T. writes:

>> Is there a combo that will work?  I want to put drop bars on my
>> commuter/beater bike which has 1998 LX brakes.

>There is a converter called a "rollamajig" or the like that fits in
>place of the curved cable tube.  It is a two diameter cable pulley
>that corrects for the leverage of the road brake lever.



 
 
 

Road brake levers and V-brakes

Post by Paul Kop » Wed, 14 Oct 1998 04:00:00

DiaCompe 287V levers.

Quote:

>Is there a combo that will work?  I want to put drop bars on my
>commuter/beater bike which has 1998 LX brakes.

>Thanks, Greg




 
 
 

Road brake levers and V-brakes

Post by Alex Wetmor » Wed, 14 Oct 1998 04:00:00

Quote:

>I did a little research and the word I've seen is that the world class is
>worthless.  The travel agent doubles the cable travel and seems to work ok.
>It looks like a combo of the two would be great.

I disagree that the V-dapter is worthless.  First of all, on some bikes its
the only option (the Travel Agent gets in the way of the rack mounting
brazeons on my touring bike).  Second, I notice no difference in these
adapters (and I should be able to tell easily, since I have one of each
adapter on each of my bikes with V-brakes).  In some ways I prefer the
V-dapter.  The Travel Agent has a space between the pulley and holder which
can accumulate grit and dirt and reduce braking performance.  The V-dapter
has a wide open space with an open bottom in which nothing acculmulates.  I
also find the V-dapter to be simpler to setup.  The main problem with the
V-dapter is that it uses two oddly sized set screws, and if you lost just
one of them then you'd be SOL.

alex

 
 
 

Road brake levers and V-brakes

Post by G.E.T » Wed, 14 Oct 1998 04:00:00

Quote:
>>I did a little research and the word I've seen is that the world class is
>>worthless.  The travel agent doubles the cable travel and seems to work
ok.
>>It looks like a combo of the two would be great.

>I disagree that the V-dapter is worthless.  First of all, on some bikes its
>the only option (the Travel Agent gets in the way of the rack mounting
>brazeons on my touring bike).  Second, I notice no difference in these
>adapters (and I should be able to tell easily, since I have one of each
>adapter on each of my bikes with V-brakes).  In some ways I prefer the
>V-dapter.  The Travel Agent has a space between the pulley and holder which
>can accumulate grit and dirt and reduce braking performance.  The V-dapter
>has a wide open space with an open bottom in which nothing acculmulates.  I
>also find the V-dapter to be simpler to setup.  The main problem with the
>V-dapter is that it uses two oddly sized set screws, and if you lost just
>one of them then you'd be SOL.

Thank you very much for the info.  Since the V-dapter seems simpler, I would
definitely prefer it.  I really would like to see the diacompe 287Vs,
though.

thanks, Greg

 
 
 

Road brake levers and V-brakes

Post by G.T. » Fri, 16 Oct 1998 04:00:00

Quote:
>> >> Is there a combo that will work?  I want to put drop bars on my
>> >> commuter/beater bike which has 1998 LX brakes.

>> >There is a converter called a "rollamajig" or the like that fits in
>> >place of the curved cable tube.  It is a two diameter cable pulley
>> >that corrects for the leverage of the road brake lever.


>Correct: the Rollamajig doesn't change the mechanical advantage of the
>system, which is what is required to match road levers and V-brakes. I
>thought Jobst was always right :-)

He must be talking about the Travel Agent since it has the two diameter
cable pulley.

Quote:
>Vdapter vs Travel Agent:
>Travel Agent seems the best from an engineering standpoint but it looks
>complicated.  I think you have to crimp the cable to get it in there, which
>means you must get it right the first time you install. Great name though.

>V-dapter:  I use 'em on my 'cross bike and they are very nice. Simple,
>elegant and they have a feature I really like which is if you set 'em up
>right they have decreasing rate, which means they move the brake fast in
the
>initial part of the travel to take up slack quickly, then move it slowly in
>the latter part of the travel for greater force. The net is that you can
run
>the pads farther off the rim than with regular road levers, critical for
CX.
>Now if I could just find a mud boot for them.

