Horse Switches Leads in Back at Canter!! Help!

Horse Switches Leads in Back at Canter!! Help!

Post by Excel Equestria » Fri, 28 Jan 2005 12:20:33


I have a 13 year old QH mare who always picks up her left lead canter
correctly. She also picks up her right lead canter correctly but she will be
on right lead in front and switch to left lead in back. On the lunge line,
she does not do this. I have been sticking to walk and trot work with her
because I do not want to confuse her at the canter. Any suggestions for how
I can get her to stay with the correct lead at the canter front and back?
And if she does switch leads in back, what should I do? Should I go to a
trot and then re-ask for the canter or should I just pull her up and walk
her on a long rein or something else? I believe cantering her on a circle
helps because the slight inside bend encourages her to stay on the correct
lead front and back. Please-any comments or suggestions are greatly
appreciated! While lunging or riding in the ring I use a double jointed
kimberwicke with a copper roller (no curb chain) for a bit. When out on the
trails I use a regular kimberwicke with a curb chain and a running
martingale (she is VERY strong). I believe in using the mildest bit possible
and the least amount of "equipment" possible (the running martingale is only
for that extra control on the trail in case the worst happens and she takes
off, etc.).

(Background Info: She's a 13 y.of. QH mare who is an ex-barrel racer and has
just been switched to English 2 years ago. We believe she was abused in the
past-there are scars all over her when she is clipped. When purchased she
was being ridden is a very harsh***bit. Fortunately, she seems to trust us
and know that we will not hurt her in anyway.)

 
 
 

Horse Switches Leads in Back at Canter!! Help!

Post by Terry von Geas » Fri, 28 Jan 2005 13:05:05


Quote:
> I have a 13 year old QH mare who always picks up her left lead canter
> correctly. She also picks up her right lead canter correctly but she will
be
> on right lead in front and switch to left lead in back. On the lunge line,
> she does not do this. I have been sticking to walk and trot work with her
> because I do not want to confuse her at the canter. Any suggestions for
how
> I can get her to stay with the correct lead at the canter front and back?
> And if she does switch leads in back, what should I do? Should I go to a
> trot and then re-ask for the canter or should I just pull her up and walk
> her on a long rein or something else? I believe cantering her on a circle
> helps because the slight inside bend encourages her to stay on the correct
> lead front and back. Please-any comments or suggestions are greatly
> appreciated!

If a horse switches leads in back either you're telling it to do so or it's
favoring some weakness. Figure out which.

Nonetheless, if and when is does switch in back, pick up its head to the
outside and boot it back into having all four legs in the same lead. One way
to do this is to drift it away from the lead in front, almost a gentle
sidepass, then switch legs and hit it smartly with your outside leg. Augment
with spur or crop to suit your tastes and abilities.

Quote:
>While lunging or riding in the ring I use a double jointed
> kimberwicke with a copper roller (no curb chain) for a bit. When out on
the
> trails I use a regular kimberwicke with a curb chain and a running
> martingale (she is VERY strong). I believe in using the mildest bit
possible
> and the least amount of "equipment" possible (the running martingale is
only
> for that extra control on the trail in case the worst happens and she
takes
> off, etc.).

Throw that ***away and get an actual bit. A kimberwicke is one of the
worst pieces of nonsense this side of a mechanical hackamore.  If you using
that junk for a snaffle, get a snaffle. A loose ring snaffle iron snaffle,
they sell them at feed stores for about $5. They work far better that a bit
that doesn't know what it wants to be.

If whatever you're riding is in the bridle, then use a bridle. Assuming you
understand that last sentence.

Lose the running martingale, you're using it for the wrong reasons.
Likewise, if you have to bit up to have a spin in the great outdoors, you
really should learn to ride.

There is no amount of hardware you can use to make up for any lack of
ability to ride a horse.

Quote:
> (Background Info: She's a 13 y.of. QH mare who is an ex-barrel racer and
has
> just been switched to English 2 years ago. We believe she was abused in
the
> past-there are scars all over her when she is clipped.

