Gaited horse training question

Gaited horse training question

Post by jmc » Tue, 08 Jun 2010 08:35:41


Went to a Mountain Horse Club versatility day... not many horses there,
but met some of Yankee's cousins...

Talked to some of the folks who train, and observed riding.  I was told,
as I have been before, that to get a horse to gait you have to have a
strong feel on the bit.  What I observed is people sometimes cranking
down on their horses, a lot of long curbs, and some gaping mouths.  I
also observed that horses somehow managed to gait even when the rider
didn't have a deathgrip on the reins, as in the case of the kids
participating.

What I'm wondering is:  Is this "necessity" for a strong hand a true
necessity, or more like a tradition?  What I mean is, is a strong hand
needed because that's the way the trainers train the horses to be? If
it's needed, can someone explain to my why a horse that gaits naturally
without a rider would need all that to gait with a rider, when horses
that trot don't need that at all?

I admit I'm still fairly ignorant about gaited horses, but have trained
young horses before, and hope to train Yankee myself when the time
comes, but I keep getting told that not only will he have to go to a
special trainer, but that I'll need to take special lessons as well to
learn to ride gaited - which from some observations means slumpy with my
legs forward, and a strong hand on the reins... Not all riders of gaited
horses seem to ride like that, but I'm seeing that a lot on the Rockies.

Always willing to be eddicated:

jmc

 
 
 

Gaited horse training question

Post by Eilee » Tue, 08 Jun 2010 09:46:49


Quote:
> What I'm wondering is: ?Is this "necessity" for a strong hand a true
> necessity,

Of course not. They gait in the field, for pete's sake. You need to
help them find the gait under saddle, just like they find any gait
under saddle (ever do the first trot or first canter for a baby? It's
an eye opener!). But this does not require yanking heads up, death
locks, etc.

However, finding a good gaited trainer can be verrrry challenging!

Eileen Morgan
The Mare's Nest (PA)

 
 
 

Gaited horse training question

Post by Dr Corinne B Lee » Tue, 08 Jun 2010 11:01:25



Quote:

>> What I'm wondering is: ?Is this "necessity" for a strong hand a true
>> necessity,

>Of course not. They gait in the field, for pete's sake. You need to
>help them find the gait under saddle, just like they find any gait
>under saddle (ever do the first trot or first canter for a baby? It's
>an eye opener!). But this does not require yanking heads up, death
>locks, etc.

Agreed.
I am having a brain fart and not remembering the woman's name who
wrote the gaited bible.  May she RIP.

Quote:
>However, finding a good gaited trainer can be verrrry challenging!

Use a good BS filter when looking for them.

Corinne & Happier Crazy Canuck Crew, now power is restored to the
tower that provides the 'Net feed....

--
*** Conserve Energy: Laughter is easier than Anger!


 
 
 

Gaited horse training question

Post by Dawn J- » Tue, 08 Jun 2010 11:42:29


Quote:



> >> What I'm wondering is: ?Is this "necessity" for a strong hand a true
> >> necessity,

> >Of course not. They gait in the field, for pete's sake. You need to
> >help them find the gait under saddle, just like they find any gait
> >under saddle (ever do the first trot or first canter for a baby? It's
> >an eye opener!). But this does not require yanking heads up, death
> >locks, etc.

> Agreed.
> I am having a brain fart and not remembering the woman's name who
> wrote the gaited bible. ?May she RIP.

Lee Ziegler.  She was a wonderful horsewoman.  I believe that her book
is still available.  Great stuff.

"Easy-Gaited Horses: Gentle, humane methods for training and riding
gaited pleasure horses"
http://www.amazon.com/Easy-Gaited-Horses-methods-training-pleasure/dp...

(PS an errata list exists and can be found on-line-- as in here:
http://iceryder.net/leebookcorrection.html )

a list of articles by Lee:
http://iceryder.net/lee/index.html

The "wayback machine's" archived version of Lee's web site:
http://web.archive.org/web/20070324022440/http://leeziegler.com/index...

Dawn
who has never ridden a gaited horse, but is still interested in good
horsemanship wherever it can be found

 
 
 

Gaited horse training question

Post by Bill Kambi » Tue, 08 Jun 2010 11:57:02



Quote:
>Went to a Mountain Horse Club versatility day... not many horses there,
>but met some of Yankee's cousins...

