teaching baby canter leads

teaching baby canter leads

Post by Pam Whi » Tue, 09 Mar 1999 04:00:00


 My 2 year old just does not want to take his right lead. He does his
left lead fine. He will do both lead on the lunge. Ive heard it is common
for young horses to have problems with one lead or the other I wonder if
there are any exercises to help my youngster learn to use both leads.

--

Pam White

 
 
 

teaching baby canter leads

Post by Petra Ruttige » Tue, 09 Mar 1999 04:00:00

Quote:

> My 2 year old just does not want to take his right lead. He does his
>left lead fine. He will do both lead on the lunge. Ive heard it is common
>for young horses to have problems with one lead or the other I wonder if
>there are any exercises to help my youngster learn to use both leads.

personally I don't think 2 year olds should be ridden at all. (Apart from
maybe very lightly backed and walked about quietly with a rider for a few
minutes a few times)
They are not
strong enough to
cope and certainly not  mature enough to pick canter leads under saddle. You
won't want to hear this and will probably ignore it - but I'd put the horse
out again until he's 3 and a half and then start again.

Petra

 
 
 

teaching baby canter leads

Post by R Bisho » Tue, 09 Mar 1999 04:00:00



Quote:


>> My 2 year old just does not want to take his right lead. He does his
>>left lead fine. He will do both lead on the lunge. Ive heard it is common
>>for young horses to have problems with one lead or the other I wonder if
>>there are any exercises to help my youngster learn to use both leads.

>personally I don't think 2 year olds should be ridden at all. (Apart from
>maybe very lightly backed and walked about quietly with a rider for a few
>minutes a few times)
>They are not
>strong enough to
>cope and certainly not  mature enough to pick canter leads under saddle. You
>won't want to hear this and will probably ignore it - but I'd put the horse
>out again until he's 3 and a half and then start again.

>Petra

Petra is entirely right.  You have a BABY.  If he's two, then I bet he's not
even a FULL two, when was he foaled?   Turn him out and let his bones mature
without the stress of a rider and keep your fingers cross there isn't any
damage as yet.

Sue

There are few ills in the world that a hot bath and a pitcher of Marguerita Gold cannot cure.

With apologies to W. Somerset Maugham

 
 
 

teaching baby canter leads

Post by Karen R » Tue, 09 Mar 1999 04:00:00

Quote:

> My 2 year old just does not want to take his right lead. He does his
>left lead fine. He will do both lead on the lunge. Ive heard it is common
>for young horses to have problems with one lead or the other I wonder if
>there are any exercises to help my youngster learn to use both leads.

My old instructor once had a youngster who would *not* pick up the right
lead. For over 6 months, my instructor tried every possible exercise to get
him to take the right lead. Then one day, he just started picking it up. She
went on to take him to Grand Prix. But, of course, he was actually old
enough to be ridden at that time.

--
* Karen D. Rust
* kdrust at labyrinth dot net
* http://SportToday.org/
* West ***ia University School of Medicine
* Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology

 
 
 

teaching baby canter leads

Post by Jane H. Kilbe » Tue, 09 Mar 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

> My 2 year old just does not want to take his right lead. He does his
>left lead fine. He will do both lead on the lunge. Ive heard it is common
>for young horses to have problems with one lead or the other I wonder if
>there are any exercises to help my youngster learn to use both leads.

Horses are right sided or left sided, so it isn't uncommon for a horse
just under saddle to have problems with cues on one particular side. Be
patient. Since he will pick up both leads at the lunge, work your
transitions under saddle in the same manner, particularly if you use vocal
sounds for lead pickup.

Also be aware of your own body. Since you also favor one side, you tend to
be stronger on one side in giving a cue than the other or clearer on one
side than the other. This is also common and takes a bit of effort to
overcome the discrepencies.

At 2 & 1/2, my stallion, Tarzan, had a difficult time picking up his left
lead. It was his "weaker" side. I worked him in the pastures using the
fence as a guide and accentuated the left lead cue. In time, he picked it
up nicely. Out on the trails, when the terrain permitted, I would
alternate leads on the straight away. However, before I began working
leads, I made sure he was solid at the walk and trot as well as pacing and
transitions. Tarzan is very comfortable at the lope but would tire out
quickly due to his lack of condition which improved over time. So make
sure you don't over do the lope.

down the spotted trails. . .
jane h. kilberg and her gang of spots (GOS)
member: ApHC, Montgomery County *** Horse Committee
editor/publisher: Appaloosa Network

 
 
 

teaching baby canter leads

Post by Lori » Tue, 09 Mar 1999 04:00:00

Quote:

> My 2 year old just does not want to take his right lead. He does his
>left lead fine. He will do both lead on the lunge. Ive heard it is common
>for young horses to have problems with one lead or the other I wonder if
>there are any exercises to help my youngster learn to use both leads.