Ah yes, they're all abused. What a dynamite way to rationalize both the
animal's and your own shortcomings.

Quote:
> When purchased she
> was being ridden is a very harsh***bit.

Gags aren't inherently harsh, just silly if not used for the one purpose for
which they are intended.

Quote:
>Fortunately, she seems to trust us
> and know that we will not hurt her in anyway.)

Talk about gags...

--
Terry

      You can accomplish more with a smile and a gun
      than just a smile.

 
 
 

Horse Switches Leads in Back at Canter!! Help!

Post by cind » Fri, 28 Jan 2005 16:15:35

Quote:

> I have a 13 year old QH mare who always picks up her left lead canter
> correctly. She also picks up her right lead canter correctly but she
will be
> on right lead in front and switch to left lead in back.

snip...

What cue do you use to ask for the canter?  Here is my viewpoint:

Horse has to know that your leg is meant to position the hips.  Horse
has to have some other cue for acceleration.  Then, for a right lead,
you hold the shoulders straight or maybe a tad to the left if needed,
and use your outside leg behind the girth to shift the hips over, and
the acceleration cue to pick up the lope.  This ensures the hind end
gets into the right lead.  If it's initiated from the hind end, the
horse is much less likely to be on one lead up front and other behind.

If things start out wrong or wind up wrong, stop, start over.

Hire an instructor to watch and see what's going on.  Have that
instructor get on and figure out what else there is to figure out.
It's possible the horse is hurting or just not muscled up correctly.

Now, the best advice you'll ever get:  Start the Parelli program.  It
was MADE for people like you!  You will love it, I'm quite sure.  You
will learn that you should not be using a bit to control your horse, or
a tie down, or any other piece of equipment.  ONLY training influences
the horse.  Any horse without sufficient training can override almost
any equipment you can get onto it.  Once you are ready and your horse
is ready, you will learn how to get those leads perfectly, riding in a
halter and lead rope!  You'll also start riding with one rein only so
you learn to stop pulling to stop.  If you stick with it, you'll ride
with no bridle and instead just extra long arms (by the use of sticks).
The purpose is not to look cute or put on a circus show, but to teach
you beyond any doubt that you do not need a harsh bit or gadgets like
tie downs or martingales to control a horse.

Then once you get thru the fundamentals, you'll be on you way to being
ready to ride in a more focused manner, and perhaps in a specific
discipline, whatever it is you choose.  Then you'll go back to a bit,
then you'll start worrying about collection and whatnot.  But for now,
you have to use a certain bit with a martingale to feel safe riding
your horse out, and that needs to change.  That should change before
you worry about what lead she's on.

A LOT of people do not like the Parelli program.  Good for them, if
they don't need it.  These are the sorts of people who don't need to
ask how to get their horse to be on the same lead both front and back,
or who don't need to put on a martingale to trail ride... They are
godlike in their knowledge of horses and don't need any help, ever...
:-)  heh heh, so OK, I'm getting a bit carried away.

For what it's worth, I personally like Clinton Anderson more than
Parelli.  But Parelli continues to be the most accessible program that
I've encountered, the easiest to follow, the most complete, and with
the most support, both online, in written and video format, and thru
the use of his certified instructors.  (And Pat himself, if you can
stomach it... Personally I prefer to read his words instead of listen
to him in person.  His real life persona rubs me the wrong way.)
good luck,
cindi
http://www.allisonacres.com

 
 
 

Horse Switches Leads in Back at Canter!! Help!

Post by Dana Compt » Sat, 29 Jan 2005 04:33:20

Quote:

>I have a 13 year old QH mare who always picks up her left lead canter
>correctly. She also picks up her right lead canter correctly but she will be
>on right lead in front and switch to left lead in back. On the lunge line,
>she does not do this. I have been sticking to walk and trot work with her
>because I do not want to confuse her at the canter. Any suggestions for how
>I can get her to stay with the correct lead at the canter front and back?
>And if she does switch leads in back, what should I do? Should I go to a
>trot and then re-ask for the canter or should I just pull her up and walk
>her on a long rein or something else? I believe cantering her on a circle
>helps because the slight inside bend encourages her to stay on the correct
>lead front and back.