>Talked to some of the folks who train, and observed riding.  I was told,
>as I have been before, that to get a horse to gait you have to have a
>strong feel on the bit.  What I observed is people sometimes cranking
>down on their horses, a lot of long curbs, and some gaping mouths.  I
>also observed that horses somehow managed to gait even when the rider
>didn't have a deathgrip on the reins, as in the case of the kids
>participating.

>What I'm wondering is:  Is this "necessity" for a strong hand a true
>necessity, or more like a tradition?  What I mean is, is a strong hand
>needed because that's the way the trainers train the horses to be? If
>it's needed, can someone explain to my why a horse that gaits naturally
>without a rider would need all that to gait with a rider, when horses
>that trot don't need that at all?

>I admit I'm still fairly ignorant about gaited horses, but have trained
>young horses before, and hope to train Yankee myself when the time
>comes, but I keep getting told that not only will he have to go to a
>special trainer, but that I'll need to take special lessons as well to
>learn to ride gaited - which from some observations means slumpy with my
>legs forward, and a strong hand on the reins... Not all riders of gaited
>horses seem to ride like that, but I'm seeing that a lot on the Rockies.

>Always willing to be eddicated:

The short answer is that you don't have to have a "strong" feeling in
the hand.  Some soft gaited horses can even work on a Western loose
rein.

The longer answer is that a very large number of soft gaited horses
will work better when ridden in contact.  "Contact" here does not mean
"cranked down" but more like "contact" in the classical equitation
sense.  I'm not fully sure why this is.  I think Lee Z. may have
addressed this in one or more of her writings.  Her work is still
valuable.

Because soft gait is an "individual" thing with each horse it's
sometimes tough to come up with "hard and fast" rules.  This is
particularly true in the North American breeds where breed standards
are vague and judging standards are poorly enforced.  You won't really
know what you got until the horse goes under saddle.  Even then saddle
placement, saddle type, rein practices, hoof angles, rider position,
and other factors will influence how a soft intermediate gait is
expressed.

Sadly, there's a bunch of "generational tradition" in many gaited
breeds that's pretty much based on myth and legend.  You sometimes
have to pick through a bunch of fly dung to find the pepper.  :-) With
a soft gaited horse, like with any other, good horsemanship is usually
pretty evident.  As is bad horsemanship.  

 
 
 

Gaited horse training question

Post by jmc » Wed, 09 Jun 2010 08:50:06

Suddenly, without warning, Bill Kambic exclaimed (6/6/2010 10:57 PM):

Quote:


>> Went to a Mountain Horse Club versatility day... not many horses there,
>> but met some of Yankee's cousins...

>> Talked to some of the folks who train, and observed riding.  I was told,
>> as I have been before, that to get a horse to gait you have to have a
>> strong feel on the bit.  What I observed is people sometimes cranking
>> down on their horses, a lot of long curbs, and some gaping mouths.  I
>> also observed that horses somehow managed to gait even when the rider
>> didn't have a deathgrip on the reins, as in the case of the kids
>> participating.

>> What I'm wondering is:  Is this "necessity" for a strong hand a true
>> necessity, or more like a tradition?  What I mean is, is a strong hand
>> needed because that's the way the trainers train the horses to be? If
>> it's needed, can someone explain to my why a horse that gaits naturally
>> without a rider would need all that to gait with a rider, when horses
>> that trot don't need that at all?

>> I admit I'm still fairly ignorant about gaited horses, but have trained
>> young horses before, and hope to train Yankee myself when the time
>> comes, but I keep getting told that not only will he have to go to a
>> special trainer, but that I'll need to take special lessons as well to
>> learn to ride gaited - which from some observations means slumpy with my
>> legs forward, and a strong hand on the reins... Not all riders of gaited
>> horses seem to ride like that, but I'm seeing that a lot on the Rockies.

>> Always willing to be eddicated:

> The short answer is that you don't have to have a "strong" feeling in
> the hand.  Some soft gaited horses can even work on a Western loose
> rein.

> The longer answer is that a very large number of soft gaited horses
> will work better when ridden in contact.  "Contact" here does not mean
> "cranked down" but more like "contact" in the classical equitation
> sense.  I'm not fully sure why this is.  I think Lee Z. may have
> addressed this in one or more of her writings.  Her work is still
> valuable.

