New Book "Traffic Life"

New Book "Traffic Life"

Post by Stephan Wehn » Fri, 13 Feb 2004 02:39:11


You may be interested in this new book that I have put together called

 Traffic Life: Passionate Tales and Exit Strategies

It is an anthology with short stories, poems, cartoons and lots
of other art by 40 contributors (notably, Ray Bradbury and Harlan
Ellison) from around the world. The theme is the problems of traffic
and car culture.

Alternatives are covered, with cycling coming out at the top.

Most of the contents are available online at

 www.trafficlife.com

For example: The poem 'Buscrunch' at http://www.trafficlife.com/page38.html

Stephan Wehner

 
 
 

New Book "Traffic Life"

Post by Dane Jackso » Fri, 13 Feb 2004 02:50:39

Quote:

> You may be interested in this new book that I have put together called
>  Traffic Life: Passionate Tales and Exit Strategies
> It is an anthology with short stories, poems, cartoons and lots
> of other art by 40 contributors (notably, Ray Bradbury and Harlan
> Ellison) from around the world. The theme is the problems of traffic
> and car culture.
> Alternatives are covered, with cycling coming out at the top.
> Most of the contents are available online at
>  www.trafficlife.com

Looks interesting, the first story was amusing.  One comment, the
resources collection would be much better as a list instead of just an
aggregation of links jumbled up together.

--

To err is human,
To purr feline.
                -- Robert Byrne

 
 
 

New Book "Traffic Life"

Post by Stephan Wehn » Fri, 13 Feb 2004 08:36:26

Quote:

> Looks interesting, the first story was amusing.  One comment, the
> resources collection would be much better as a list instead of just an
> aggregation of links jumbled up together.

Granted! Improvement of that page is planned.

Stephan

 
 
 

New Book "Traffic Life"

Post by Doug Haxto » Sat, 14 Feb 2004 01:08:40



Quote:
>You may be interested in this new book that I have put together called

> Traffic Life: Passionate Tales and Exit Strategies

>It is an anthology with short stories, poems, cartoons and lots
>of other art by 40 contributors (notably, Ray Bradbury and Harlan
>Ellison) from around the world. The theme is the problems of traffic
>and car culture.

Unless the price of oil quadruples, you aren't going to be able to
persuade a significant portion of the population to abandon their
cars.

Come to think of it, it might take more than that.  Gas prices in
Europe approach that, and I saw an awful lot of cars in London,
Florence, and Zurich last year.

Even if the price of oil does skyrocket, there will be alternatives.
Hybrid cars already get 50+ mpg, and are quite practical...unlike pure
electrics.  

By the way, I flipped through the book...you seem to be simply
preaching to the choir.  Much, if not most of the content seems to be
fringe econuts ranting about how oppressed they are.

You do realize that none of the "solutions" proposed has the slightest
chance of actually being adopted, don't you?

Doug

 
 
 

New Book "Traffic Life"

Post by Dane Jackso » Sat, 14 Feb 2004 04:42:53

Quote:



>>You may be interested in this new book that I have put together called

>> Traffic Life: Passionate Tales and Exit Strategies

>>It is an anthology with short stories, poems, cartoons and lots
>>of other art by 40 contributors (notably, Ray Bradbury and Harlan
>>Ellison) from around the world. The theme is the problems of traffic
>>and car culture.
> Unless the price of oil quadruples, you aren't going to be able to
> persuade a significant portion of the population to abandon their
> cars.

Actually I would imagine the curve would look like smoking price
increases.  First you see some small percentage of people cut down,
and an even smaller percentage quit.  As the cost increases you see
more people limiting their usage, and an increasing (but smaller) amount
of people no longer smoking/driving.

Even if gas cost 25 times as much, I guarantee you would still see some
people driving.  But there would be quite a few less of them, and they
would be viewed differently by society.

--

"Ubi non accusator, ibi non judex."

(Where there is no police, there is no speed limit.)
                -- Roman Law, trans. Petr Beckmann (1971)

 
 
 

New Book "Traffic Life"

Post by Doug Haxto » Sat, 14 Feb 2004 08:16:10



Quote:



>>>You may be interested in this new book that I have put together called

>>> Traffic Life: Passionate Tales and Exit Strategies

>>>It is an anthology with short stories, poems, cartoons and lots
>>>of other art by 40 contributors (notably, Ray Bradbury and Harlan
>>>Ellison) from around the world. The theme is the problems of traffic
>>>and car culture.

>> Unless the price of oil quadruples, you aren't going to be able to
>> persuade a significant portion of the population to abandon their
>> cars.

>Actually I would imagine the curve would look like smoking price
>increases.  First you see some small percentage of people cut down,
>and an even smaller percentage quit.  As the cost increases you see
>more people limiting their usage, and an increasing (but smaller) amount
>of people no longer smoking/driving.

Makes sense.  You'd have to raise prices a *lot*, though.  I wouldn't
drive one bit less if gas was twice as expensive, and I suspect 90%+
of people would do the same.

Quadruple it and I'll drive (somewhat) less.