Left back  hip/leg/hoof soreness. On the lunge she can fall out and protect
that area. OH and don't use a leverage bit without a curb chain. Either use a
snaffle or a curb with a chain and learn the difference.
Dana  

Azthor - 8 year old  Saddlebred gelding
Juan's Magic- 17 year old Thoroughbred gelding

The Urantia Book a Logical/Scientific Christian Book
www.urantia.com

 
 
 

Horse Switches Leads in Back at Canter!! Help!

Post by Tamara in T » Sat, 29 Jan 2005 04:54:35

Quote:

> I have a 13 year old QH mare who always picks up her left lead canter
> correctly. She also picks up her right lead canter correctly but she
will be
> on right lead in front and switch to left lead in back

adding on to what Terry has said...I've found it a weakness in the
loin/hip on the side unable to maintain the lead behind...stop
cantering so hard and break it into coil and un coiling the loins and
surrounding muscles...(translated) softer sessions with more emphasis
on reps of canter to trot or walk and less barreling around...oh and
teaching her to rate a bit better will help relax those same muscles
Tamara in TN
 
 
 

Horse Switches Leads in Back at Canter!! Help!

Post by Kris Anderso » Sat, 29 Jan 2005 05:50:16

Quote:

> ....
> Ah yes, they're all abused. What a dynamite way to rationalize both
the
> animal's and your own shortcomings.

Or as my vet says, "Ah yes, she must have been previously abused by a
man".  (He apparently hears this one way too often.)
Kris
--
Kris Anderson
Williamstown, MA
 
 
 

Horse Switches Leads in Back at Canter!! Help!

Post by Excel Equestria » Sat, 29 Jan 2005 10:48:24

What do you mean by "teach her to rate a bit better"? What does rate mean?
She is an English horse, not western (don't know if this was clear from my
post). I do know that lots of up and down transitions are wonderful for
developing muscle and control, especially walk to trot and trot to walk
transitions. Also I've heard within a  gait transitions are very helpful
(I.e. extended walk to a more collected walk back to a more extended walk,
etc) but she isn't quite ready to length and shorten strides and her
frame-we're still working on developing her muscles and we're taking it
slowly.



Quote:


>> I have a 13 year old QH mare who always picks up her left lead canter

>> correctly. She also picks up her right lead canter correctly but she
> will be
>> on right lead in front and switch to left lead in back

> adding on to what Terry has said...I've found it a weakness in the
> loin/hip on the side unable to maintain the lead behind...stop
> cantering so hard and break it into coil and un coiling the loins and
> surrounding muscles...(translated) softer sessions with more emphasis
> on reps of canter to trot or walk and less barreling around...oh and
> teaching her to rate a bit better will help relax those same muscles
> Tamara in TN

 
 
 

Horse Switches Leads in Back at Canter!! Help!