> Because soft gait is an "individual" thing with each horse it's
> sometimes tough to come up with "hard and fast" rules.  This is
> particularly true in the North American breeds where breed standards
> are vague and judging standards are poorly enforced.  You won't really
> know what you got until the horse goes under saddle.  Even then saddle
> placement, saddle type, rein practices, hoof angles, rider position,
> and other factors will influence how a soft intermediate gait is
> expressed.

> Sadly, there's a bunch of "generational tradition" in many gaited
> breeds that's pretty much based on myth and legend.  You sometimes
> have to pick through a bunch of fly dung to find the pepper.  :-) With
> a soft gaited horse, like with any other, good horsemanship is usually
> pretty evident.  As is bad horsemanship.  

Thank you, Bill.  Only one question:  When you say "soft gait", what do
you mean?

jmc

 
 
 

Gaited horse training question

Post by jmc » Wed, 09 Jun 2010 08:51:35

Suddenly, without warning, Eileen exclaimed (6/6/2010 8:46 PM):

Quote:

>> What I'm wondering is:  Is this "necessity" for a strong hand a true
>> necessity,

> Of course not. They gait in the field, for pete's sake. You need to
> help them find the gait under saddle, just like they find any gait
> under saddle (ever do the first trot or first canter for a baby? It's
> an eye opener!). But this does not require yanking heads up, death
> locks, etc.

> However, finding a good gaited trainer can be verrrry challenging!

> Eileen Morgan
> The Mare's Nest (PA)

Originally, I would have asked the members of the mountain horse club,
but looks like I might have to cast my net wider... Oh, well, I got two
years to look.

jmc

 
 
 

Gaited horse training question

Post by Dawn J- » Wed, 09 Jun 2010 09:44:17


Quote:
> Suddenly, without warning, Bill Kambic exclaimed (6/6/2010 10:57 PM):



> >> Went to a Mountain Horse Club versatility day... not many horses there,
> >> but met some of Yankee's cousins...

> >> Talked to some of the folks who train, and observed riding. ?I was told,
> >> as I have been before, that to get a horse to gait you have to have a
> >> strong feel on the bit. ?What I observed is people sometimes cranking
> >> down on their horses, a lot of long curbs, and some gaping mouths. ?I
> >> also observed that horses somehow managed to gait even when the rider
> >> didn't have a deathgrip on the reins, as in the case of the kids
> >> participating.

> >> What I'm wondering is: ?Is this "necessity" for a strong hand a true
> >> necessity, or more like a tradition? ?What I mean is, is a strong hand
> >> needed because that's the way the trainers train the horses to be? If
> >> it's needed, can someone explain to my why a horse that gaits naturally
> >> without a rider would need all that to gait with a rider, when horses
> >> that trot don't need that at all?

> >> I admit I'm still fairly ignorant about gaited horses, but have trained
> >> young horses before, and hope to train Yankee myself when the time
> >> comes, but I keep getting told that not only will he have to go to a
> >> special trainer, but that I'll need to take special lessons as well to
> >> learn to ride gaited - which from some observations means slumpy with my
> >> legs forward, and a strong hand on the reins... Not all riders of gaited
> >> horses seem to ride like that, but I'm seeing that a lot on the Rockies.

> >> Always willing to be eddicated:

> > The short answer is that you don't have to have a "strong" feeling in
> > the hand. ?Some soft gaited horses can even work on a Western loose
> > rein.

> > The longer answer is that a very large number of soft gaited horses
> > will work better when ridden in contact. ?"Contact" here does not mean
> > "cranked down" but more like "contact" in the classical equitation
> > sense. ?I'm not fully sure why this is. ?I think Lee Z. may have
> > addressed this in one or more of her writings. ?Her work is still
> > valuable.

> > Because soft gait is an "individual" thing with each horse it's
> > sometimes tough to come up with "hard and fast" rules. ?This is
> > particularly true in the North American breeds where breed standards
> > are vague and judging standards are poorly enforced. ?You won't really
> > know what you got until the horse goes under saddle. ?Even then saddle
> > placement, saddle type, rein practices, hoof angles, rider position,
> > and other factors will influence how a soft intermediate gait is
> > expressed.