Quote:

>Even if gas cost 25 times as much, I guarantee you would still see some
>people driving.  But there would be quite a few less of them, and they
>would be viewed differently by society.

Ok, at $35 a gallon, I'll grant your point :-)

Doug

 
 
 

New Book "Traffic Life"

Post by Mitch Hale » Sat, 14 Feb 2004 09:37:42

Quote:

> Makes sense.  You'd have to raise prices a *lot*, though.  I wouldn't
> drive one bit less if gas was twice as expensive, and I suspect 90%+
> of people would do the same.

Probably because the typical cost of having a car far exceeds the
cost of using it. Anybody sinking over $500 a month into payments
and insurance isn't going to quit driving because the fuel costs
$200 a month. Those driving 15mpg trucks might request that the
government do something to lower the cost of their poor decision.
Like maybe drilling and consuming the remaining oil in Alaska.
We'll be less dependent on foreign oil when that's gone, just
ask some of the Republicans.  
Mitch.
 
 
 

New Book "Traffic Life"

Post by Doug Haxto » Sat, 14 Feb 2004 10:36:30



Quote:

>> Makes sense.  You'd have to raise prices a *lot*, though.  I wouldn't
>> drive one bit less if gas was twice as expensive, and I suspect 90%+
>> of people would do the same.

>Probably because the typical cost of having a car far exceeds the
>cost of using it. Anybody sinking over $500 a month into payments
>and insurance isn't going to quit driving because the fuel costs
>$200 a month.

Quite true.  Make it $400/month for gas, and I'll drive less.  I might
even purchase a more fuel-efficient vehicle for some trips...but stop
driving altogether?  No way.  Not unless it's even more expensive.

Quote:
>Those driving 15mpg trucks might request that the
>government do something to lower the cost of their poor decision.
>Like maybe drilling and consuming the remaining oil in Alaska.

Well, it's not like it's doing anyone any good when it's in the
ground...

Quote:
>We'll be less dependent on foreign oil when that's gone, just
>ask some of the Republicans.  

If you ask this Republican, I'll make the following forecast:  As long
as foreign oil is inexpensive, we'll be dependent on it, and why
shouldn't we be?   Why use up our oil when someone else is willing to
sell us theirs so cheaply?

Oh, sure, it'll eventually dry up...at some indeterminate point
decades (at least) in the future.   It won't happen overnight, though.
As the price slowly goes up, the market will find alternatives.

In the meantime, it's cheaper than bottled water, so start your
engines!

Doug

 
 
 

New Book "Traffic Life"

Post by Mitch Hale » Sat, 14 Feb 2004 21:13:00

Quote:

> If you ask this Republican, I'll make the following forecast:  As long
> as foreign oil is inexpensive, we'll be dependent on it, and why
> shouldn't we be?   Why use up our oil when someone else is willing to
> sell us theirs so cheaply?

Exactly. That's why it made no sense when Bush was talking about
"reducing our dependence".
When OPEC can't supply us, then we can give up our dependence on foreign
oil. That seems to be a major problem with Bin Laden, he thinks we're
gobbling up the Arab world's natural resources. When you look at world
oil consumption, he's got a point. USA - 20 million barrels per day,
China's in 2nd place with 5 million, Japan recently dropped to third
place with 5 million... I was surprised to find out we still burn four
times as much as China when we have 10% of China's population. If the
US military were counted as a separate country, I wonder where it would
rank on the list.
Mitch.
 
 
 

New Book "Traffic Life"

Post by Doug Haxto » Sun, 15 Feb 2004 00:17:16



Quote:

>> If you ask this Republican, I'll make the following forecast:  As long
>> as foreign oil is inexpensive, we'll be dependent on it, and why
>> shouldn't we be?   Why use up our oil when someone else is willing to
>> sell us theirs so cheaply?

>Exactly. That's why it made no sense when Bush was talking about
>"reducing our dependence".
>When OPEC can't supply us, then we can give up our dependence on foreign
>oil. That seems to be a major problem with Bin Laden, he thinks we're
>gobbling up the Arab world's natural resources.

That's because oil is all that the Arab world produces.  Their other
industries are insignificant.  I recall someone pointing out recently
that the combined GDP of every Arab country is roughly equivalent to
that of Spain.

Quote:
> When you look at world
>oil consumption, he's got a point. USA - 20 million barrels per day,
>China's in 2nd place with 5 million, Japan recently dropped to third
>place with 5 million... I was surprised to find out we still burn four
>times as much as China when we have 10% of China's population.

I'm not.  Per capita ownership of automobiles is something like 2.0 in
the US, IIRC.  What is it in China.... 0.1?

Quote:
>If the US military were counted as a separate country, I wonder where it would
>rank on the list.

Rather low, I suspect.  While our Armed Forces burn a lot of gas, so
do the entire countries of France, Great Britain, Sweden, etc.

Doug

 
 
 

New Book "Traffic Life"

Post by Robert Hasto » Mon, 16 Feb 2004 03:05:47

Or the laws of thermodynamics will prove more challenging than the PR people
in the energy and auto industries want us to believe, and we will have to
get by using about 10% of the energy we do now.  Not that that couldn't be
as good (or better) life.  Part of the insanity of our society is everyone
zipping around like Chihuahuas on speed.