Post by Excel Equestria » Sat, 29 Jan 2005 12:06:38

I don't _want_ to ride her in a kimberwicke and running martingale but it is
the only way we can go on trail rides right now (and she loves going on the
trail)--I keep the reins loose (mild contact but I don't hang on her mouth)
and the kimberwicke with curbchain is only there for when it is absolutely
necessary (and it almost never is). She is a very forward, strong horse and
safety is definitely important out in the field-I must be able to control
her if she spooks suddenly or bolts (we have to contend with deer jumping
out at us, runners coming up silently behind us, etc-she isn't spooky but
considering her strength and power and that she is rather green, I don't
want her to get hurt or me to get hurt because she rears or bolts! I am a
major proponent of the mildest bit  possible-usually a thick snaffle! The
running martingale is because she used to have some problems with rearing
(never with me) and it is properly adjusted so it does not affect her at all
unless she really throws her head  up (a horse can't rear if they can't get
their head way up). The running martingale is really only for safety (hers &
mine)-not because I can't ride but because I don't want my  face broken if
she throws her head or for her to throw her head up and rear in the park. A
double jointed kimberwicke with a copper roller in the middle is a fairly
mild bit-it looks like a french link but with the kimberwicke cheeks and of
course instead of the french link in the middle it has a small copper roller
(her double jointed kimberwicke DOES NOT have a curb
chain). I ride her in the double jointed kimberwicke with no curb chain in
the ring and am hoping to move her to a french link snaffle eventually (I
prefer double jointed bits to single jointed "nutcracker" action ones). I am
also considering a baucher Waterford bit for her as she carries her head
very high naturally and the baucher cheeks are supposed to have a slight
head lowering effect by putting mild poll pressure on the horse. I agree
that adding equipment is not the answer to riding problems-more training is.
I don't believe in all those gadgets and I only use the running martingale
for safety out not he trail as explained above. She is ridden English-I
don't know if I mentioned this earlier. I agree that she may be weaker in
her right hind leg and this contributes to her switching leads in back on
the right lead canter.
I don't think stating that she was probably abused is an "excuse"-I am
taking things very slow with her as I am retraining her to English from
western and we mainly do walk-trot work (until she builds up more muscle and
maintains good rhythm). I have been told the correct order to work on things
is: Rhythm Suppleness Contact Straightness Impulsion Collection (and yes I
know the process of getting to collection takes years). I believe there has
to be good communication between horse and rider and TRUST. I just mention
the probable past abuse because she is very defensive of her mouth and
throws her head up when you put pressure on the reins and she has other
responses that indicate she was treated very harshly. She also looks like
she was beaten at one point-when she is clipped to the skin you can see
scars all over her body-it's terrible what some people do to horses. As for
possible right hind leg weakness-I have heard that horse chiropractors use
ultrasound therapy to heal-anyone have experience with this? Is it worth
doing or an alternate chiropractic therapy? Thanks



Quote:


>> I have a 13 year old QH mare who always picks up her left lead canter
>> correctly. She also picks up her right lead canter correctly but she will
> be
>> on right lead in front and switch to left lead in back. On the lunge
>> line,
>> she does not do this. I have been sticking to walk and trot work with her
>> because I do not want to confuse her at the canter. Any suggestions for
> how
>> I can get her to stay with the correct lead at the canter front and back?
>> And if she does switch leads in back, what should I do? Should I go to a
>> trot and then re-ask for the canter or should I just pull her up and walk
>> her on a long rein or something else? I believe cantering her on a circle
>> helps because the slight inside bend encourages her to stay on the
>> correct
>> lead front and back. Please-any comments or suggestions are greatly
>> appreciated!

> If a horse switches leads in back either you're telling it to do so or
> it's
> favoring some weakness. Figure out which.

> Nonetheless, if and when is does switch in back, pick up its head to the
> outside and boot it back into having all four legs in the same lead. One
> way
> to do this is to drift it away from the lead in front, almost a gentle
> sidepass, then switch legs and hit it smartly with your outside leg.
> Augment
> with spur or crop to suit your tastes and abilities.

>>While lunging or riding in the ring I use a double jointed
>> kimberwicke with a copper roller (no curb chain) for a bit. When out on
> the
>> trails I use a regular kimberwicke with a curb chain and a running
>> martingale (she is VERY strong). I believe in using the mildest bit
> possible
>> and the least amount of "equipment" possible (the running martingale is
> only
>> for that extra control on the trail in case the worst happens and she
> takes
>> off, etc.).

> Throw that ***away and get an actual bit. A kimberwicke is one of the
> worst pieces of nonsense this side of a mechanical hackamore.  If you
> using
> that junk for a snaffle, get a snaffle. A loose ring snaffle iron snaffle,
> they sell them at feed stores for about $5. They work far better that a
> bit
> that doesn't know what it wants to be.