> > Sadly, there's a bunch of "generational tradition" in many gaited
> > breeds that's pretty much based on myth and legend. ?You sometimes
> > have to pick through a bunch of fly dung to find the pepper. ?:-) With
> > a soft gaited horse, like with any other, good horsemanship is usually
> > pretty evident. ?As is bad horsemanship. ?

> Thank you, Bill. ?Only one question: ?When you say "soft gait", what do
> you mean?

> jmc

Not, Bill, but I believe that "soft gait" or "easy gait" refers to
horses whose intermediate gait is one of the "smooth gaits" rather
than the trot.

For basic info on the "soft" intermediate gaits:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ambling

Bill will undoubtedly be able to correct me if I am wrong.  I only
know anything about "gaited" stuff because of a peripheral interest,
while he has personal knowledge and experience. :-)

--Dawn JL

 
 
 

Gaited horse training question

Post by jmc » Wed, 09 Jun 2010 10:22:45

Suddenly, without warning, Dawn J-L exclaimed (6/7/2010 8:44 PM):

Quote:

>> Suddenly, without warning, Bill Kambic exclaimed (6/6/2010 10:57 PM):



>>>> Went to a Mountain Horse Club versatility day... not many horses there,
>>>> but met some of Yankee's cousins...
>>>> Talked to some of the folks who train, and observed riding.  I was told,
>>>> as I have been before, that to get a horse to gait you have to have a
>>>> strong feel on the bit.  What I observed is people sometimes cranking
>>>> down on their horses, a lot of long curbs, and some gaping mouths.  I
>>>> also observed that horses somehow managed to gait even when the rider
>>>> didn't have a deathgrip on the reins, as in the case of the kids
>>>> participating.
>>>> What I'm wondering is:  Is this "necessity" for a strong hand a true
>>>> necessity, or more like a tradition?  What I mean is, is a strong hand
>>>> needed because that's the way the trainers train the horses to be? If
>>>> it's needed, can someone explain to my why a horse that gaits naturally
>>>> without a rider would need all that to gait with a rider, when horses
>>>> that trot don't need that at all?
>>>> I admit I'm still fairly ignorant about gaited horses, but have trained
>>>> young horses before, and hope to train Yankee myself when the time
>>>> comes, but I keep getting told that not only will he have to go to a
>>>> special trainer, but that I'll need to take special lessons as well to
>>>> learn to ride gaited - which from some observations means slumpy with my
>>>> legs forward, and a strong hand on the reins... Not all riders of gaited
>>>> horses seem to ride like that, but I'm seeing that a lot on the Rockies.
>>>> Always willing to be eddicated:
>>> The short answer is that you don't have to have a "strong" feeling in
>>> the hand.  Some soft gaited horses can even work on a Western loose
>>> rein.
>>> The longer answer is that a very large number of soft gaited horses
>>> will work better when ridden in contact.  "Contact" here does not mean
>>> "cranked down" but more like "contact" in the classical equitation
>>> sense.  I'm not fully sure why this is.  I think Lee Z. may have
>>> addressed this in one or more of her writings.  Her work is still
>>> valuable.
>>> Because soft gait is an "individual" thing with each horse it's
>>> sometimes tough to come up with "hard and fast" rules.  This is
>>> particularly true in the North American breeds where breed standards
>>> are vague and judging standards are poorly enforced.  You won't really
>>> know what you got until the horse goes under saddle.  Even then saddle
>>> placement, saddle type, rein practices, hoof angles, rider position,
>>> and other factors will influence how a soft intermediate gait is
>>> expressed.
>>> Sadly, there's a bunch of "generational tradition" in many gaited
>>> breeds that's pretty much based on myth and legend.  You sometimes
>>> have to pick through a bunch of fly dung to find the pepper.  :-) With
>>> a soft gaited horse, like with any other, good horsemanship is usually
>>> pretty evident.  As is bad horsemanship.  
>> Thank you, Bill.  Only one question:  When you say "soft gait", what do
>> you mean?

>> jmc

> Not, Bill, but I believe that "soft gait" or "easy gait" refers to
> horses whose intermediate gait is one of the "smooth gaits" rather
> than the trot.

> For basic info on the "soft" intermediate gaits:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ambling

> Bill will undoubtedly be able to correct me if I am wrong.  I only
> know anything about "gaited" stuff because of a peripheral interest,
> while he has personal knowledge and experience. :-)

> --Dawn JL

I've never even been *around* gaited horses, so this is all brand new to me!