Although I think burning fossil fuel 3 million times faster than our planet
made it is a disgrace, one must consider that if we weren't burning it now
in our hummers, we would be burning it later in bulldozers and chainsaws.


Quote:

> Oh, sure, it'll eventually dry up...at some indeterminate point
> decades (at least) in the future.   It won't happen overnight, though.
> As the price slowly goes up, the market will find alternatives.
> Doug

 
 
 

New Book "Traffic Life"

Post by Scott Eile » Tue, 17 Feb 2004 07:59:37

Quote:

> Although I think burning fossil fuel 3 million times faster than our planet
> made it is a disgrace, one must consider that if we weren't burning it now
> in our hummers, we would be burning it later in bulldozers and chainsaws.

Your point is well taken, but *right now* (4:56 pm United States Central
Standard Time, Sunday 15 February 2003) on TV (the Weather Channel) I'm
watching an ad for a human-driven chainsaw.  Sure it's still a chainsaw,
but no gas!  And (proudly claimed by the ad) no start-up time!

If fossil fuel disappears, the tech *will* adapt.

--
-------- Scott Eiler  B{D> -------- http://www.eilertech.com/ --------

"It seemed an unlikely spot for a sensitive songwriter from Greenwich
Village... She ordered the 20-ounce steak."
-- Lin Brehmer, Chicago DJ, describing his meeting in a steakhouse
    with Suzanne Vega.

 
 
 

New Book "Traffic Life"

Post by Robert Hasto » Tue, 17 Feb 2004 11:15:58

I can't see much of anything improving on the one man bucksaw/bowsaw with
its very thin blade, or the two man whipsaw.  Chainsaws have to cut 2-4
times more width, if not more.

I guess it is all a bunch of hot air until the end of cheap oil arrives.  It
will be interesting to say the least.


Quote:

> > Although I think burning fossil fuel 3 million times faster than our
planet
> > made it is a disgrace, one must consider that if we weren't burning it
now
> > in our hummers, we would be burning it later in bulldozers and
chainsaws.

> Your point is well taken, but *right now* (4:56 pm United States Central
> Standard Time, Sunday 15 February 2003) on TV (the Weather Channel) I'm
> watching an ad for a human-driven chainsaw.  Sure it's still a chainsaw,
> but no gas!  And (proudly claimed by the ad) no start-up time!

> If fossil fuel disappears, the tech *will* adapt.

> --
> -------- Scott Eiler  B{D> -------- http://www.eilertech.com/ --------

> "It seemed an unlikely spot for a sensitive songwriter from Greenwich
> Village... She ordered the 20-ounce steak."
> -- Lin Brehmer, Chicago DJ, describing his meeting in a steakhouse
>     with Suzanne Vega.

 
 
 

New Book "Traffic Life"

Post by Doug Haxto » Tue, 17 Feb 2004 11:51:01



Quote:

>> Although I think burning fossil fuel 3 million times faster than our planet
>> made it is a disgrace, one must consider that if we weren't burning it now
>> in our hummers, we would be burning it later in bulldozers and chainsaws.

>Your point is well taken, but *right now* (4:56 pm United States Central
>Standard Time, Sunday 15 February 2003) on TV (the Weather Channel) I'm
>watching an ad for a human-driven chainsaw.  Sure it's still a chainsaw,
>but no gas!  And (proudly claimed by the ad) no start-up time!

>If fossil fuel disappears, the tech *will* adapt.

There's a novel coming out later this year called "Dies the Fire" by
one of my favorite authors, S. M. Stirling, in which electricity stops
going through wires, gunpowder stops working, and even steam engines
won't work.

http://hem.bredband.net/b104699/books/dies/dies_cv.html

I gather that someone like 99% of humanity dies in the first few
months.

Doug

 
 
 

New Book "Traffic Life"

Post by Robert Hasto » Wed, 18 Feb 2004 12:22:12

Having served in Iraq twice, and having an oil engineer uncle, I don't see
the military cost as mandatory.  I see the oil as more of an excuse for a
bigger military rather than the oil itself needs defending.

There are lots of cheaper options the powers that be don't want (such as
pipeline instead of tankers) - especially considering that we get 12% of our
oil from the middle east (Japan and Korea get 75%).

1.  Stockpile 24% of our annual consumption (2,000 gallons per capita).
2.  Buy long-term oil contract from those we get 36% from.

If there is an oil war, we make huge profits as our stockpiles, contracts,
and domestic oil value doubles.  Personally I think we need a public
uprising and spend our own money on it, while reducing consumption to lower
the cost.  Given that oil has outpaced inflation for 20 years now, it is
low-risk.

Anyway, there are lots of options, options you never see between car
commercials on TV.


Quote:

from

> >I guess it is all a bunch of hot air until the end of cheap oil arrives.

> It's already arrived. The price is kept artificially low in terms of money
paid
> per barrel. Factor in all the military spending to enforce a stable
supply, not
> to mention human lives lost in petroleum wars, then try to call it "cheap
oil."

> --

> Remove specifics and convert to ambiguities.
> 1