> If whatever you're riding is in the bridle, then use a bridle. Assuming
> you
> understand that last sentence.

> Lose the running martingale, you're using it for the wrong reasons.
> Likewise, if you have to bit up to have a spin in the great outdoors, you
> really should learn to ride.

> There is no amount of hardware you can use to make up for any lack of
> ability to ride a horse.

>> (Background Info: She's a 13 y.of. QH mare who is an ex-barrel racer and
> has
>> just been switched to English 2 years ago. We believe she was abused in
> the
>> past-there are scars all over her when she is clipped.

> Ah yes, they're all abused. What a dynamite way to rationalize both the
> animal's and your own shortcomings.

>> When purchased she
>> was being ridden is a very harsh***bit.

> Gags aren't inherently harsh, just silly if not used for the one purpose
> for
> which they are intended.

>>Fortunately, she seems to trust us
>> and know that we will not hurt her in anyway.)

> Talk about gags...

> --
> Terry

>      You can accomplish more with a smile and a gun
>      than just a smile.

 
 
 

Horse Switches Leads in Back at Canter!! Help!

Post by lizzard woma » Sat, 29 Jan 2005 12:28:42


(snip)

| I am
| also considering a baucher Waterford bit for her as she carries her head
| very high naturally and the baucher cheeks are supposed to have a slight
| head lowering effect by putting mild poll pressure on the horse. I agree
| that adding equipment is not the answer to riding problems-more training
is.

My Petey Pie tends to want to travel with his head too high (like an upper
level horse which he is not) and inverted.  I've only owned him less than
two months but I can get his head/neck down and have him working over his
back virtually all the time with just leg to hand and practice.  I suggest
you try it without adding gadgets first.  In fact you should be able to put
your horse's neck anywhere you want it at any time off your fingertips.  A
good thing to practice is to stretch at the end of the workout wherein you
work towards getting the horse to completely lower and stretch the neck down
though still reaching for contact.  I do this atthe trot and keep at one
speed just with my seat.  The horse should still be bending around the
corners and flexed towards the inside.  Try it on the inside track also.

(snip)

| I have been told the correct order to work on things
| is: Rhythm Suppleness Contact Straightness Impulsion Collection (and yes I
| know the process of getting to collection takes years).

This is the stuff usually presented in a pyramid, no, where you accomplish
the lower levels and build up?  Can you recommend a web site?

--
love,
la mangos***a

"The United States of America is not in any sense founded on the Christian
Religion" -- Treaty of Tripoli, 1797, ratified by Congress
"Religion did for bullshit, what Stonehenge did for rocks." -- The World
Famous Tink

 
 
 

Horse Switches Leads in Back at Canter!! Help!

Post by Joyce Reynolds-War » Sat, 29 Jan 2005 12:35:34

On Fri, 28 Jan 2005 03:06:38 GMT, "Excel Equestrian"

Quote:

>I don't _want_ to ride her in a kimberwicke and running martingale but it is
>the only way we can go on trail rides right now (and she loves going on the
>trail)--I keep the reins loose (mild contact but I don't hang on her mouth)

Wrong.

She lacks a good whoa if that's what it takes to control her.

Quote:
>and the kimberwicke with curbchain is only there for when it is absolutely
>necessary (and it almost never is). She is a very forward, strong horse and
>safety is definitely important out in the field-I must be able to control
>her if she spooks suddenly or bolts (we have to contend with deer jumping
>out at us, runners coming up silently behind us, etc-she isn't spooky but
>considering her strength and power and that she is rather green, I don't
>want her to get hurt or me to get hurt because she rears or bolts!

Lessons for you.  Training for her.  Harsh (and useless) bitting is no
excuse for that.  You *shouldn't* need that kind of firepower, even on
a greenie on the trail.  If you *need* that kind of firepower, then
both of you need training.

Quote:
> I am a
>major proponent of the mildest bit  possible-usually a thick snaffle! The
>running martingale is because she used to have some problems with rearing

Useless for rearing.