Not even sure what Yankee's non-a-trot gait is called - Amble? It is
almost, but not quite, a pace, 'cept the same side feet don't touch the
ground at quite the exact same moment - there's no moment of suspension.
  It's almost exactly like his walk, which looks "different" to the BO
and I though we can't quite put our fingers on why, since the footfall
pattern is the same.  I think the cadence must be slightly different.

Sadly, I've not been able to get video of him gaiting for more than a
couple of seconds.

You added a dimension that makes more sense, I was thinking he meant
more like "natural gait" - soft as in, easy/natural for the horse to do
- but "soft gait" as a term for all the smooth riding non-trot
intermediate gaits makes more sense.

jmc

 
 
 

Gaited horse training question

Post by Dawn J- » Wed, 09 Jun 2010 10:29:45


Quote:
> Suddenly, without warning, Dawn J-L exclaimed (6/7/2010 8:44 PM):


(snip) ?
> >> Thank you, Bill. ?Only one question: ?When you say "soft gait", what do
> >> you mean?

> >> jmc

> > Not, Bill, but I believe that "soft gait" or "easy gait" refers to
> > horses whose intermediate gait is one of the "smooth gaits" rather
> > than the trot.

> > For basic info on the "soft" intermediate gaits: ?http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ambling

> > Bill will undoubtedly be able to correct me if I am wrong. ?I only
> > know anything about "gaited" stuff because of a peripheral interest,
> > while he has personal knowledge and experience. :-)

> > --Dawn JL

> I've never even been *around* gaited horses, so this is all brand new to me!

> Not even sure what Yankee's non-a-trot gait is called - Amble?

The wikipedia article seems to indicate that "amble" is largely a
generic term of any/all of the soft gaits.  In addition to the
historical usage, I suspect there may well be some regional usage that
are specific to a particular gait.  I don't know enough to say.  ;-)

Quote:
>  It is almost, but not quite, a pace, 'cept the same side feet don't touch the
> ground at quite the exact same moment - there's no moment of suspension.
> ? It's almost exactly like his walk, which looks "different" to the BO
> and I though we can't quite put our fingers on why, since the footfall
> pattern is the same. ?I think the cadence must be slightly different.

> Sadly, I've not been able to get video of him gaiting for more than a
> couple of seconds.

> You added a dimension that makes more sense, I was thinking he meant
> more like "natural gait" - soft as in, easy/natural for the horse to do
> - but "soft gait" as a term for all the smooth riding non-trot
> intermediate gaits makes more sense.

> jmc

Have you checked out any of the Lee Ziegler articles?  She had a
wealth of knowledge and a depth of understanding of the biomechanics
of gaits that she willingly shared.  (She used to post here on the
wreck)  I suspect you will like her writing.  I love her book and
often go back and reread sections.  Valuable insights even for a DQ
like me.  ;-)

--Dawn JL

 
 
 

Gaited horse training question

Post by Dr Corinne B Lee » Wed, 09 Jun 2010 11:11:16

Just an insert here:

Sally, of Rocky fame, posts here sometimes.  
I visited her last summer (bless her heart!) and she has 2 of them.
Quite nice and easy riders.
Email me and I'll send you her last email that I have (I am sure it's
not changed).
My email is unmunged.

Corinne & Happy Crazy Canuck Crew, amazed at downloading an episode of
"Avatar: The Last Airbender" in only 5 mins at 81 Mb!!!!  WOW!  So
*this* is what being out of the Stone Age is like...

--
*** Conserve Energy: Laughter is easier than Anger!

 
 
 

Gaited horse training question

Post by Bill Kambi » Wed, 09 Jun 2010 13:33:07



Quote:
>> Not, Bill, but I believe that "soft gait" or "easy gait" refers to
>> horses whose intermediate gait is one of the "smooth gaits" rather
>> than the trot.

>> For basic info on the "soft" intermediate gaits:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ambling

>> Bill will undoubtedly be able to correct me if I am wrong.  I only
>> know anything about "gaited" stuff because of a peripheral interest,
>> while he has personal knowledge and experience. :-)

>> --Dawn JL

>I've never even been *around* gaited horses, so this is all brand new to me!

