Throatlatches, Founder, Sick Foal & Ride & Stuff

Throatlatches, Founder, Sick Foal & Ride & Stuff

Post by Dr Corinne B Lee » Sat, 22 May 2010 08:02:18


1.  Throatlatches: how tight do you do them?  I was always taught to
have 4 finger widths loose.  If I do that, I can take Axel's bridle
off, no problem.

2.  One of the 4 mares Jen had foal this Spring has a light founder in
the front.  Jen says it's a result of the foaling not the grass.  The
mare is well taped and padded on the front and moves off easy, just
clunks on the padding when she steps under.

3.  The foal of another mare is seeming to improve a bit.  They were
out in the field to get the foal to move around and maybe nurse more.
She's had an infection of unknown origin and wasn't nursing or
pooping.  She's been sick since the weekend.  Poor thing.
As I said to Jen, it's never easy, when it comes to foaling time (or
horses in general)!

4.  Axel doesn't like his grazing muzzle and is a good Houdini with
it.  Hey, if there's food, don't get between him and the food!  LOL!
He's back to Mr FattyLumpkins, although he's actually fitter.  But he
is just too easy a keeper.  So he's being pulled off the grass sooner
than his cohorts.  I left him in his stall when I left today.  He was
"You're kidding, right?  There's no food here!" and called to his
buds.

5.  My ride was a lesson with Jen on Axel.  It concentrated very much
on me being truly balanced and weighted evenly in both stirrups.  Axel
was pretty good for me and he was going well.  I started to even up
and it was a good ride, even according to Jen.  She said I was really
beginning to look good once I sorted out "Weight that leg!".
I am so feeling so much better about my riding than I was even a year
ago.  :-))

6.  When I went out to get Axel, they were all in the furthest pasture
(good walk, good for cardio!) and it gave me a look at how buzzed down
the grass was on the front sections.  Man, can horses ever be
excellent buzz saws!  Made me wish I could have some natural buzzsaws
on my lawn....

Corinne & Cranky Crazy Canuck Crew...

--
*** Conserve Energy: Laughter is easier than Anger!

 
 
 

Throatlatches, Founder, Sick Foal & Ride & Stuff

Post by Eilee » Sat, 22 May 2010 11:21:36


Quote:
> 1. ?Throatlatches: how tight do you do them? ?I was always taught to
> have 4 finger widths loose. ?If I do that, I can take Axel's bridle
> off, no problem.

Depends on the horse; typically I do a fist. Belles wants more room
for her dressage bridle/dressage work, less for jumping and trail
riding, so she gets a***and thumb. Moonlight and Dancer get the
fist.

Quote:
> 2. ?One of the 4 mares Jen had foal this Spring has a light founder in
> the front. ?Jen says it's a result of the foaling not the grass. ?The
> mare is well taped and padded on the front and moves off easy, just
> clunks on the padding when she steps under.

Happens. If caught fast, I think it is easier to recover from than
grass founder, since they don't continue to have the trigger as an
ongoing issue.

Quote:
> 3. ?The foal of another mare is seeming to improve a bit. ?

Fingers and toes crossed.

Quote:
> 4. ?Axel doesn't like his grazing muzzle and is a good Houdini with
> it. ?Hey, if there's food, don't get between him and the food! ?LOL!
> He's back to Mr FattyLumpkins, although he's actually fitter. ?But he
> is just too easy a keeper. ?So he's being pulled off the grass sooner
> than his cohorts.

Belles and Baby are on the 2 hrs, 2x a day grazing diet. The rest of
the time they will be dry lotted.
The muzzle ate Belle's face.

Quote:
> 5. ?My ride was a lesson with Jen on Axel. ?It concentrated very much
> on me being truly balanced and weighted evenly in both stirrups. ?Axel
> was pretty good for me and he was going well.

Sounds productive!

Quote:
> I am so feeling so much better about my riding than I was even a year
> ago. ?:-))

> 6. ?When I went out to get Axel, they were all in the furthest pasture
> (good walk, good for cardio!) and it gave me a look at how buzzed down
> the grass was on the front sections. ?Man, can horses ever be
> excellent buzz saws! ?Made me wish I could have some natural buzzsaws
> on my lawn....

And I keep wishing I had more pasture! I mowed the middle field today.
I am hoping that the front field will last until middle June, by which
time I hope the small back field is ready to go. And then the middle
again.