 
 
 

Road brake levers and V-brakes

Post by Jobst Bran » Fri, 16 Oct 1998 04:00:00

Quote:
Dave Carr writes:
>> There is a converter called a "rollamajig" or the like that fits in
>> place of the curved cable tube.  It is a two diameter cable pulley
>> that corrects for the leverage of the road brake lever.
> Correct: the Rollamajig doesn't change the mechanical advantage of
> the system, which is what is required to match road levers and
> V-brakes. I thought Jobst was always right :-)

I inspected the device at our local bike shop and asked the manager
what its name was.  I should be less trusting of bike shop info.  Can
I take it as fact that the two diameter roller for the brake cable is
called a "Travel agent" or is it a Vdapter?  I use caliper brakes and
don't have any experience with any of these devices.

Quote:
> Travel Agent seems the best from an engineering standpoint but it
> looks complicated.  I think you have to crimp the cable to get it in
> there, which means you must get it right the first time you install.
> Great name though.

If this is the wheel I am talking about, it isn't complicated at all.
You thread it through and pull the wire into the slot when you have
the length correct to reach the other lever.

Quote:
> V-dapter: I use 'em on my 'cross bike and they are very nice.
> Simple, elegant and they have a feature I really like which is if
> you set 'em up right they have decreasing rate, which means they
> move the brake fast in the initial part of the travel to take up
> slack quickly, then move it slowly in the latter part of the travel
> for greater force. The net is that you can run the pads farther off
> the rim than with regular road levers, critical for CX.  Now if I
> could just find a mud boot for them.

Now you have my curiosity up.  Another variable ratio brake?  How do
you keep its high and low ratio where you theoretically want it as the
pads wear?  This has been the undoing of all the other variable ratio
brakes that have come and gone.


 
 
 

Road brake levers and V-brakes

Post by Alex Wetmor » Fri, 16 Oct 1998 04:00:00

Quote:

>I inspected the device at our local bike shop and asked the manager
>what its name was.  I should be less trusting of bike shop info.  Can
>I take it as fact that the two diameter roller for the brake cable is
>called a "Travel agent" or is it a Vdapter?  I use caliper brakes and
>don't have any experience with any of these devices.

That is the "Travel Agent".  You can see (not great) pictures of both
devices on my homepage at http://SportToday.org/~alex/bikes.html.  The
V-dapter is a pulley with an eccentric hole.

Quote:
>> Travel Agent seems the best from an engineering standpoint but it
>> looks complicated.  I think you have to crimp the cable to get it in
>> there, which means you must get it right the first time you install.
>> Great name though.

>If this is the wheel I am talking about, it isn't complicated at all.
>You thread it through and pull the wire into the slot when you have
>the length correct to reach the other lever.

It is a bit complicated to get the cable through, across a sharp turn (where
it goes onto the outer section of the pulley) then through the rest of the
Travel Agent (this is actually the hardest part for me... usually I bend the
cable a little bit with needle nose plyers to make it follow the curve
through the rest of the Travel Agent.

Quote:
>> V-dapter: I use 'em on my 'cross bike and they are very nice.
>> Simple, elegant and they have a feature I really like which is if
>> you set 'em up right they have decreasing rate, which means they
>> move the brake fast in the initial part of the travel to take up
>> slack quickly, then move it slowly in the latter part of the travel
>> for greater force. The net is that you can run the pads farther off
>> the rim than with regular road levers, critical for CX.  Now if I
>> could just find a mud boot for them.

>Now you have my curiosity up.  Another variable ratio brake?  How do
>you keep its high and low ratio where you theoretically want it as the
>pads wear?  This has been the undoing of all the other variable ratio
>brakes that have come and gone.

The V-dapter uses an eccentric pulley with the short end of the pulley
(closest the pivot point) up.  As you pull on the cable this begins by
moving a lot of cable (since the cable from the brakes is wrapping around
the large end of the pulley) and the amount decreases as you keep going.
I've never tried to measure this effect to see how big it is.

To adjust for worn brake pads you move a stop on the the cable (where the
noodle is on normal V-brakes).  This doesn't involve changing the cable
mounting on the pulley, so nothing really changes with regards to the brake
geometry.

If you use barrel connectors (I don't, but probably should) then by
adjusting the barrel connector you'd***up the orientation of the
eccentric pulley in the normal state and you'd have to readjust it (in
normal usage the set***on the pulley should be in the 3 o'clock
position, and you'd be changing this with the barrel adjustment).  Moving
the stopper is pretty simple (but does require a 2mm allen wrench) so I
haven't missed the barrel adjusters yet.

alex