Dawn pretty much called it right!!!  :-)

Quote:
>Not even sure what Yankee's non-a-trot gait is called - Amble? It is
>almost, but not quite, a pace, 'cept the same side feet don't touch the
>ground at quite the exact same moment - there's no moment of suspension.
>  It's almost exactly like his walk, which looks "different" to the BO
>and I though we can't quite put our fingers on why, since the footfall
>pattern is the same.  I think the cadence must be slightly different.

It's very easy to get "bogged down" in trying to put a name on a way
of going.  Don't do that!!!  :-)  If his intermediate gait is not a
two beat gait (trot or pace) then we can call it a "soft" gait because
he will always have one or more feet on the ground (no moment of
suspension and a "soft" way of going for the rider).  Just where on
the continuum of soft gaits he is less important than that's what he's
doing.  For some disciplines this is a "deal breaker" and you sell
him.  For others it's not.

Quote:
>Sadly, I've not been able to get video of him gaiting for more than a
>couple of seconds.

It's very common in soft-gaited horses for a horse to do one thing at
liberty and something very different under saddle.  And some
soft-gaited horses can also trot and/or pace.  Don't worry about
giving what he's doing a name; it'll likely change when ge goes under
saddle.

Quote:
>You added a dimension that makes more sense, I was thinking he meant
>more like "natural gait" - soft as in, easy/natural for the horse to do
>- but "soft gait" as a term for all the smooth riding non-trot
>intermediate gaits makes more sense.

I hate the word "natural" because it's been co-opted by the lunatic
fringe in a lot of cases.  I use the phrase "native way of going" to
label what the horse will do if just left alone.  But that's my
personal phrasology and not widespread.  :-)

Don't obscess over movement at this stage.  It is what it is.  To a
degree you'll be able to modify it later.  Soft gaits are modestly
"malleable."

We're off to IL in the a.m. for my nephew's wedding and I may be out
of contact 'till next Sunday.  If I can I'll "drop in" but otherwise
it will be a few days!!  :-)

 
 
 

Gaited horse training question

Post by Tara » Thu, 10 Jun 2010 01:57:24


Quote:

> It's very common in soft-gaited horses for a horse to do one thing at
> liberty and something very different under saddle.  And some
> soft-gaited horses can also trot and/or pace.  Don't worry about
> giving what he's doing a name; it'll likely change when ge goes under
> saddle.

I don't know if this is what you're talking about but there's a Morgan at my
place that, when asked to trot, starts out with a lateral gate that is very
smooth but after several strides with the rider posting he'll go to trot.
Amie had to put some exercise rides on this horse when he first came and
she'd never felt a lateral gait before. She said that it was the smoothest
thing she'd ever felt but didn't know what to do with it or how to keep it
going.

Tara

 
 
 

Gaited horse training question

Post by Poplar Flats Far » Fri, 11 Jun 2010 02:44:45


Quote:

> I don't know if this is what you're talking about but there's a Morgan at my
> place that, when asked to trot, starts out with a lateral gate that is very
> smooth but after several strides with the rider posting he'll go to trot.
> Amie had to put some exercise rides on this horse when he first came and
> she'd never felt a lateral gait before. She said that it was the smoothest
> thing she'd ever felt but didn't know what to do with it or how to keep it
> going.

If you look at the "Western Working Morgan" information, you'll see
that many of them perform a singlefoot gait (one of the "soft" gaits).
Maybe that's that this horse does, before the posting rider urges the
horse into a trot.

I've ridden a gaited horse exactly once. It wasn't smooth at all.
Could be the horse was just one of those critters that is just
uncomfortable to ride. <shrug>

Other that that, I've no experience whatsoever with gaited horses. But
I do like Morgans.

--Karen Smith

 
 
 

Gaited horse training question

Post by Tom & Winnie Lin » Fri, 11 Jun 2010 04:14:01


Quote:
> I've ridden a gaited horse exactly once. It wasn't smooth at all.
> Could be the horse was just one of those critters that is just
> uncomfortable to ride.<shrug>

I rode a TW a few months ago just at the walk. I described it as feeling
like I was riding a beach ball in a bowl of Jello. It was what I
imagined a camel ride to feel like.
Since then his owner sent him for training with someone who knows gaited
horses. He is back and she is very pleased but since we don't often ride
at the same time i haven't seen him under saddle. He is a sweet horse.
Winnie