My gelding couldn't pick up his right lead under saddle (except when landing
from a jump) until he was 5 --- after having hind shoes put on that gave him
enough *stability* that his right hock & stifle seem to have been able to
gain some much needed strength (his hock hasn't *wobbled* at the walk
since --- and he's been barefoot ever since, too).  Let your baby grow up
awhile longer, then ask your farrier and vet if there's anything he might
need to help compensate for conformation flaws until he's stronger and his
muscles are more developed.
 
 
 

teaching baby canter leads

Post by Tallysg » Thu, 11 Mar 1999 04:00:00

Quote:

>My old instructor once had a youngster who would *not* pick up the right
>lead. For over 6 months, my instructor tried every possible exercise to get
>him to take the right lead. Then one day, he just started picking it up. She
>went on to take him to Grand Prix. But, of course, he was actually old
>enough to be ridden at that time.

>--

I agree with the "too young" school of thought.
I wonder, Karen, if you could tell us how old this youngster of your
intructor's was.  I have a hunch he was at least 5 years old.  Just curious.

Karen H.

 
 
 

teaching baby canter leads

Post by Karen R » Thu, 11 Mar 1999 04:00:00

Quote:

>I agree with the "too young" school of thought.
>I wonder, Karen, if you could tell us how old this youngster of your
>intructor's was.  I have a hunch he was at least 5 years old.  Just

curious.

I didn't know the horse personally, just through pictures and my
instructor's anecdotes about him, but I'm pretty sure he was a long 4 year
old at the time.

--
* Karen D. Rust
* kdrust at labyrinth dot net
* http://SportToday.org/
* West ***ia University School of Medicine
* Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology

 
 
 

teaching baby canter leads

Post by hur.. » Thu, 11 Mar 1999 04:00:00

On Mon, 8 Mar 1999 12:08:40 -0000, "Petra Ruttiger"

Quote:


>> My 2 year old just does not want to take his right lead. He does his
>>left lead fine. He will do both lead on the lunge. Ive heard it is common
>>for young horses to have problems with one lead or the other I wonder if
>>there are any exercises to help my youngster learn to use both leads.

>personally I don't think 2 year olds should be ridden at all. (Apart from
>maybe very lightly backed and walked about quietly with a rider for a few
>minutes a few times)
>They are not
>strong enough to
>cope and certainly not  mature enough to pick canter leads under saddle. You
>won't want to hear this and will probably ignore it - but I'd put the horse
>out again until he's 3 and a half and then start again.

>Petra

I completely agree with Petra, a 2 year old is not ready to begin any
hard work, especially learning how to canter let alone learning what
lead is what.

Sharon Hurley

 
 
 

teaching baby canter leads

Post by hur.. » Thu, 11 Mar 1999 04:00:00


Quote:



>>Horses are right sided or left sided, so it isn't uncommon for a horse
>just under saddle to have problems with cues on one particular side. Be
>patient. Since he will pick up both leads at the lunge, work your
>transitions under saddle in the same manner, particularly if you use vocal
>sounds for lead pickup.

>At 2 & 1/2, my stallion, Tarzan, had a difficult time picking up his left
>lead. It was his "weaker" side. I worked him in the pastures using the
>fence as a guide and accentuated the left lead cue. In time, he picked it
>up nicely. Out on the trails, when the terrain permitted, I would
>alternate leads on the straight away. However, before I began working
>leads, I made sure he was solid at the walk and trot as well as pacing and
>transitions. Tarzan is very comfortable at the lope but would tire out
>quickly due to his lack of condition which improved over time. So make
>sure you don't over do the lope.

>down the spotted trails. . .
>jane h. kilberg and her gang of spots (GOS)
>member: ApHC, Montgomery County *** Horse Committee
>editor/publisher: Appaloosa Network

Jane, I usually agree with everything that you post, and this is good
advise but I think that the big picture here is that we are dealing
with a baby!!!  A 2 year old horse. I think that it is outragous that
anyone spends lots of time training horses that are under 3 or in the
fall of the horse's 3 year old year.  It is just too *** their
minds and bodies.  (this of course is focused on riding training, you
can do a lot of ground work that will help make the transition to
riding easier)

Sharon Hurley

 
 
 

teaching baby canter leads

Post by R Bisho » Thu, 11 Mar 1999 04:00:00



Quote:




>>>Horses are right sided or left sided, so it isn't uncommon for a horse
>>just under saddle to have problems with cues on one particular side. Be
>>patient. Since he will pick up both leads at the lunge, work your
>>transitions under saddle in the same manner, particularly if you use vocal
>>sounds for lead pickup.

