Feeding advice sought

Feeding advice sought

Post by Jonathan Qui » Tue, 10 Jan 1995 22:40:17


Bella, my Oldenberg mare (currently in foal) came in from her summer on grass
a couple of months ago. We've brought her gruadually back onto hard feed in
addition to her hay and daytime grazing, and although she eats everything
offered, drinks normal amounts of water, looks healthy and seems perfectly
happy with life, her droppings are not the consistency I'd expect, being
more liquid than normal, similar to cattle droppings (though a little more
solid).

Her hard feed ration, twice daily, is as follows:

2 small scoops sugar beet
1 medium scoop bran
1 medium scoop oats
1 handful alfalfa
2 large handfulls chaff

Anyone got any suggestions for changes to her feed that might improve her
digestion? There are 5 other horses in her yard on the same mixture with
no problems, but they're used to this mix.

JJ.

 
 
 

Feeding advice sought

Post by thef.. » Wed, 11 Jan 1995 08:18:23


Quote:
>intro info ...
>Her hard feed ration, twice daily, is as follows:

>2 small scoops sugar beet
>1 medium scoop bran
>1 medium scoop oats
>1 handful alfalfa
>2 large handfulls chaff

What's a 'scoop'?  

 - Geek

 " ... one more sun comes sliding down the sky ... "

 
 
 

Feeding advice sought

Post by chuck lilligre » Wed, 11 Jan 1995 11:56:48

Has she been wormed lately?
Chuck
Z

 
 
 

Feeding advice sought

Post by Kyle Karno » Thu, 12 Jan 1995 06:14:58


Quote:
> Bella, my Oldenberg mare (currently in foal) came in from her summer on grass
> a couple of months ago. We've brought her gruadually back onto hard feed in
> addition to her hay and daytime grazing, and although she eats everything
> offered, drinks normal amounts of water, looks healthy and seems perfectly
> happy with life, her droppings are not the consistency I'd expect, being
> more liquid than normal, similar to cattle droppings (though a little more
> solid).
> Her hard feed ration, twice daily, is as follows:
> 2 small scoops sugar beet
> 1 medium scoop bran
> 1 medium scoop oats
> 1 handful alfalfa
> 2 large handfulls chaff
> Anyone got any suggestions for changes to her feed that might improve her
> digestion? There are 5 other horses in her yard on the same mixture with
> no problems, but they're used to this mix.
> JJ.

IMHO

Different horses respond differently to feed. She could be sensitive to one
of the items in your mix, or this could be normal for her. What were her
droppings like before the feed change? You also don't mention what kind of
hay she is fed - was the hay recently added to her diet as well? Perhaps
the hay disagrees with her. Some probiotics might help, but if this is
a feed related issue, it would probably be short term. In general I think your
options are to investigate the cause, or if the horse seems other wise health
and on a good worming schedule, ignore it.

Also, on general principle I might suggest that you evaluate the mineral
content of her diet as she is in foal. I notice no mineral supplement listed
in your feed, although with the right mixture of different hay, it may not be
necessary. Proper mineral balance is very important in a pregnant mare in
order to assure correct development of the foal, particularly
in warm***s. Manna Pro has a good booklet on the subject if you are
interested.

As usual YMMV,

Kyle Karnosh
Con Brio Farms
Quality Warm*** Sporthorses
Gilroy, CA

 
 
 

Feeding advice sought

Post by Neal Merc » Thu, 12 Jan 1995 09:52:43


Try removing the beet pulp.  Our stallion was quite runny as well, until
we removed the pulp.

 
 
 

Feeding advice sought

Post by thef.. » Thu, 12 Jan 1995 22:18:13

Beet pulp is one of those strange feed materials with
potential for highly different effects on the horse.

Fed soaked, as is usually desireable, it keeps the
manure soft and even loose.  Fed dry - and only in
small amounts that way, a quart or so - it is a
wonderful low voltage filler and will actually
dry up the manure.  Bran is the same way.  

Most horses are getting far too much grain and
not enough hay, however.  A mediocre but clean
grass hay, fed free choice, will do more for a
horse's gastrointestinal tract than anything
else.  This can be supplemented with a
few pounds of fancy alfalfa and a handful or
two of grain and vitamins/minerals to keep
most horses healthy and happy.  Of course
horses in hard work will benefit from more
grain, but not an excess.

GRATUITOUS FLAMEBAIT ADDENDUM:
Sweet feed is shit.  It's the worthless dusty
grains that can't sell on their own merits
weighted down with molasses that doesn't
do a single worthwhile thing for the animal's
metabolism.  It's the way mills market the
bottom of the barrel and floor sweepings.

(I don't have a pentium, so I use the flames
for central heating)

 - Geek

 " ... one more sun comes sliding down the sky ... "

 
 
 

Feeding advice sought

Post by Jo Crai » Fri, 13 Jan 1995 01:36:28

Quote:

> happy with life, her droppings are not the consistency I'd expect, being
> more liquid than normal, similar to cattle droppings (though a little more
> solid).