Quote:
>(never with me) and it is properly adjusted so it does not affect her at all
>unless she really throws her head  up (a horse can't rear if they can't get
>their head way up). The running martingale is really only for safety (hers &
>mine)-not because I can't ride but because I don't want my  face broken if
>she throws her head or for her to throw her head up and rear in the park.

Jesus, Mary and Joseph.

That is *not* the purpose of a running martingale.  It's the wrong
piece of equipment for that particular purpose.

Quote:
> A
>double jointed kimberwicke with a copper roller in the middle is a fairly
>mild bit-it looks like a french link but with the kimberwicke cheeks and of
>course instead of the french link in the middle it has a small copper roller

It's a fricking kimberwick.  It's a *curb* bit.  It operates on
leverage.

Learn about your bits before you start playing with them.

jrw

 
 
 

Horse Switches Leads in Back at Canter!! Help!

Post by Carlyle Emerso » Sat, 29 Jan 2005 12:46:50


Quote:
>I don't _want_ to ride her in a kimberwicke and running martingale but it
>is
> the only way we can go on trail rides right now (and she loves going on
> the
> trail)--I keep the reins loose (mild contact but I don't hang on her
> mouth)
> and the kimberwicke with curbchain is only there for when it is absolutely
> necessary (and it almost never is). She is a very forward, strong horse
> and
> safety is definitely important out in the field-I must be able to control
> her if she spooks suddenly or bolts (we have to contend with deer jumping
> out at us, runners coming up silently behind us, etc-she isn't spooky but
> considering her strength and power and that she is rather green,

Take the previous good advice and spend time learning to ride.  As in
learning to possess the horse's mind.  You may be able to sit more or less
erect on a dead horse but that isn't what it's about.  Deer and runners are
barely interesting except that you feel you have to "contend" with them.

Stop explaining how she's rather green when she's a 13 yo ex barrel racer
who's being retrained.  The rider is the problem here.  Just who is
retraining her, anyway?

[...]

I have been told the correct order to work on things

Quote:
> is: Rhythm Suppleness Contact Straightness Impulsion Collection (and yes I
> know the process of getting to collection takes years).

Work on owning the horse's attention.

 I believe there has

Quote:
> to be good communication between horse and rider and TRUST. I just mention
> the probable past abuse because she is very defensive of her mouth and
> throws her head up when you put pressure on the reins and she has other
> responses that indicate she was treated very harshly. She also looks like
> she was beaten at one point-when she is clipped to the skin you can see
> scars all over her body-it's terrible what some people do to horses.

It _is_ terrible what some people do to horses, but you'll find her problems
will diminish vastly when you connect with her head and rely less on
equipment.  Learn to ride.

 As for

Quote:
> possible right hind leg weakness-I have heard that horse chiropractors use
> ultrasound therapy to heal-anyone have experience with this? Is it worth
> doing or an alternate chiropractic therapy? Thanks

How about having a vet diagnosis?  It's often a good idea to have a medical
opinion before treating some vague "possible right hind leg weakness",
whatever that may mean.
 
 
 

Horse Switches Leads in Back at Canter!! Help!

Post by Dana Compto » Sat, 29 Jan 2005 14:07:56

I've found it a weakness in the
loin/hip on the side unable to maintain the lead behind...stop
cantering so hard and break it into coil and un coiling the loins and
surrounding muscles...(translated) softer sessions with more emphasis
on reps of canter to trot or walk and less barreling around...oh and
teaching her to rate a bit better will help relax those same muscles
Tamara in TN

I have found it is the opposite hind that has the weakness. Say right
lead, the left hip is the pushing hip.

Dana Compton

 
 
 

Horse Switches Leads in Back at Canter!! Help!

Post by cind » Sat, 29 Jan 2005 22:08:18

Quote:

> I don't _want_ to ride her in a kimberwicke and running martingale
but it is
> the only way we can go on trail rides right now (and she loves going
on the
> trail)--I keep the reins loose (mild contact but I don't hang on her
mouth)
> and the kimberwicke with curbchain is only there for when it is
absolutely
> necessary (and it almost never is).

snip...

