Riding a two year old.

Riding a two year old.

Post by Etsn Ger » Wed, 03 Apr 1996 04:00:00


I have been told that you may ride some horses at to years depending on there
developement.  Is this wrong?  If so can you start trying to put bareback pads
or light saddles untill the horses are ready for the weight of an ***?


 
 
 

Riding a two year old.

Post by CA.. » Thu, 04 Apr 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>I have been told that you may ride some horses at to years depending on there
>developement.  Is this wrong?  If so can you start trying to put bareback pads
>or light saddles untill the horses are ready for the weight of an ***?



Depending upon who you talk to, riding a two-year old can be wrong or right.
Many people on req.eq do not believe in riding two-year olds.  Fine - certainly
 can't hurt to wait to three.  My own personal experience, with my current
horse and past horses is that they were all started as two-year olds.  These
are quarter horses.  Actually they had lots of ground work, i.e., driving, some
 lunging, ponying, before age of two.  They were handled and saddled a lot
before being riden at two.  When riding did begin, it was a gradual process,
maybe 15 minutes per day for awhile - maybe only 10 min at a time twice a day
in the arena to accostom them to a riders weight and learning steering cues,
stop, walk.  As they became stronger and more proficient, the time of riding
increased.  By the end of their two-year old year they would be expected to
handle an hour or so.  They were also introduced to trail riding with a
companion horse.  Short trail rides.  These horses were owned in partnership by
 me and my boyfriend (who did the training).  He did not train as a livelihood
but was very good (now deceased) and always liked to take in a horse or two
each summer.  He had the time to give the younsters lots of individualized
attention.  So, how did these horses fare in later life?  None of them went
 lame or suffered any structural injuries.  Some of the horses were sold.
Some used as trail horses, others as show horses.  He liked to start a young
 promising horse, and if it had the talent, show it (western, trail) for
several years and then sell it.  A number of these horses were very successful
in the show ring (open and quarter horse shows) for their new owners - usually
amateurs.  I still own two of the horses he started (both at two).  One is now
14 and sound (I showed her very successfully in trail from three years old
until she was about 10) - I now use her for trail riding.  My other mare is now
 6 (started also at two) have shown her and used her for trail riding - she is
sound also.  Another horse, started at two, went on to be a very successful
showhorse, winning big important classes (i.e., Cow Palace, S.F.) into his 20's
.
   Sorry this is so long winded, and if you held on to this point, I just
wanted to share my personal experiences, and my belief that starting to ride
a horse at two, is not necessarily, an evil practice.  If done with thought and
 care, a horse can remain sound for years to come.
           Cheryl

 
 
 

Riding a two year old.

Post by Pat & Larry Smi » Fri, 05 Apr 1996 04:00:00


Quote:



> >I have been told that you may ride some horses at to years depending on there
> >developement.  Is this wrong?  If so can you start trying to put
bareback pads
> >or light saddles untill the horses are ready for the weight of an ***?


>    Sorry this is so long winded, and if you held on to this point, I just
> wanted to share my personal experiences, and my belief that starting to ride
> a horse at two, is not necessarily, an evil practice.  If done with
thought and
>  care, a horse can remain sound for years to come.
>            Cheryl

 We have been raising quarter horses for quite some time. All of our
horses have been started at two. Of our four two year olds this year, one
was started in December, three will be started next week.

Although I agree lots of horses are ruined from working them too hard, I
also believe as Cheryl has said, with good sense they can be ridden
without hurting them.

Pat S