newbie - help with bike purchase

newbie - help with bike purchase

Post by Keith McDonal » Sat, 06 Apr 2002 22:48:53


Hi all,

I'm looking into a new bicycle purchase.  I used my mountain bike with road
tires to commute to work last year, and would like to upgrade to a real
roadbike for the summer.  Also, I am running a marathon soon, and am
interested in extending to duathalons/triathalons.  So this bike will be for
commuting, as well as potentially for racing (I'm not one who will be
winning these races, but just racing for the fun of it!).  My build it 6'
0'', around 210 lbs.  I seem to be settling on the Cannondale R700.  Is this
a good choice...does anyone have other suggestions for a person of my
build/needs?

Thanks for your help!
Keith

 
 
 

newbie - help with bike purchase

Post by Ken [N » Sun, 07 Apr 2002 03:23:37


breathlessly shared the following:

Quote:
>Hi all,

>I'm looking into a new bicycle purchase.  I used my mountain bike with road
>tires to commute to work last year, and would like to upgrade to a real
>roadbike for the summer.  Also, I am running a marathon soon, and am
>interested in extending to duathalons/triathalons.  So this bike will be for
>commuting, as well as potentially for racing (I'm not one who will be
>winning these races, but just racing for the fun of it!).  My build it 6'
>0'', around 210 lbs.  I seem to be settling on the Cannondale R700.  Is this
>a good choice...does anyone have other suggestions for a person of my
>build/needs?

>Thanks for your help!
>Keith

        I do a few duathlons each year, (run-bike-run,) and used to
compete in triathlons before getting frustrated with watching elderly
women beat me out of the water. (I am 61 and always was a weak
swimmer) I have a Canondale R500 that I have used in du's for a few
years, and it works well for that role if you like a stiff frame. Its
stiffness does not give me a really comfortable ride for commuting
though, so you might want to check out some titanium bikes. The R700
of course would be lighter with upgraded components. Racing is
***ive so if you get serious about it, later you might check out
bikes made specifically for tri's & du's. My R500 is equipped with
Syntace C2 Clip-on Aerobar, with bridge Aerolink, which is legal for
that kind of race. ($115) It is also great for those long commuter
trips when you want to coast down a hill in a tucked in position. Kids
and chicks love to make positive comments about it.  :-)
http://SportToday.org/
        Size: I am 6 foot even and 180-190, but don't remember what
size Canondale I bought. Best thing to do is take a test ride and let
the pro shop people help you with size and seat adjustments. Clipless
pedals are good but slow you a bit in transitions. I am probably going
to switch to Speedplay X Road Pedals, replacing the SPD's the bike
came with.
        Good luck,
   Ken (NY)
--
Chairbeing,
Department of Redundancy Department
Assistant Grand Poobah, Vast Right Wing ***
___________________________________

 
 
 

newbie - help with bike purchase

Post by Pbwalth » Tue, 09 Apr 2002 22:29:52

Quote:
>Hi all,

>I'm looking into a new bicycle purchase.  I used my mountain bike with road
>tires to commute to work last year, and would like to upgrade to a real
>roadbike for the summer.  Also, I am running a marathon soon, and am
>interested in extending to duathalons/triathalons.  So this bike will be for
>commuting, as well as potentially for racing (I'm not one who will be
>winning these races, but just racing for the fun of it!).  My build it 6'
>0'', around 210 lbs.  I seem to be settling on the Cannondale R700.  Is this
>a good choice...does anyone have other suggestions for a person of my
>build/needs?

>Thanks for your help!
>Keith

Well, Keith I am 6'0" tall and I ride a Cannondale R800 (I have 30,000 miles on
this bike).  Cannondales tend to be popular among clydesdales (cyclists
weighing more than 190) because of their stiff frames.  I am not sure what an
R700 has on it.  I generally like to go with Shimano 105 components which give
about 99% of the performance of Dura Ace (top of the line) for about 50% of the
cost.  I think R700 might be tiagra (the next notch down) but I am not sure.  

 
 
 

newbie - help with bike purchase

Post by Ken [N » Wed, 10 Apr 2002 01:08:56


Quote:
>>Thanks for your help!
>>Keith

>Well, Keith I am 6'0" tall and I ride a Cannondale R800 (I have 30,000 miles on
>this bike).  Cannondales tend to be popular among clydesdales (cyclists
>weighing more than 190) because of their stiff frames.

        There is a lot more involved besides the weight of the rider.
A stiff frame also allows for instant power application. More flexible
frames "store" some torque before release. Matter of taste, I guess.

Torsional/lateral stiffness
This is mainly related to the stresses generated by the forces you
create from pedaling. Any frame will flex around the bottom bracket a
bit in response to pedaling loads. This flex can be felt, and many
riders assume that it is consuming (wasting) pedaling effort.
Actually, that's not the case, because the metals used in bicycle
frames are very efficient springs, and the energy gets returned at the
end of the power stroke, so little or nothing is actually lost. While
there is no actual loss of efficiency from a "flexy" frame, most
cyclists find the sensation unpleasant, and prefer a frame that is
fairly stiff in the drive-train area. This is more of a concern for
larger, heavier riders, and for those who make a habit of standing up
to pedal.
Another area where lateral stiffness can be an issue particularly to
the touring cyclist is the rear triangle, when there's a touring load
on the rear rack. An frame that is too flexy in this area will feel
"whippy" and may be prone to dangerous oscillations at high speeds.
Most of this flex is usually in the luggage rack itself, but there can
be enough flex in the seat stays to aggravate this condition.
http://www.sheldonbrown.com/frame-materials.html

        Cordially,
   Ken (NY)
--
Chairbeing,
Department of Redundancy Department
___________________________________
Too often we lose sight of life's simple pleasures. Remember,
when somebody annoys you, it takes 42 muscles in your face
to frown. But it only takes 4 muscles to extend your arm and