> Her hard feed ration, twice daily, is as follows:

> 2 small scoops sugar beet
> 1 medium scoop bran
> 1 medium scoop oats
> 1 handful alfalfa
> 2 large handfulls chaff

Two thoughts.  Do you mean beet pulp?  It must be soaked.  If you
don't soak it, you could end up with a horse who chokes or colics.
How big is a scoop?  Some horses will tolerate bran better than
others.  Some won't tolerate it without getting diarrhea (it IS
used as an equine laxative).  Also some WBs seem to have looser
than normal droppings.  (I know one who is over ten and she
has produced nearly cow piles her entire life.) Cow piles MAY be
pretty normal for this horse.  I suggest you cut out the bran and
see what happens.

Jo

 
 
 

Feeding advice sought

Post by Sullys Ma » Fri, 13 Jan 1995 05:35:19


Quote:



>>Subject: Re: Beet Pulp
>>Date: 11 Jan 1995 10:38:48 -0800

>>-
>....

>>I go into the feed stores and also complain becuase the feed mixes
>>they have are so high in protein.  I had a hard time last year when
>>I was fattening up Cayenne finding anything that didn't have
>>molasses in it.  At first I just added all sorts of things like veg
>>oil and rice bran to raise the fat content, then finally found
>>Athlete which worked great when added to pellets.

>        While I agree that most horses get too much concentrate and not enough
>roughage,  molasses isn't particularly high in protein--more
>carbohydrate than anything else. Also, molasses is what is used as a binder to
>hold pelleted feed together in most cases.

My mistake, I implied that molasses was high in protein-I had
switched subjects.  I object to the molasses because of the
sugar content.>

- Show quoted text -

Quote:
>>Karen (who thinks alfalfa is "evil")

>        Personally, I consider alfalfa as something to feed instead of grain, not in
>addition. Course, it is ridiculously expensive in this part of the country,
>and non-dusty alfalfa is practically impossible...
>                                          --C.M.Newell

>*****************************************************
>"Once in awhile/ You can get shown the light/
>In the strangest of places/ If you look at it right"
>                    --R. Hunter

 
 
 

Feeding advice sought

Post by thef.. » Fri, 13 Jan 1995 23:36:24


Quote:


>>Subject: Beet Pulp
>>Date: 11 Jan 1995 13:18:13 GMT

>>Beet pulp is one of those strange feed materials with
>>potential for highly different effects on the horse.

>>Fed soaked, as is usually desireable, it keeps the
>>manure soft and even loose.  Fed dry - and only in
>>small amounts that way, a quart or so - it is a
>>wonderful low voltage filler and will actually
>>dry up the manure.  Bran is the same way.  

>From what I've heard, you must be VERY careful when feeding beet pulp dry,
>actually most people won't do it, unless you need to take moisture out of
>the horse and I can't think of a situation in which you would want to do
>this. Feeding it dry will take needed moisture out of the horse's intestine
>and thus be more prone to colic!
>So I say don't do it!

You gotta be terrorized of any foodstuff if the animal is a
compulsive, gulpy eater.  If the horse gets freechoice
water and hay there will be a diminished liklihood
of any kind of gorging occurring, or being processed
inadequately.  If you cut back too far, they'll eat
toxic plants and even buildings.  I like the generous
attitude they get when they know everything is
always there for them.

Notice I said it is about a quart amount.  That is
the maximum volume of most of the glossy, big &
muscly horsepets here for the DAILY TOTAL of
all grain rations.

Quote:
>>GRATUITOUS FLAMEBAIT ADDENDUM:
>>Sweet feed is shit.  It's the worthless dusty
>>Geek

>I agree.
>Natural, plain old oats are best (exception - broodmares,foals,stallions)

Thanks, yes!  I buy racehorse oats and miscellaneous pure plant products
and grow as much hay as possible while keeping maximal pasture space.

Quote:
>A vet told me that anything that is processed loses its vitamins so a horse
>on sweet feed can look good on the outside but really be unfit and have
>decreased stamina - okay they may go all right, but they may go even better
>on plain oats.

Right!

Plus anything grown on DEFICIENT SOILS is nutrient deficient.
Bad agricultural techniques are behind a big part of the health
care crisis here in the us.

So eat your broccoli, but grow your own, cuz the economics
of agribusiness doesn't let them give a damn about the
quality of your life.

 - Geek  on  WARP

 " ... one more sun comes sliding down the sky ... "

 
 
 

Feeding advice sought

Post by chuck lilligre » Fri, 13 Jan 1995 20:41:49

Right on about the sweet feed. I said before, if you have to add molasses
to make a horse eat it, it wasn't much good in the first place. Don't these
people ever read the labels?
Chuck