Eileen Morgan
The Mare's Nest

 
 
 

Throatlatches, Founder, Sick Foal & Ride & Stuff

Post by Tom & Winnie Lin » Sat, 22 May 2010 21:18:05


Quote:

> 4.  Axel doesn't like his grazing muzzle and is a good Houdini with
> it.  Hey, if there's food, don't get between him and the food!  LOL!
> He's back to Mr FattyLumpkins, although he's actually fitter.  But he
> is just too easy a keeper.  So he's being pulled off the grass sooner
> than his cohorts.  I left him in his stall when I left today.  He was
> "You're kidding, right?  There's no food here!" and called to his
> buds.

The horses at my barn go out on grass for half the day and then are in
the bare fields with round bales for the other half.

Quote:
> 5.  My ride was a lesson with Jen on Axel.  It concentrated very much
> on me being truly balanced and weighted evenly in both stirrups.  Axel
> was pretty good for me and he was going well.  I started to even up
> and it was a good ride, even according to Jen.  She said I was really
> beginning to look good once I sorted out "Weight that leg!".
> I am so feeling so much better about my riding than I was even a year
> ago.  :-))

Great news, Corrine. It is good to read your happy riding posts.

Winnie

 
 
 

Throatlatches, Founder, Sick Foal & Ride & Stuff

Post by Dr Corinne B Lee » Sun, 23 May 2010 00:32:04



Quote:

>> 1. Throatlatches: how tight do you do them? I was always taught to
>> have 4 finger widths loose. If I do that, I can take Axel's bridle
>> off, no problem.

>Depends on the horse; typically I do a fist. Belles wants more room
>for her dressage bridle/dressage work, less for jumping and trail
>riding, so she gets a***and thumb. Moonlight and Dancer get the
>fist.

Fist = 4 finger widths for me.
I have small hands (long fingers).
But that bridle came off real easy.  Twice (on different days).

Quote:
>> 2. One of the 4 mares Jen had foal this Spring has a light founder in
>> the front. Jen says it's a result of the foaling not the grass. The
>> mare is well taped and padded on the front and moves off easy, just
>> clunks on the padding when she steps under.

>Happens. If caught fast, I think it is easier to recover from than
>grass founder, since they don't continue to have the trigger as an
>ongoing issue.

That's what I figured.

Quote:
>> 3. The foal of another mare is seeming to improve a bit.

>Fingers and toes crossed.

Yeah.  It's a cute thing with decent parents.  
Jen has a good eye for horseflesh and does well with her breeding.

Quote:
>> 4. Axel doesn't like his grazing muzzle and is a good Houdini with
>> it. Hey, if there's food, don't get between him and the food! LOL!
>> He's back to Mr FattyLumpkins, although he's actually fitter. But he
>> is just too easy a keeper. So he's being pulled off the grass sooner
>> than his cohorts.

>Belles and Baby are on the 2 hrs, 2x a day grazing diet. The rest of
>the time they will be dry lotted.

Poor Axel is going to get the Fat Farm again for a while each day, I
think.

Quote:
>The muzzle ate Belle's face.

Same thing was also happening with Axel.  He was exacerbating it by
rubbing the thing off, too.
Too bad those baskets are so heavy.

Quote:
>> 5. My ride was a lesson with Jen on Axel. It concentrated very much
>> on me being truly balanced and weighted evenly in both stirrups. Axel
>> was pretty good for me and he was going well.

>Sounds productive!

Thanks.  I think it was.
I spent some time in bed this morn, drowsing, and thinking of
weighting that leg.  =8-D  And trying to stand on that leg while
standing in the shower.
That may all sound funny, but it's had 6 knee surgeries and over the
injury time, I've probably actually spent a couple years or more
*avoiding* that leg.  It then becomes a visceral habit that's hard to
let go.  Even now.
So I have to really work at it.

Quote:
>> I am so feeling so much better about my riding than I was even a year
>> ago. :-))

>> 6. When I went out to get Axel, they were all in the furthest pasture
>> (good walk, good for cardio!) and it gave me a look at how buzzed down
>> the grass was on the front sections. Man, can horses ever be
>> excellent buzz saws! Made me wish I could have some natural buzzsaws
>> on my lawn....

>And I keep wishing I had more pasture! I mowed the middle field today.
>I am hoping that the front field will last until middle June, by which
>time I hope the small back field is ready to go. And then the middle
>again.

You wanna truck 'em on up here for a day or so?  LOL!
'Course, I'd need some goats to get the weeds, lots of weeds....

Corinne & Cranky Crazy Canuck Crew...

--
*** Conserve Energy: Laughter is easier than Anger!