>>At 2 & 1/2, my stallion, Tarzan, had a difficult time picking up his left
>>lead. It was his "weaker" side. I worked him in the pastures using the
>>fence as a guide and accentuated the left lead cue. In time, he picked it
>>up nicely. Out on the trails, when the terrain permitted, I would
>>alternate leads on the straight away. However, before I began working
>>leads, I made sure he was solid at the walk and trot as well as pacing and
>>transitions. Tarzan is very comfortable at the lope but would tire out
>>quickly due to his lack of condition which improved over time. So make
>>sure you don't over do the lope.

>>down the spotted trails. . .
>>jane h. kilberg and her gang of spots (GOS)
>>member: ApHC, Montgomery County *** Horse Committee
>>editor/publisher: Appaloosa Network

>Jane, I usually agree with everything that you post, and this is good
>advise but I think that the big picture here is that we are dealing
>with a baby!!!  A 2 year old horse. I think that it is outragous that
>anyone spends lots of time training horses that are under 3 or in the
>fall of the horse's 3 year old year.  It is just too *** their
>minds and bodies.  (this of course is focused on riding training, you
>can do a lot of ground work that will help make the transition to
>riding easier)

>Sharon Hurley

 Considering that this is March and this is a two year old, it's even
worse!
I have a two year old filly.  Who will not be a full two until late June.
She's a baby.  She LOOKS like a baby.  No way in HELL are we doing ANY
riding of this filly until Summer 2000.  

Sue

There are few ills in the world that a hot bath and a pitcher of Marguerita Gold cannot cure.

With apologies to W. Somerset Maugham

 
 
 

teaching baby canter leads

Post by Jane H. Kilbe » Thu, 11 Mar 1999 04:00:00

(snipped parts)

Quote:
>Jane, I usually agree with everything that you post, and this is good
>advise but I think that the big picture here is that we are dealing
>with a baby!!!  A 2 year old horse. I think that it is outragous that
>anyone spends lots of time training horses that are under 3 or in the
>fall of the horse's 3 year old year.  It is just too *** their
>minds and bodies.  (this of course is focused on riding training, you
>can do a lot of ground work that will help make the transition to
>riding easier)

Totally depends on the individual horse. Tarzan's knees were closed (had
radiographs done). Riding was light to moderate. His mind is just fine and
he had no objections to our excusions. When I pulled the saddle out, he
would come trotting over to me from the pasture. As for his body, it
handled it just fine and dandy. He stands 15.1 and is big boned, stock
type body. And yes, I did a lot of ground work on him as I do all the
horses. As to time spent, I didn't record hours, but in 4 months, I
probably put on about 50 hours or so which comes to about 12 hours a month
or 3 hours a week. Not much when ya think on it.

down the spotted trails. . .
jane h. kilberg and her gang of spots (GOS)
member: ApHC, Montgomery County *** Horse Committee
editor/publisher: Appaloosa Network

 
 
 

teaching baby canter leads

Post by Jane H. Kilbe » Thu, 11 Mar 1999 04:00:00


(snipped parts)

re: Tarzan

Quote:
> Considering that this is March and this is a two year old, it's even
>worse!

LOL....Tarzan was foaled 2/2/96, so he is three as of March, 1999. I got
him late September 1998 so he was a long 2 year old when I started riding
him.

down the spotted trails. . .
jane h. kilberg and her gang of spots (GOS)
member: ApHC, Montgomery County *** Horse Committee
editor/publisher: Appaloosa Network

 
 
 

teaching baby canter leads

Post by R Bisho » Thu, 11 Mar 1999 04:00:00



Quote:


>(snipped parts)

>re: Tarzan
>> Considering that this is March and this is a two year old, it's even
>>worse!

>LOL....Tarzan was foaled 2/2/96, so he is three as of March, 1999. I got
>him late September 1998 so he was a long 2 year old when I started riding
>him.

The horse was described as a two year old.  Yours is three.

Quote:

>down the spotted trails. . .
>jane h. kilberg and her gang of spots (GOS)
>member: ApHC, Montgomery County *** Horse Committee
>editor/publisher: Appaloosa Network

Sue

There are few ills in the world that a hot bath and a pitcher of Marguerita Gold cannot cure.

With apologies to W. Somerset Maugham

 
 
 

teaching baby canter leads

Post by Rayko » Fri, 12 Mar 1999 04:00:00

I agree that the horse should be being taught to canter yet, but many western
and stock horse breeds begin riding as two-year olds.  I'm not saying that it
is good for the horse or whatever, but it does happen.  

Anyway, I will actually suggest an excercise to help.  Try cuing for the canter
over a pole on the longe-line. Once your horse picks up the correct lead
consistently over a pole, you can try it under saddle with a pole as a guide.
Better yet, teach your horse or have someone help you and your horse learn how
to long-line.  You can use the pole as an aide and can also help your horse
distinguish rein aids without you on his back to throw off his balance.

Whitney  

------------------------------
"I take my chances every chance I get" - Mary Chapin Carpenter
"Wild horses run unbridles and their spirits never die" -Mariah Carey
"She is the angel of the discontented sould" -Everclear