Bits and martingales do not control horses - training controls horses.

Quote:
> I just mention
> the probable past abuse because she is very defensive of her mouth
and
> throws her head up when you put pressure on the reins and she has
other
> responses that indicate she was treated very harshly.

Here is what that probably means: whenever anybody tried to touch her
ears or her mouth or put pressure on the reins, she resisted, and the
person gave in and let go.  Horses learn to throw their heads around
when that's what gives them a release from pressure - even slight
pressure.  And most people I've seen do not know how to teach a horse
to give to pressure.  They want to touch the mouth, so they reach out
to grab the mouth.  The horse says hey there, wait just a minute and
throws his head up.  The person then puts her hand back down, gives up
trying to touch the mouth, and might instead talk soothingly to the
horse (thereby praising it for its behaviors), and then they try again.
The horse pulls away even quicker this time, and again the human gives
up.  This is what teaches horses to pull away, throw their heads...

I have had around 15 horses who were extremely resistant to being
bridled, and a few in that group who were also resistant to having
their ears handled.  They all learned in about 7 minutes to hold still
for me.  It's all in when you give the release.  If you give the
release when they are trying to escape you, they learn to try to escape
you.  Several of my students watching and learning the process remarked
about how the horse must have been abused.  That's a very common idea,
but it doesn't have to be true to wind up with a horse who's defensive
about having her mouth touched or ears handled or whatever.  Any person
who is clueless can create that response in a horse in a few seconds
and with a few repetitions.

Quote:
> She also looks like
> she was beaten at one point-when she is clipped to the skin you can
see
> scars all over her body-it's terrible what some people do to horses.

I'd ask a vet if what you are seeing really are scars.  I have my
doubts.  And even if they are scars, you have no way of knowing if she
was beaten.  Horses hurt themselves all the time.  I'd venture a guess
that most scars on horses are from interactions with other horses.
cindi
 
 
 

Horse Switches Leads in Back at Canter!! Help!

Post by Tamara in T » Sat, 29 Jan 2005 22:55:01

Quote:

> What do you mean by "teach her to rate a bit better"? What does rate
mean?
> She is an English horse, not western (don't know if this was clear
from my
> post).

there is  no difference between the two...and she you did say she ran
barrels? that is pretty much a western horse <g>

but "Rating" is to drive or slow  from the seat rather than the
reins...by teaching the seat the riders reliance on the reins fade and
the horse generally goes  better by not going hollow avoiding the bit
Tamara in TN

 
 
 

Horse Switches Leads in Back at Canter!! Help!

Post by Tamara in T » Sat, 29 Jan 2005 23:05:23

(a horse can't rear if they can't get

Quote:
> their head way up).

yes they can...not only  can they rear  they can also flip over
backward

The running martingale is really only for safety (hers &

Quote:
> mine)-not because I can't ride but because I don't want my  face
broken if
> she throws her head or for her to throw her head up and rear in the

park.

please  see my other post  re: rating

I am

Quote:
> also considering a baucher Waterford bit for her as she carries her
head
> very high naturally and the baucher cheeks are supposed to have a
slight
> head lowering effect by putting mild poll pressure on the horse.

bahhhh....poll pressure  does  not  drop a head...relaxation
and simplified training will...ride forward and ride quietly...she will
follow your  lead

Rhythm Suppleness Contact Straightness Impulsion Collection (and yes I

Quote:
> know the process of getting to collection takes years)

repeat after me....walk..stop...walk...stop...walk...stop...

I just mention

Quote:
> the probable past abuse because she is very defensive of her mouth
and
> throws her head up when you put pressure on the reins and she has
other
> responses that indicate she was treated very harshly.

she responds to your hands on the reins  not the hands of an
imaginary rider in the dark wicked  past...in one lesson you should
have a minute result toward fixing that...surely in 5 lessons you'd
have a marked improvement

        Tamara in TN