 
 
 

Throatlatches, Founder, Sick Foal & Ride & Stuff

Post by Dr Corinne B Lee » Sun, 23 May 2010 00:32:40

On Fri, 21 May 2010 08:18:05 -0400, Tom & Winnie Lind

Quote:


>> 4.  Axel doesn't like his grazing muzzle and is a good Houdini with
>> it.  Hey, if there's food, don't get between him and the food!  LOL!
>> He's back to Mr FattyLumpkins, although he's actually fitter.  But he
>> is just too easy a keeper.  So he's being pulled off the grass sooner
>> than his cohorts.  I left him in his stall when I left today.  He was
>> "You're kidding, right?  There's no food here!" and called to his
>> buds.

>The horses at my barn go out on grass for half the day and then are in
>the bare fields with round bales for the other half.

Fat Farm for Axel for part of the day seems to be in his future.

Quote:
>> 5.  My ride was a lesson with Jen on Axel.  It concentrated very much
>> on me being truly balanced and weighted evenly in both stirrups.  Axel
>> was pretty good for me and he was going well.  I started to even up
>> and it was a good ride, even according to Jen.  She said I was really
>> beginning to look good once I sorted out "Weight that leg!".
>> I am so feeling so much better about my riding than I was even a year
>> ago.  :-))

>Great news, Corrine. It is good to read your happy riding posts.

Thanks.

Corinne & Cranky Crazy Canuck Crew...

--
*** Conserve Energy: Laughter is easier than Anger!

 
 
 

Throatlatches, Founder, Sick Foal & Ride & Stuff

Post by JC Dil » Sun, 23 May 2010 01:26:14


Quote:



>>> 1.  Throatlatches: how tight do you do them?  I was always taught to
>>> have 4 finger widths loose.  If I do that, I can take Axel's bridle
>>> off, no problem.
>> Depends on the horse; typically I do a fist. Belles wants more room
>> for her dressage bridle/dressage work, less for jumping and trail
>> riding, so she gets a***and thumb. Moonlight and Dancer get the
>> fist.
>***= 4 finger widths for me.

I never measure by using fingers.  I just buckle the throatlatch based
on its position versus the horse's throat!

Quote:
> I have small hands (long fingers).
> But that bridle came off real easy.  Twice (on different days).

How is the bridle coming off?  (Is it coming off by accident, or are you
forgetting to unbuckle the throatlatch and taking the bridle off while
the throatlatch is still buckled?)

The throatlatch should be:

1)  Loose enough that it doesn't interfere with flexing.  If it is too
tight and you ask the horse to flex to come "on the bit" with the face
vertical, and the throatlatch presses into the throat at this point, you
are fighting your tack and causing discomfort when you try to flex the
horse.

2)  No looser than necessary - see #1.

Horses that are thick in the throat need a looser throatlatch.  Horses
that are more refined in the throat can have it snugged up a bit more.

Horses that have a slender jaw but thick throat *may* need the
throatlatch loose enough that the bridle can be easily drawn over their
ears even when the throatlatch is properly adjusted.  This is why
eventers braid a bit of string into the horse's mane behind the crown
piece and tie the bridle to the horse's mane - the throatlatch may
simply not do the job as necessary if things go wonky on XC.  The
position of the throatlatch (and it's angle on the jaw) *may* improve
(help hold the bridle on better) if you change the browband to one that
is longer, or shorter, or thicker.

The nature of the horse's ears and bridle path also affect things.  If
the horse has a thick mane and no bridle path, and small ears, the
bridle is going to slide over those ears a lot more easily than a horse
with a thick mane AND a clipped bridle path (which leaves the crownpiece
of the bridle sitting closer to the neck, behind a big lump of forelock)
and who has big ears.  It also matters if the horse's ears are more on
top of their head, or a bit more to the side.

jc

 
 
 

Throatlatches, Founder, Sick Foal & Ride & Stuff

Post by Dr Corinne B Lee » Sun, 23 May 2010 09:02:15



Quote:
>Detailed stuff.<

Now **that's** helpful!!
Thank you!!!
That's the best explanation of the throatlatch I've ever
seen/heard/read.

I deliberately tried to take the bridle off while the throatlatch was
done up.  Came off easy both times.
So.
I shall have to check to see how the throat area does re: the leather.
More experiments!!!  <G>  
Tighter and how much without impinging....

Corinne & Cranky Crazy Canuck Crew...

--
*** Conserve Energy: Laughter is easier than Anger!